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Old 03-23-2006, 07:03 PM   #1  
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I'd like to add a ups to my dlp tv power source but not sure how large of rating I need.The only thing I want to do is hook the tv to it so I can shut down normally after a power loss,all my other components will be hooked to my monster power surge protector.So it's not for an extended length of time,just long enough to let the bulb cool down and a normal shutdown after power loss.I saw a really nice looking tripp lite at costco today( model HT-10000ups) for $100.Rated at 1000va-500watt.How do you figure out if the run time would be long enough.
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Old 03-23-2006, 07:27 PM   #2  
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I am looking to do the same thing but I want to add my D* HR10-250 unit to the UPS. Looking forward to any opinions offered.
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Old 03-23-2006, 07:35 PM   #3  
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That one will be fine. I'm sure. Basically what you want is the watt-hours. I couldn't find your model specs, but the 350 watt unit will operate 345 watt load for 7 minutes. That would be roughly 2,415 watt-minutes which would run a 150 watt load for about 16 minutes.
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Old 03-23-2006, 08:01 PM   #4  
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Hey rbinck do you know anything about the Opti ES1000C?

Thanks
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Old 03-23-2006, 08:39 PM   #5  
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specs from tripp lite site
Full load runtime: 3 min. (1000VA/500W)
Half load runtime: 11 min. (500VA/250W)
DC system voltage: 12VDC
Typical battery lifespan: 4-6 years (depending on usage)
Battery recharge rate: 2-8 hours to 90%

do you still think it's up to the task? I've no idea what the set draws power wise,I couldn't find any specs like that in the manual(RCA HDLP50W151YX3)
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Old 03-23-2006, 09:40 PM   #6  
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I have a similar RCA DLP and I checked the spec pages in the manual and it doesn't say what the wattage used is. I suspect it is in the range of 250-450 watts. I know the lamp is 120 watts, the fans probably add another 75 watts, and the remaining electronics probably use another 75-250 watts.

Based on the Tripplite specs and my high guessimate of 450watts you should get about 12-14 minutes which would be plenty of time to cool the lamp. After my 4 year extended warranty runs out which covers unlimited lamps, I will probably get a 1000va UPS myself.

Hope this helps!
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Old 03-23-2006, 09:47 PM   #7  
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Another opinion request,when I do decide on a ups model would it matter if I plugged it into the monster surge protector or should I just plug it into a reg outlet,does it matter one way or the other?
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Old 03-24-2006, 01:18 AM   #8  
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I have heard that you should NOT plug a UPS into a surge protector which then goes into the wall. I forget the reason, but I have always done this figuring (especially when they cost $500.00) it is cheaper to replace a surge protector than a UPS and having the surgeP take the front line hit if it comes would make sense.
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Old 03-24-2006, 12:21 PM   #9  
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Found one in Fridays Fry's ad http://shop3.outpost.com/product/469...H:MAIN_RSLT_PG ,it's $10.00 cheaper in my local store with the local ad from the paper as opposed to online.Rated at 1500va and 830watts,a little more than I wanted to spend but not bad after $40 rebate.This one should handle that dtv dvr I want to get along with the tv.
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Old 03-24-2006, 04:31 PM   #10  
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Sigh....to live near a 'Fry's Electronics' again. Doubt they will have one in these parts until Fry's is willing to start selling electric fences.
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Old 03-24-2006, 04:55 PM   #11  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wrench
Found one in Fridays Fry's ad http://shop3.outpost.com/product/469...H:MAIN_RSLT_PG ,it's $10.00 cheaper in my local store with the local ad from the paper as opposed to online.Rated at 1500va and 830watts,a little more than I wanted to spend but not bad after $40 rebate.This one should handle that dtv dvr I want to get along with the tv.
Costco usually has a APC or Tripplite 1000VA unit (500w) in their stores for $99
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Old 03-25-2006, 05:52 AM   #12  
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When Buying a UPS system, The Capacity is measured in Volt-amps, to find the nuber of volt-amps you need take the number of amps (times) 120 if the measurement is in watts, muiltiply by 1.82. For Example your PC monitor uses 2amps X 120=240 and your computer uses 100 watts (100x 1.82=182) the total volt-amps needed would be 407 (240 + 182=422)


The larger the UPS based on 422 say a ups 1500 would equal a longer run time or allow you time to safely turn off the appliance.
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Old 03-25-2006, 11:39 AM   #13  
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Might be easier to just take the VA rating times 0.60 to get 'watts'.
A 500VA UPS will handle a 300 watt load.
Allow at least 50-100% more for time reserve.
Many UPS now have rating in watts as well as volt-amps.
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Old 03-25-2006, 12:47 PM   #14  
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This might be a good time to explain the relationship between VoltAmps and Watts - Watts is the actual power consumed by the equipment -
Electronic equipment (power supplies and motors ) as opposed to heaters and incandescent bulbs -presents a reactive (inductive) load to the UPS and the Amps (of the VA) are shifted in time compared to the Volts
The Wattage consumed compared to the larger VA supplied is called the Power Factor
Which means the UPS _ (and the power company)- has to supply more Amps (based on trigonometric function of the shift -Cosφ-) than the Watts (no delay) -and the electric meter -would indicate - [Volts phase is the reference (constant)]
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_factor ...If φ is the phase angle between the current and voltage, then the power factor is equal to P=S (Cosφ ), and:
By definition, the power factor is a dimensionless number between 0 and 1. When power factor is equal to 0, the energy flow is entirely reactive, and stored energy in the load returns to the source on each cycle. When the power factor is 1 -entirely resistive , all the energy supplied by the source is consumed by the load. Power factors are usually stated as "leading" or "lagging" to show the sign of the phase angle.
The power factor is determined by the type of loads connected to the power system. These can be - Resistive or Reactive (Inductive or Capacitive)
If a purely resistive load is connected to a power supply, current and voltage will change polarity in phase, the power factor will be unity (1), and the electrical energy flows in a single direction across the network in each cycle. Inductive loads such as transformers and motors (any type of wound coil) generate reactive power with current waveform lagging the voltage. Capacitive loads such as capacitor banks or buried cable generate reactive power with current phase leading the voltage. Both types of loads will absorb energy during part of the AC cycle, only to send this energy back to the source during the rest of the cycle.
For example, to get 1 kW of real power if the power factor is unity, 1 kVA of apparent power needs to be transferred (1 kVA = 1 kW 1). At low values of power factor, more apparent power needs to be transferred to get the same real power. To get 1 kW of real power at 0.2 power factor 5 kVA of apparent power needs to be transferred (1 kW = 5 kVA 0.2).
see also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volt-amp

Last edited by maicaw; 03-25-2006 at 01:10 PM..
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Old 03-26-2006, 08:59 PM   #15  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maicaw
This might be a good time to explain the relationship between VoltAmps and Watts - Watts is the actual power consumed by the equipment -
Electronic equipment (power supplies and motors ) as opposed to heaters and incandescent bulbs -presents a reactive (inductive) load to the UPS and the Amps (of the VA) are shifted in time compared to the Volts
The Wattage consumed compared to the larger VA supplied is called the Power Factor
Which means the UPS _ (and the power company)- has to supply more Amps (based on trigonometric function of the shift -Cosφ-) than the Watts (no delay) -and the electric meter -would indicate - [Volts phase is the reference (constant)]
see also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volt-amp

Thanks for the disertation, professor. But been there done that. For the consumer 0.60 X VA = watts works out just fine for the intended application. Ballpark, yes, but certainly adequate.
Not to imply anything educational is not welcome.
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