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Need major help with wall mount!!!

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Old 03-14-2007, 11:58 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BobY
You have to be careful with those drywall anchors, too as it has a lot to do with where the drywall screws are. I've seen 30 lb fire extinguishers pull out "100 lb capacity" drywall anchors after somebody brushed against it--the drywall gets damaged and the anchor works its way out.

Whatever you do, don't use an adjustable mount!
That's right BobY . . he only said "wall mount" which could be either (fixed or adjustable). Excellent caution warning.
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Old 03-14-2007, 01:25 PM   #17
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Hey, does your stud finder have a metal finder on it as well? That should let you know if you have metal studs in your wall, there should be something backing up the drywall or you would see cracking.

I'm actually a structural engineer who designed these metal studs for about 3 years. If you can provide me with some more information I could help ease your mind about whether they will hold your TV. I Think it is possible to still use your mount but I would suggest spreading the load out among several studs with either a wooden board along the entire length of the TV mount, connected into every stud behind it (should be 12" on center), or the plywood as someone said above.

Edit: How old is the apartment? If it was contructed pretty recently (last 10 years) then I doubt its anything other than 25 gage steel studs.

Last edited by justpaul205; 03-14-2007 at 01:27 PM..
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Old 03-14-2007, 05:19 PM   #18
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I know this is varying the topic, but there are free standing tower mounts out there that almost make the tv look like it is mounted on the wall. Might search for that.
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Old 03-14-2007, 06:53 PM   #19
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An apartment complex would most definitely have heavy duty metal studs, not flimsy ones like you find at Home Depot. I'm certain they would support the weight if the mount was installed correctly.

However, I do believe there's a way to beef up the metal studs with wooden ones. If I recall correctly, you remove the section of drywall (wall to ceiling) where the mount will be installed. Then you secure wood studs to the metal ones, making sure to properly frame the entire thing. Replace the drywall and viola, nice strong wood studs to which you can install a mount. Do not take my example as the sure fire way to do things. Consult a licensed contractor in your area for assistance!
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Old 03-14-2007, 07:28 PM   #20
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Here is the link for NYS and NYC building codes for stairwells (which are for public use)

They specify 33 mil 20 gauge metal studs. I wouldn't call that "heavy duty."

See area called "installation" (adobe required)

http://home2.nyc.gov/html/dob/downloads/pdf/rule_32.pdf
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Old 03-14-2007, 07:37 PM   #21
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Those are strong supports. Remember, if you use metal studs you are required to have both top and bottom runner tracks that keep the studs in place. In addition, the gypsum board/drywall that's attached to the studs provides even support for weight. If you attach a wall mount to those studs, they won't crumple or fall apart under the weight. However, I would still recommend beefing up the studs as I described in my earlier post.
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Old 03-14-2007, 09:32 PM   #22
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I don't know about New York code, but around here if the building is something like ICF with concrete floors and ceilings or steel girder construction, the interior walls are not load bearing and, at least in commercial buildings, schools and churches, they routinely use aluminum studs (they're cheap, quick and make it very easy to reconfigure the interior if you want to move walls around).

These are so thin you can bend them by stepping on them (you'll often see a pile of bent studs on a job site) and they don't have much strength until they're locked into the header and footer rails. They have trusses that can be used in areas where extra strength is needed, but you need to do that before the drywall goes up.

http://www.istockphoto.com/file_clos...php?id=2029004

Last edited by BobY; 03-14-2007 at 09:46 PM..
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Old 11-27-2007, 05:52 PM   #23
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I don't know if you're still looking for an answer but one technique that I have used although it does require access above the wall is to slide a wood 2x4 inside the metal stud. You usually have to cut an access in the top runer and may have to plane down the 2x4 a little. I've done this on a few wall mounts, slid an 8 foot 2x4 inside the metal stud and it spreads the load very well. On most of these there was not enough room above the wall to get an 8 foot 2x4 lined up so had to cut the 2x4 and reattach the pieces as they were being slid into the metal stud, somewhat of a pain but it did make a nice solid mount. I'm about 175 lbs and hung on the wall mount before the TV was attached while a partner eyed the wall for any flexing. Felt very solid, unlikely that a plasma even on an articulating mount will pull an 8 foot piece through the metal studs.
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Old 11-27-2007, 06:24 PM   #24
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Just get a stud finder and make sure you find the wood beam. If the house is old then you might want to try stands.. I like this one but.. expensive...


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Old 11-28-2007, 09:18 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tipstir View Post
Just get a stud finder and make sure you find the wood beam.
Tippy, if you had bothered to read any of the previous posts, or even the original post, you would know exactly how really dumb this comment is at this point.

Do you know HOW to read???
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