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Yamaha vs. Onkyo & Others for Home Theater Upgrade

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Old 02-20-2012, 02:44 PM   #1  
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Default Yamaha vs. Onkyo & Others for Home Theater Upgrade

I purchased the Yamaha RX-V671. After I got home and checked it out, I'm not sure this is what I want. I chose this unit because it will work with the 4ohm front channel speakers that I have (Boston Acoustics A400's). After reading what I see on this Forum, I think I need to upgrade to 6-8 ohm speakers. I also see alot of posts for the Onkyo receivers. Is it just coinsidence, or is it because Onkyo gives you more bang for the buck?
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Old 02-20-2012, 02:54 PM   #2  
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FYI - I don't know about your yamaha but onkyo receivers (at least both my 600 and 900 models) have settings for either 4 ohm or 6 and above ohms speakers but note with either all your speakers impedance (ohm ratings must match - you can not mix and match different ohms in your system.
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Old 02-20-2012, 03:21 PM   #3  
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FYI - I don't know about your yamaha but onkyo receivers (at least both my 600 and 900 models) have settings for either 4 ohm or 6 and above ohms speakers but note with either all your speakers impedance (ohm ratings must match - you can not mix and match different ohms in your system.

What's your opinion on the Onkyo receivers? The Yamaha instructions give the option to set the front channel impedence to 4 ohm, so I think my speakers will work. But if I can get a better system with an Onkyo receiver and new 8 ohm fronts, I might go that way. I also have a power amp that I want to use for the fronts but the Yamaha wont let me do that.
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Old 02-20-2012, 04:01 PM   #4  
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Onkyo's have the best bang for buck, that's why many people are buying them. as far as mixing impedence I really don't know of any amp that will allow what you intend. maybe another member will have more info. on an amp like you descirbe.
Onkyo has settings for different impedence, but as far as I know, all speakers must be equal. 4-6-8 ohms. do google search for ohm's law.
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Old 07-28-2012, 02:14 PM   #5  
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Default Ohm my God

I have a Yamaha RX V1600. It has ohm settings. choose 6-ohm if your speakers are 6 ohms or higher and 8 ohms for speakers of 8 ohm and higher. My fronts are A/D/S B7 monitors 4 ohms(I just looked) and my center(P.S.B Alpha) and rears(Energy Pro Series .5's) are 8 ohms. I chose the 6 ohm setting and they all seem to be functioning perfectly.
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Old 07-30-2012, 05:21 AM   #6  
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I have a Yamaha RX V1600. It has ohm settings. choose 6-ohm if your speakers are 6 ohms or higher and 8 ohms for speakers of 8 ohm and higher. My fronts are A/D/S B7 monitors 4 ohms(I just looked) and my center(P.S.B Alpha) and rears(Energy Pro Series .5's) are 8 ohms. I chose the 6 ohm setting and they all seem to be functioning perfectly.
You need to run all the same impedances - what you are doing is unsafe and could potentially cause your receiver to malfunction or worse start a fire.!!!!
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Old 08-05-2012, 06:56 AM   #7  
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You should not have any problems running 4 ohm and 8 ohm together, as long as the overall load is not too much for the amps. Now keep in mind that if everything else is equal, an 8 ohm speaker will play 3db lower in volume. The amp will deliver 1/2 the power into 8 ohm as it will into 4 ohm.

If you use one of the built in set ups that listens to the speakers and tunes the output to match the conditions, it should pick this up and adjust accordingly.

Also, while speakers are marked 4 ohm, 6 ohm, 8 ohm, the actual resistance is not a fixed amount over the entire frequency range. You can have 4 ohm speakers that are actually not too hard to drive and most amps will not have a problem, and yet another 4 ohm speaker that will cause problems for the same amp. But generally 4 ohm speakers will present a more difficult load then 8 ohm speakers.


Oh, also, 4 ohm or 8 ohm does not describe anything about quality or sonic performance.
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Old 03-23-2013, 10:58 AM   #8  
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If you think that's not safe..I just added 4 more speakers. 2 presence speakers and 2 surround back speakers. That's 10 total..Been a month and all seems well. Amp doesn't get hot and everything sounds even better. Besides,the internal fan seems to work fine with lots of room around the amp for ventilation.
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Old 03-23-2013, 01:07 PM   #9  
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Impedence in consumer amps is not set in stone, and will change during use. manufacturers had to put it in a standard in the late 60's, so all would be equal. Look at old ads and the specs are all different. But, it is unsafe to mix ratings as jykler stated. You are "stressing" filters and other sensitive componants by mixing - like the other op said look up ohms law. Very easy to understand.
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Old 05-02-2013, 08:47 AM   #10  
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i have a yamaha RX-V620 thats powering two front 4 ohm jamo 707i tower speakers, yamaha center 8 ohm and two small yamaha 8 ohm rear speakers. switched to 4 ohm fronts. sounds great. this is the second yamaha receiver ive owned in the last 40 years, first one i fried by touching speaker wires together. had it fixed but not by a yamaha dealer so it only lasted couple years. my RX-V620 gets used everyday for music and watching tv and movies. seeing as its only the second one ive had to buy in 40 years should tell you something. i would of bought a second one anyway when i figured i needed something that i could work with a remote control, plus the 620 has sub output and surround sound. they have some newer models that id like to pushed into buying but this old thing still cranks so ill wait until it goes, or ii find a deal on a newer model. by the way, my amp doesnt get hot when running the jamos 4 ohm and there rated at 200 watts. you have to be somewhat careful when listing to some of the advice you get here on what will work and what wont, mostly are text book knowledge, in short they have no idea what there talking about. i called yamaha and talked to there tech. after being told i couldnt run my 4 ohm 200 watt speakers with my unit. that was 6 months ago. yamaha said if i did have a problem it would take years. that would be time for a upgrade anyway. so YAMAHA all the way.
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Old 05-02-2013, 10:12 AM   #11  
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i called yamaha and talked to there tech. after being told i couldnt run my 4 ohm 200 watt speakers with my unit. that was 6 months ago. yamaha said if i did have a problem it would take years. that would be time for a upgrade anyway. so YAMAHA all the way.
The Yamaha tech even told him no! I know Jykler will back me on this one. The PO is running a very old amp like this. 40 yrs ago, things were so different, not like the amps of today, that are made using better components, and higher quality parts. If you do as he suggests, you run the risk of fire, and burning out your amp. I'm positive because of the ability of his Jamo's power intake, is causing the amp to run as it is. There are not as many or not as sensitive filters in the 40 yr. old amp. BY his own admission of running it open, with no speaker's hooked up, he admits to being uneducated in use and care of amps. Not trying to be rude! It's just a fact. Even turning on an older amp without speakers hooked up and the switch live, will damage it. Especially older amps!
The use of amps as desribed is your choice - it's your money, your stuff. But, I must advise to not take that as advice. What the manual, and the maker of the equipment tell you is what you should do. They made the thing after all.
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Old 05-20-2013, 04:54 PM   #12  
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Rxv 671 gives a option for Ohms
Great reciever

.rx-v671 receiver /netgear wireless.xbox 360.WD media player.HP laptop.jamo full surround.samsung s3 /apps for xbox,rx-v671, lg plasma,.nfc tags for quick access to each app
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Old 05-23-2013, 08:51 AM   #13  
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You need to run all the same impedances - what you are doing is unsafe and could potentially cause your receiver to malfunction or worse start a fire.!!!!
I don't think I would get that carried away. Lower impedance speakers draw more current. As long as they aren't drawing more current than the amplifiers can provide, there isn't any problem. Mixed impedances aren't an issue because each speaker has its own amplifier.

If they do draw more than the amps can provide, the amp final trasistors will overheat. If you want to try running 4 ohm speakers with a receiver just watch them to be sure the amplifier heat sinks don't get too hot to touch.

Generally, the impedance handling specifications are at full rated power. Hardly anyone uses their A/V receivers at full rated power for any meaningful length of time. In most home theaters, amplifiers rarely peak above 20 watts. I think most of them would be fine with 4 ohm loads at normal listening volumes. Just watch for overheating.
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Old 05-23-2013, 09:04 AM   #14  
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I don't think I would get that carried away. Lower impedance speakers draw more current. As long as they aren't drawing more current than the amplifiers can provide, there isn't any problem. Mixed impedances aren't an issue because each speaker has its own amplifier. I don't think this is trueIf they do draw more than the amps can provide, the amp final trasistors will overheat. If you want to try running 4 ohm speakers with a receiver just watch them to be sure the amplifier heat sinks don't get too hot to touch.

Generally, the impedance handling specifications are at full rated power. Hardly anyone uses their A/V receivers at full rated power for any meaningful length of time. In most home theaters, amplifiers rarely peak above 20 watts. I think most of them would be fine with 4 ohm loads at normal listening volumes. Just watch for overheating.
You are probably correct but as a matter of universal precaution and CORRECT practices I would never recommend mixed resistances on one cpnsumer level AVR - One question though - are you sure each speaker has it's own individual amplifier and not sharing multiple loads on a single amp?

Part of the reason I say this is I don't think many mid level avr have separate amps they share one
look at this response from AVS to somebody wondering about separate vs on board avr amps

Quote:
You also have to look at the cost, most inexpensive AVR's don't have pre-outs to hook up an outboard amp. You normally have to look at the 500.00 range and up to get the preouts. By adding say a simple two channel amp to drive your mains, frees up the AVR's built in amplifier so that is has more power to drive the other speakers. Most surounds don't require much power but if using a two channel amp to drive the mains, your AVR has alot more power to drive the center which normally accounts for 70-90% of the sound.

The more speakers you hook up to an AVR the less power to each channel you'll get, hence why most reviews claim the wpc with only two speakers hooked up. Take the Sony ES recievers rated at 120 wpc, with two channels it gets like 105 wpc, with 5 speakers that number drops to like 55 wpc and with 7 speakers your only get about 41 wpc (this is an example and not indicative of all Sony or any AVR for that matter) by adding outboard amps you give the AVR more to work with.

Take my Onkyo 805 I use outboard amps for the center and surrounds and have my mains only hooked up to the AVR because the built in amp running two channels is so powerful (171 wpc two speakers only) that it can match wits with my 200 watt monoblock for my center and my 105 wpc amps for my surrounds. I can crank it to ungodly levels with no distortion

Last edited by jkkyler; 05-23-2013 at 09:15 AM..
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Old 05-23-2013, 06:54 PM   #15  
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Yes, each has a separate amplifier - at least my two Pioneers work that way. The amplifiers, however, might share a common power supply and normally do in a receiver. That isn't necessarily a problem. While it is possible for a power supply to overheat, normally the final transistors will overheat faster and more destructively.

Understand that the power supplies, like the final transistors, are designed to deliver full rated power all channels driven. At my normal listening levels my main and center speakers are delivering somewhere around 1 to 2 watts of power on average. Peaks can run as high as 20 watts but I rarely see that since I use a powered subwoofer.

My mains and center have a fairly normal efficiency of 86 db. That means they deliver 86 db of sound pressure at one meter with one watt of power. 86 db is pretty loud. 2 watts takes it to 89 db and 4 watts takes it to 92 db. That would drive me out of the room. My receiver delivers way, way more power than I ever use. I wouldn't blink an eye about running 4 ohms per channel with either one. Actually I think the Elite is rated for 4 ohms. The low end Pioneer is not.

But if you feel more comfortable with everything at the same nominal impedance, that's fine. Certainly there is nothing wrong with that.
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