High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource

Go Back   High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource >
Rules HDTV Forum Gallery LINK TO US! RSS - High Def Forum AddThis Feed Button AddThis Social Bookmark Button Groups

Local HDTV Info and Reception Learn about your local HDTV stations, availability, reception issues, OTA antennas and any other local issues.

Like Tree17Likes

Solid Signal Own Brand

Reply
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-09-2014, 08:37 PM   #61  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Eastern Idaho
Posts: 3,103
Default

Nice work Pete! Do you know the relationship between SNR and actual signal strength? A 3 dB increase in SNR would result in more than a 3 dB increase in signal strength but how much more?
IDRick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2014, 09:13 PM   #62  
Pete
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 265
Default

IDRick,

That sounds like more of a holl_ands question that a Pete question. As I understand it, all things being equal, raising the transmitted signal power by 3 dB would improve my receive SNR by 3 dB. Assuming the propagation path remains the same; attenuating at the square of the distance. Not sure that’s even a usable assumption with my 1 & 2-Edge signals.

It gets a little more complicated at my end when I add a second antenna with no increase in transmitted signal power. I’m adding the gain of the second antenna, but it picks up the same noise as the first one so no increase in signal to noise there. But I’m also combining the gains of the two antennas (or SNR’s) so I should see a doubling of the signal strength = 3 dB improvement. That would also suggest a 3 dB improvement in SNR. Unfortunately, there is loss in the cables, connectors and combiner so the actual realization is going to be somewhat less. I’m not seeing a linear improvement in my dual antenna tests. Typically I see a 1 dB (26%) to 2.5 dB (78%) SNR improvement, depending on channel number (frequency). I’m also not seeing a linear correlation between improvement in signal strength and SNR on a given channel. I assume due to various multipath and fading mechanisms. I am hoping that the much wider capture area of the dual 8-Bay HDB8-X’s will result in some additional diversity gain not afforded by the dual 91XG’s.
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-2014, 10:13 PM   #63  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Eastern Idaho
Posts: 3,103
Default

Pete,

I know a way you can test the relationship between SNR and signal strength. Send me a PM with your address. I have some attenuators (1, 2, 3, 5, 10, 20 dB) that I could send you if you're interesting in giving my idea a try.

Assuming you have an easy location to add attenuators while retaining your SNR reading, one could generate a simple relationship between SNR and signal strength. Simply add attenuators and track SNR. Generate the table below:

Attenuator SNR
0
5
10
keep adding attenuators until you lose the channel picture.
Plot with SNR on the Y axis and attenuation on X axis.

Sound like something you are interested in trying?

I used a similar test approach to compare signal strength with my Apex 502 converter box and margin over dropout (see graph).
Attached Images
File Type: jpg the cliff effect.jpg (36.0 KB, 8 views)
IDRick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2014, 12:50 AM   #64  
Pete
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 265
Default

IDRick,

I need between 15 & 16 dB for my Hauppauge tuners to decode an ATSC signal. Anything less than that and the SNR meter just registers “0”. My software defined radios on the other hand displays signals that are way too weak (or corrupt) for the Hauppauge tuners to decode. So if I understand what you’re suggesting you are using attenuators to reduce a known signal strength to the point where the signal is lost. By subtracting the total amount of attenuation from the known signal strength you can establish the digital cliff level for a particular tuner (DUT). If my signals were LOS, then I could establish my “margin to dropout”.

As the graphic I posted earlier shows, this morning I was experiencing anywhere from 0 to as much as 14 dB change in signal strength in a 2 hour period. It takes me at least 20 minutes to lower the tower, make a change and then raise the tower. That’s assuming I’ve already run power to the winch, released the guy wires and haven’t disturbed the antenna alignment in the process.

That’s a very generous offer and I truly appreciate it. I already have 1, 3 & 6 dB inline attenuators so I have the capability to mix & match up to 10 dB. I possibly could use my 55 dB notch filter on channel 26 (my only LOS signal) with the attenuators but I can receive that channel with a paper clip or by attaching a short length of coax to my tuner so even with all of your attenuators I don’t think I would have enough.

I’ll send you my contact information so we can talk offline if you want to. Again, thanks for the offer but don’t send anything yet.
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2014, 09:19 PM   #65  
Pete
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 265
Default One Happy Camper

It only got up to 94 deg. today so I bit the bullet and dropped the tower and installed my new HDB8-X. Winds kicked up this afternoon so I didn’t hookup the Y10 7-13 or tape off any of the connections. I just pulled it back up and guyed it off. Hopefully tomorrow morning I can drop it back down and finish the job.

To connect the antennas, I pulled the frequency mixer off the bottom antenna and looped its cables back up to the top. I left the top (new) antennas frequency mixer mounted and used a right angle ‘F’ connector to rout its output to the back. I used an ‘F’ m-m barrel to connect that to the spare frequency mixer that Solid Signal gave me last year. Finally I attached the bottom antennas frequency mixer through a right angle ‘F’ connector and ‘F’ m-m barrel so as to keep the signal paths from both antennas the same length.

Frequency Mixer Install


I raised the tower & guyed it off against the wind.

Dual HDB8-X


After I aligned the antennas for maximum SNR from LA on channel 43 (2.1 CBS) I ran a comparison scan to see how the dual antennas compared to the single antenna scan I ran this morning @ 11 AM.



The blue trace is the dual antenna result. The green trace is the result I got this morning with a single HDB8-X antenna. Since in general the blue trace is riding above the green trace most of the time it appears overall the dual antennas are capturing more signal than the single antenna. I have to caveat that with a reminder that all of my signals (except channel 26) are 1 & 2-Edge signals that fluctuate rather regularly on a channel-by-channel basis. In other words, I experience frequency selective fading rather than consistent broad band degradation.

I also included a link to a high-res version of the scan comparisons.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4A...it?usp=sharing
hoopitup2000 likes this.

Last edited by Pete Higgins; 07-11-2014 at 09:34 AM..
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2014, 05:38 PM   #66  
Pete
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 265
Default Stacked HDB8-X 4-Way splitter vs. UHF Combiner results

This morning I got out early and dropped my tower to finish up yesterdayís wind shortened testing.

While I was at it, I decided to substitute a CommScope SV-4G 4-Way splitter (5-1002 MHz) for the three HDB8-X UHF ĖCombiners and see what effect that would have on FM, High VHF & UHF performance. Again, the Y10 7-13 wasnít connected so the results are strictly from combining two HDB8-Xís. Iíve provided links to the high resolution sweeps for comparisons.

In the UHF band, the UHF ĖCombiners provided noticeably better performance low & mid band and almost the same result at the high end of the band. Since I have a lot of mid-band UHF channels I ultimately decided to stick with the UHF combiner configuration.

UHF Band -4-Way Splitter vs. UHF -Combiners
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4A...it?usp=sharing


In the High VHF band, the UHF combiners surprisingly passed part of channel 7ís characteristically odd shaped signal better than the 4-Way splitter. However, the 4-Way splitter showed marginally better response across the rest of the band. This is one area that Iíve been curious about since I discovered I could receive channel 7 on the HDB8-Xís but 9, 11 & 13ís signal strength fell off badly. Not sure if the antenna configuration has a resonance in the 174 Ė 180 MHz region or the Balunís are passing that band segment and attenuating the rest of the band.

High VHF -4-Way Splitter vs. UHF -Combiners
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4A...it?usp=sharing


As might be expected, the 4-Way Splitter showed much better response across the FM band than the three UHF combiners. This result suggests that if you are sharing an HDB8-Xís signal with an FM receiver, substituting a 2-Way splitter for the supplied combiner might yield better FM performance with negligible effect on UHF. Notice also, that the channel 7 spurious response is more pronounced using the UHF combiners. Winegard can say what they want about the high dynamic range of their LNA-200 but Iím still seeing evidence of it overloading.

FM Band -4-Way Splitter vs. UHF -Combiners
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4A...it?usp=sharing

I also took a screen shot of my Samsung TVís signal strength meter when my Hauppaugeís SNR meter was registering a stable 17.8 dB SNR for RF channel 43 (2.1, CBS).

Samsung UN46B8000 TV @17.8 SNR
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4A...it?usp=sharing

I reconnected the Y10 7-13, weather proofed everything and the tower is back up and guyed off. I hope sharing this experiment is of some benefit/interest to others.
IDRick likes this.
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2014, 02:28 PM   #67  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Eastern Idaho
Posts: 3,103
Default



Very well done Pete! Awesome write up as well.
IDRick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2014, 07:34 PM   #68  
Pete
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 265
Default A simple test to try & correlate SNR with changes in signal strength

IDRick & All,

Today I ran a simple test to try & correlate SNR with changes (increase) in signal strength. First, I aimed the antenna at San Diego and then I replaced the amplifier and power inserter with F-81 F-F barrels. The unamplified cable length approaches 200’ so I had to use the stronger San Diego UHF stations to even be able to run this test.

Next, I installed an empty Hauppauge database (C:>Users>Public>WinTV>Channel Database>hcwChanDB_5.mdb) to limit my test channels to just what was received today. I scanned in the channels with my HVR-1800 tuner to add them to the empty database and then used my Software Defined Radio (SDR) spectrum analyzer to sweep and log the unamplified signal strengths. Next, I recorded the Hauppauge Signal Monitor SNR’s for each channel.

Once I’d collected all the unamplified data, I swapped the F-81 F-F barrels for a PCT MA2-M +15 dB amplifier and power inserter. I rescanned to see if the amp would give me any more channels.

This Excel graphic displays the recorded signal strengths and corresponding SNR data.


High VHF channel 7 (from LA) was received on both tests and showed a +4.5 dB change in SNR with a +10.5 dB increase in signal strength due to adding the amplifier.

High VHF

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B4AM...it?usp=sharing

UHF was a mixed bag and seems support my impression that at least with my 1 & 2-Edge signals I can’t see a direct correlation between artificially increasing signal strength and Signal-to-Noise Ratio.

Channel 18 (51.1 KUSI) actually showed a better SNR value unamplified (20.9 unamplified to 17.8 amplified). This is probably because it is adjacent to channel 19 (69.1-3 KSWB) which just booms in from San Diego. Unamplified channel 19 had an SNR of 29.8 (my SNR meter maxes out @ 30) and of course the amplified SNR value only appeared to improved .2 dB because of that meter limitation. Channel 26 (24.1-4 KVCR) is 3.5 miles out my back door and even with the antenna pointed 123 deg. away from it, it still booms in. Notice that adding the amplifier reduced the SNR by .6 dB even though the signal strength improved by 10 dB. The very weak low power channel 37 (50.1-3 KSDY-LD) showed a +7 dB improvement in SNR with the amplifier but I couldn’t see any improvement in signal strength. Finally, channel 46 (3.1 XHTJB) out of Tijuana, Mexico showed a 10 dB improvement in SNR with an +8 dB increase in amplified signal strength.

UHF

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4A...it?usp=sharing

So adding an amplifier (TODAY) appeared to improve the SNR’s of weak signals that are probably getting lost in the distribution cable (unless the amplifier promotes adjacent channel interference).

The best part is, I only had two 5 minute trips to the roof on this 99 deg. day!
IDRick likes this.

Last edited by Pete Higgins; 07-13-2014 at 07:40 PM..
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-25-2014, 01:50 PM   #69  
Pete
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 265
Default Dual HDB8-X TV Array to Winegard HD-6065 FM Band Test

hoopitup2000 & projectsho89,

Back in May hoopitup2000 asked about the range of my Winegard HD-6065 10 Element FM Antenna.

Quote:
What kind of range does the 6065 see under normal conditions?
As Iíve alluded to many times, my LA signals arrive via a 1 or 2-edge path so conditions vary over time. However, today I did a simple test on KKGO a Country Music station I sometimes listen to from LA. According to FM Fool, the station is 52.4 miles, bearing 292 deg. which puts it on Mt. Wilson with the majority of my TV towers. I already had my array pointed towards LA and I can switch my Software Defined Radio (SDR) between the TV antennas and the FM antenna with a coaxial switch.

I tuned in KKGO on the TV array (2 HDB8-Xís, Y10 7-13, UVSJ to LNA-200) and took a screen shot. Then I switched to the FM feed (Winegard HD-6065, RCA TVPRAMP1R amplifier set for separate inputs with the FM trap off and the UHF input terminated in 75 ohms) and took another screen shot.





As can be seen from the attached screen shots, switching to the FM antenna system improves signal reception by ~16 dB. While this doesnít give you the range improvement per say it does illustrate the improvement in signal strength achieved by the 10 element FM band specific Yagi.

As can also be seen, most of the FM band signals are received sufficiently strong enough to be perfectly useable with the TV array so I usually leave that switched to my FM receivers. What canít be seen is that on a lot of the non-LA FM stations I get distortion with the FM antenna and clear signals with the TV antenna array unless I point the FM antenna towards the desired station. Another words, if the signal is strong enough & clear from the TV array itís too much hassle to keep turning the FM antenna.

High resolution image:

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B4AM...GtvM1FPeXN5Zm8
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2016, 10:10 PM   #70  
What is HD?
 

Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 2
Default Is the Xtreme Signal HDB8X-NI 8-Bay at total FRAUD?

I purchased the Xtreme Signal HDB8X-NI 8-Bay antenna specifically for its bi-directional reception capabilities. In the Silicon Valley, some signals come from San Francisco's Sutro tower to the Northwest and some, such as Fox, come from the Dumbarton Bridge in Fremont, to the South East. I got many channels when one antenna pointed to Sutro and a handful of channels when pointed to Fremont/Dumbarton Bridge.

However, when I connected both sides of the antenna for the bidirectional capabilities, I received only a couple channels. The two antennas seemed to cancel each other out. This is consistent with Pete Higgins' report, published above.

I tried to email Xtreme Signal and waited months but there was no reply. It was a dead letter box.

I called the tech support number which was the number of an outsourced support company and it pushed every call to a voice mail box that was full so that you could not talk to a human or even leave a voice mail.

Thus I have two questions:
1) Is the Xtreme Signal HDB8X-NI 8-Bay a complete fraud, making false statements about the bidirectional reception capabilities?

2) Is there a strong bi-directional digital antenna that will actually work? If so, which one?

thx,
SplitSignal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2016, 12:12 AM   #71  
Pete
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 265
Default Re: Is the Xtreme Signal HDB8X-NI 8-Bay at total FRAUD?

Rick,

No, I've found it to be a very capable 8-Bay -with the panels aligned. I currently have two stacked to receive 1 & 2 Edge LA signals and one pointed to receive San Diego signals.

There are a lot of technical reasons why performance degrades when the panels aren't aligned, and combined, so in that sense you may be a victim of optimistic advertising. Obviously, your going from an 8-Bay pointed at the signal to a 4-Bay (i.e. cutting the signal strength in half). Also, phase cancellation can take place further degrading signal quality.

Most recommend either a rotor or two separate antennas & down leads, fed through a coaxial switch.
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2016, 12:37 AM   #72  
What is HD?
 

Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 2
Default

Pete,

4 Bays each pointing in different directions. That's what the bi-directional is supposed to do, right?

With only one side of the antenna connected, it worked fine as a uni-directional antenna. Its when both sides were plugged in to the integrated signal mixer that they cancelled each other out. Thus, "optimistic advertising" is too kind a term for a company that over promises, collects your money and then turns off their phones.

I've tried omni-directional antennas and they were not strong enough. I would still like to get rid of Comcast after the Stanley Cup. Is there a true, bi-directional antenna that works?
SplitSignal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2016, 01:51 PM   #73  
Pete
 
Pete Higgins's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California, 58 miles @112 degrees from Mt. Wilson
Posts: 265
Default Re: Is the Xtreme Signal HDB8X-NI 8-Bay at total FRAUD?

Quote:
Pete,

4 Bays each pointing in different directions. That's what the bi-directional is supposed to do, right? ĖYES

With only one side of the antenna connected, it worked fine as a uni-directional antenna. Its when both sides were plugged in to the integrated signal mixer that they cancelled each other out. Thus, "optimistic advertising" is too kind a term for a company that over promises, collects your money and then turns off their phones. As far as I know, no antenna(s) can defy the laws of physics. This goes for the HDB8X as well as the DB8e and others of similar construction.

I've tried omni-directional antennas and they were not strong enough. I would still like to get rid of Comcast after the Stanley Cup. Is there a true, bi-directional antenna that works? Again, at my location I couldnít feed multiple locations to a common combiner/coax successfully. I tried the 4-Bay panels oriented for San Diego & LA, isolated them with amplifiers and even tried two 91 XGís. Isolating with amplifiers showed the most promise, but using two separate feeds works even better so thatís how Iíve been configured for the last couple of years.
Rick,

As I said in post #37,

"Once I got the panels aligned to both markets, I lost almost all of my stations from each market. There were two reasons for this; (1) My signals are all 1 & 2 Edge and are very weak (-93 to -112.9 dBm) and switching from an 8-Bay to a 4-Bay yielded roughly half the signal strength for stations from each market. (2) When the panels are oriented in different directions half the signal received on one panel is reradiated out by the other panel further reducing what gets delivered to the tuner. Think of the receiving panel being a lower power transmitter connected to the other panel and the combiner. Half the signal goes through the combiner to the tuner and the other half is reradiated by the other panel. This re-radiation loss further reduced the available signal to my tuner. In very round numbers, it cut the signal delivered to the tuner to ľ of the 8-Bay level.

I was able to solve the re-radiation (2) issue by inserting an amplifier in each line between the antenna terminals and the combiner, effectively isolating one panel from the other. Fortunately, the HDB8X combiner passes power on both ports so this was easy to accomplish. That restored all of my channels. Unfortunately, I would sometimes loose channels that had been 100% reliable with the 8-Bay. I attribute that to the lower gain of a 4-Bay.

I was fortunate that I had two separate RG-6 lines running from the antenna into the house so I could compare 8-Bay performance to 4-Bay performance and simultaneously 4-Bay performance from each market. Obviously, if your signals are strong enough from both your markets to tolerate the loses mentioned above and still deliver usable signal strength to your tuner you should be just fine."

It appears in your case, your signals wonít tolerate that much loss. -Sorry
Pete Higgins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 08:31 AM   #74  
Sev
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 172
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Higgins View Post
hoopitup2000 & projectsho89,

Thanks for the compliments, I try. In fact my wife often says I’m very trying!

The FM antenna is a Winegard HD-6065 10 Element FM Antenna aligned with my high VHF & UHF TV antennas so I kind of know where the rotor is pointing them. It feeds the VHF side of an RCA TVPRAMP1R amplifier set for separate inputs with the FM trap off and the UHF input terminated in 75 ohms.

I have an early 60’s Sansui model 1000 A (all tube type) AM/FM stereo receiver, a Fisher FM-871 AM/FM stereo synthesizer tuner and a JVC R-X 80 digital synthesized stereo AM/FM receiver. I also have Hauppauge HVR-1800 ATSC & clear QAM TV/FM tuner cards in several of my computers and lately I’ve been using my new Software Defined Radios (SDR’s) with a program called SDR Sharp (SDR#) which gives a spectrum & waterfall display and has quite good sound when fed through a quality audio amplifier to decent stereo speakers.

Unfortunately, I have FM stations arriving from 14 deg. all the way around the compass to 350 deg. The HD-6065 beam pattern is narrow enough to exclude most of them. I generally leave the FM receivers connected to the TV antennas, which generally yields 360 deg. coverage for about 60-70 % of the stations. To get some of the weaker LA (53 miles) and most San Diego (76 miles) stations I switch (I use lots of coaxial switches) to the Winegard HD-6065 and point it. It really deserves its own mast & rotor but I’ll never buy another one of the current 3-Wire models. They constantly go out of calibration. You can point my 50 year old Radio Shack and RCA rotors in the blind and they are dead-nuts on every time. The one on my push-up mast has been there since 1980 and the only repair was to splice in a new length of outdoor control wire.

I just bought my second 91XG a couple of months ago & put it up, so, no I’ve never tried them in a horizontal stack. I was looking to increase gain primarily on RF channel 43 (2.1-3, CBS) and (hopefully) cut down on multi-path (mostly ground bounce) by narrowing the vertical beam width. I sit in the shadow of Box Springs Mtn. and have to point over it to receive LA but am wide open to the sides & rear. The horizontal beam width of a single 91XG is already pretty narrow so I didn’t think tightening it further would be advantageous.

Last night we watched the channel 2 news off the HDB8-X and this cloudy, overcast morning it’s booming in with an SNR of 21.9. Usually on days like this I couldn’t even get it to register. Channel 36 (4.1 & 2, NBC) which I almost never got from a single 91XG and rarely got from the dual 91XG’s is coming in @ 19.8-20.8 so it seems like I’ve gained a lot on CBS and lost a little for NBC. Last night I had channel 38 (30.1-6, ION) max out the signal strength meter on my Samsung UN46 B8000 and this morning its SNR is a steady 27.1.
Hi Pete.
Thanks for a wonderful thread.

I am currently laying the groundwork for putting up a tilt tower and stacked antennas. This thread touched on a wide range of questions that have been in the back of my head.
However, my question is a bit more mundane, concerning rotor hardware.
I am in Eastern TN in a hollow. Due to the orientation of the hills and mountains we often have winds trucking through here on a regular basis.
My worry is that the antennas will be thrown out of alignment on a regular basis.
Since new products are rarely made as good old ones.
What would you recommend for an older rotor that will stand up well to the torque created by wind passing through the antennas?

Thank you.
Sev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2016, 01:52 PM   #75  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1,243
Default

If your budget permits, get a rotor intended for amateur radio (ham) operators.
projectsho89 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Go Back   High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource >
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


to Solid Signal Own Brand
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Anybody deal with "East Coast TV's"? djcee73 The High Definition Lounge 2206 11-29-2016 07:52 PM
Seeking advice on a weekend DIY antenna project tbone937 Local HDTV Info and Reception 8 08-04-2012 07:14 PM
tigerbangs prescription for deep fringe reception rbinck Local HDTV Info and Reception 1174 03-22-2012 05:20 PM
OTA - Roof Top Suggestions Patrick_D Local HDTV Info and Reception 15 07-21-2009 07:26 PM
Please post your Solid Signal frustrations here!! 1happyguy Local HDTV Info and Reception 51 07-20-2009 07:51 AM
Samsung Introduces LCD Line w/ 100,000:1 Contrast Ratio SGMD1 High Definition News & Informative Articles 24 09-19-2007 09:38 AM
Why the Toshiba HD DVD rocks-literally HDMI Fantastic HD DVD Players and Discs 68 01-28-2007 11:17 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:17 PM.



Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004 - 2018, MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands