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Ultra High Definition TVs A place to discuss Ultra high-definition television which includes 4K UHDTV (2160p) and 8K UHDTV (4320p)

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  • 1 Post By ShaqDan

Dolby Vision in Netflix is a broken scam.

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Old 03-09-2017, 04:06 PM   #1
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Default Dolby Vision in Netflix is a broken scam.

I find it atrocious. Very cloudy and grainy. Dark scenes look ok, but bright or white scenes have atrocious grain. It looks like dolby vision is totally broken.

Anybody else notice this issue with netflix quality? I' m getting 70-80 mbps speed. I have LG uh7650 55" UHD looks better then dolby vision titles. In fact my verizon fios 1080 p looks better. There is no way its an aesthetic style preference, more like its a going cheap while charging more preference.

Amazon hdr, on the other hand, looks absolutely stunning and amazing. Especially after they provided vivid and bright presets this past week. But Dolby Vision vivid settings on netflix make everything look even worse. All whites are grainy. turning down sharpness helps a little but something is very very wrong. Netflix just keeps telling me they are looking into the issue.

The netflix research team actually told me LG has reported this issue to them, but that I am the first customer to report it. Then they told me they have asimilar model tv but lost the remote to test it lol. Its Been over a month... amazon fixed two bugs for me, but netflix is ignoring issues.

In fact they are going out of their way to hide the issue. I told them how meridian was in hdr10 and looks way way better then their dolby vision titles. They assured me they would use meridian as their guide. But instead what they did was label meridan dolby vision instead of hdr. But its not playing in either format!! UHD only now. I think netflix doesn't want other users to realize that hdr looks way better cause dolby vision is broken. Very unscrupulous practice by netflix. They have been doing other things I'll keep to my self, but this is unacceptable. They should provide an option to turn hdr/dolby off and watch uhd only at this point.

Marco Polo looks ok, I don't notice much grain and dolby vision vivid settings look great with it. But all the marvel shows, the OA....look disgusting. Is it true Marco got dolby vision first? did the go cheap after that? I hope netflix fixes these issues so people can enjoy them in the extra high quality they are paying for, instead of less quality.

Is it just me? Anybody else watchying dolby vision shows on netflix big screen?
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Old 03-13-2017, 07:38 AM   #2
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Did you seriously make a new account on here just to complain about Netflix?
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Old 03-19-2017, 05:00 PM   #3
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Default Similar issue

I'm using an LG UH7700 (or something similar to that name) and notice dolby vision being grainy on netflix. Was watching the new Iron Fist and it looks very grainy. Not sure if someone knows certain settings that I could change to make it better. Thanks for any tips!
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Old 03-21-2017, 06:11 AM   #4
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Default Netflix DolbyVision Grainy

I have an OLED C6 and I've tried a number of different settings but DolbyVision on Netflix is annoyingly grainy...
HDR on Amazon Prime is fantastic by comparison.
I too would be gratful for suggestions.
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Old 04-08-2017, 04:35 AM   #5
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I have the exact same experience on my LG B6 oled TV. Everything in Dolby Vision looks absolutely terrible streaming from Netflix. Marco Polo is an exception: the picture looks ok, but I've got some visual "pre-echo", something I'd never experienced before! So, for me, Netflix+Dolby Vision= catastrophe. I've already contacted both companies with my complaint, by the way. Not sure it's gonna change anything...I'm not holding my breath.
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Old 04-09-2017, 08:40 AM   #6
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Yeah Netflix DV is meh. Vudu on the other hand is outstanding imo .
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Old 05-24-2017, 05:04 PM   #7
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Default Having SAME grainy issue on my lg oled c6p

You are not first case cause I addressed this issue to them 3 months ago and they said they never heard this I am the first person so you are absolutely right they trying to hide this under the rug... iron fist looks really bad.. mostly marvel shows too
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Old 06-22-2017, 10:23 AM   #8
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The issue isn't Netflix or our TVs, it's Dolby Vision in general. If you go to a theater that supports Dolby Vision (they're typically specialty theaters, like an iMAX), watch the really bright scenes. While it's not as noticeable as on our crystal clear tvs in front of our face, you can DEFINITELY see the grain.

Dolby vision is trying to fix a problem that TVs and theaters don't show contrast well, so they beef up the brights to show big contrast to the blacks. However, that simply adds grain. You need better TVs (why our OLEDs look stunning with regular content) or better projectors -- no one ever complained about contrast to me at an iMAX theater.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:01 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericsmcdonald View Post
The issue isn't Netflix or our TVs, it's Dolby Vision in general. If you go to a theater that supports Dolby Vision (they're typically specialty theaters, like an iMAX), watch the really bright scenes. While it's not as noticeable as on our crystal clear tvs in front of our face, you can DEFINITELY see the grain.

Dolby vision is trying to fix a problem that TVs and theaters don't show contrast well, so they beef up the brights to show big contrast to the blacks. However, that simply adds grain. You need better TVs (why our OLEDs look stunning with regular content) or better projectors -- no one ever complained about contrast to me at an iMAX theater.
You keep referring to grain which is part of the analog film system. Almost all movies today are shot using digital cameras - no such thing as grain.

Dolby Vision is the home version of the process used in Dolby Cinemas. Prior to HDR ALL movies were mastered using a maximum brightness level of 100 nits. With the advent of HDR they are now mastered at 1000 nits. HDR is not a case of just expanding the brightness levels. You have to maintain the deep blacks at the same time which is something the WCG (Wide Color Gamut) handles.

Dolby Cinemas use 12 bit color space. This results in a Gray Scale of 4096 steps. This is what creates the fine detail in the low light level scenes and helps to maintain the deep blacks when the brightness levels reaches 4000 nits which the Cinema Digital Laser Projectors that Dolby uses for it's Dolby Cinemas can reach. Both Barco and Christie are working on bringing out CDLPs that can reach 10,000 nits which is part of the specs for professional Dolby Vision.

Yes - we do need better TVs. We need them to be 12 bit panels instead of today's 10 bit panels so we can increase the Gray Scale from 1024 steps to 4096 steps. And we would like them to reach a peak brightness level of 4000 nits instead of today's 1000 nits, which BTW the OLEDs can't reach. They top out at about 800 nits while a few of the quantum dot LED/LCDs can do over 1100 nits.

But keep this in mind . . . up until 2016 TVs were 8 bit with a Gray Scale of 256 steps and a peak brightness of about 300 nits. It had been that way for over 20 years. Just think what TVs will look like just 3 years from today.

Last edited by Lee Stewart; 06-22-2017 at 11:08 AM..
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Old 07-15-2017, 05:41 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post
You keep referring to grain which is part of the analog film system. Almost all movies today are shot using digital cameras - no such thing as grain.

Dolby Vision is the home version of the process used in Dolby Cinemas. Prior to HDR ALL movies were mastered using a maximum brightness level of 100 nits. With the advent of HDR they are now mastered at 1000 nits. HDR is not a case of just expanding the brightness levels. You have to maintain the deep blacks at the same time which is something the WCG (Wide Color Gamut) handles.

Dolby Cinemas use 12 bit color space. This results in a Gray Scale of 4096 steps. This is what creates the fine detail in the low light level scenes and helps to maintain the deep blacks when the brightness levels reaches 4000 nits which the Cinema Digital Laser Projectors that Dolby uses for it's Dolby Cinemas can reach. Both Barco and Christie are working on bringing out CDLPs that can reach 10,000 nits which is part of the specs for professional Dolby Vision.

Yes - we do need better TVs. We need them to be 12 bit panels instead of today's 10 bit panels so we can increase the Gray Scale from 1024 steps to 4096 steps. And we would like them to reach a peak brightness level of 4000 nits instead of today's 1000 nits, which BTW the OLEDs can't reach. They top out at about 800 nits while a few of the quantum dot LED/LCDs can do over 1100 nits.

But keep this in mind . . . up until 2016 TVs were 8 bit with a Gray Scale of 256 steps and a peak brightness of about 300 nits. It had been that way for over 20 years. Just think what TVs will look like just 3 years from today.
Thanks for admitting and confirming its all a scam and lies Lee.
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Old 07-15-2017, 08:28 PM   #11
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Thanks for admitting and confirming its all a scam and lies Lee.
Sorry to burst your bubble . . .

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