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HDTVs in Nearly a Quarter of U.S. Homes

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Old 12-11-2008, 07:16 PM   #16  
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Originally Posted by rbinck View Post
What make me suspicious of the high numbers is the % of subscribers to HD service. The last figures I heard (about a year ago) was about 15% of the subscribers had HD service. That seem like the real important survey to me, how many households watch HD, not just have the sets. That would indicate the demand and demand is what drives providers to HD.
This issue IMO, goes hand in hand with HDTV household penetration.

It isn't enough to get the consumer to buy an HDTV. Heck - that's automatic now.

The struggle is to get them to pay for HD service which is available in many different delivery systems.

And like the penetration %'s - the results are like horses**t - all over the road.

And each HD delivery system provider is being cagy about their data.
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Old 12-13-2008, 05:56 AM   #17  
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I believe that under25% of American households have HDTVs because HDTVSs are expensive when a 25" SD TV can be brought under $200 and will probably last over ten years. And SDTV looks just fine. (especially DVD, which looks excellent.) There is no need for HDTVs. Just something for the rich. Seen HDTV at the store, not super amazing like people might think.
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Old 12-14-2008, 07:55 AM   #18  
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FYI

http://www.adweek.com/aw/content_dis...b591ea7da1fdea

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NEW YORK Almost one-quarter of all U.S. television households (23.3 percent) own a high-definition TV set as of Nov. 30, Nielsen reported Thursday.

Nielsen's estimates are based on a field staff review that identified TV sets capable of receiving and displaying high-definition pictures, as well as those that are actually receiving those signals.

High-definition TV penetration in the U.S. has more than doubled since July 2007, when Nielsen began tracking HDTV status. At that time, only 10 percent of U.S. homes had access to high-definition TV.

Washington, D.C., where 31 percent of homes are HDTV-enabled, has the highest HDTV penetration of Nielsen's 18 largest local TV markets. Boston and New York follow, with HDTV penetrations of slightly more than 30 percent, respectively. Detroit has the lowest HDTV penetration: about 21 percent of homes....

Sporting events have the highest index of viewing in HDTV households, with HDTV receivable and capable homes watching 54 percent more sports than households that are not HDTV capable. Political programming and awards shows are also popular with HDTV household
Aha.

Thats the difference. 23.3% is the household number with HD service, not just HDTVs so 34% HDTV penetration might be accurate after all.

The Nielsen's studies numbers adjust downward to account for the amount of households that possess an HDTV set, but don't hook it up to a high definition broadcast source.

That makes sense for Nielsen's (not Nielsen/Videoscan) normal purpose of tracking viewership of broadcast cable and satellite advertising programming and commercial viewership, and now tracking high definition channels , programming and advertising separate from standard definition stuff.

So 22.3% is about the amount of households that have a HDTV and hook it up to high definition programming. The larger number of 34% is people that have an HDTV in their households. So 34% -23.3 % = 10.7 % are people that have an HDTV put don't have a high definition broadcast source hooked up to it.

34.0 % HDTV penetration
24.3 % HDTV hooked up to Nielsen tracked HDTV programming
10.7 % HDTV not hooked to broadcast HD, watching standard def, DVDs or Blu-ray or HD DVD (RIP) or available to view Over The Air free HD signals but they have not bothered to yet (might with the DTV transition in Feb as they have OTA ATSC tuners in their sets)

The greater universe of 34% household penetration is currently available for Blu-ray to hook to, and the 10.7% might be attractive for Blu-ray to market to as they do not have an HD source yet.
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Old 12-14-2008, 07:56 AM   #19  
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Default Actual Nielsen press release on HDTV and active usage of HD programming

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http://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/...2008-final.pdf

PENETRATION OF HIGH DEFINITION TELEVISION EXCEEDS 23%, NIELSEN REPORTS

New York, NY, December 11, 2008 – With the Holiday electronics-buying season approaching, Nielsen today reported that, as of November 30, the penetration of high definition television (HDTV) reached 23.3% of all U.S. television households.

When Nielsen began tracking HDTV status in its People Meter samples in July of 2007, only 10% of homes had HDTV and this percentage has increased in each subsequent month (see Table 1).

Steve McGowan, Senior Vice President Client Research Initiatives said, “The accelerated penetration of HDTV can be attributed to a number of factors, including the lower prices for high definition television equipment, the increased availability of high definition programming, and purchases of new television sets in anticipation of the digital transition set for February of 2009.

With nearly a quarter of homes equipped with high definition televisions, the demand for high definition content will only increase.”

Among the 18 largest local markets, Washington, D.C. has the highest HDTV penetration, with 31.1% of homes receiving high definition. Boston and New York follow with penetrations of 30.5% and 30.2%, respectively. Detroit has the lowest HDTV penetration: 20.9% of homes (see Table 2).

Nielsen also looked at the types of programming that are most popular in households that are receive HDTV signals, comparing that to households without HDTV capability. Sporting events have the highest index of viewing in HDTV households, with HDTV receivable and capable homes watching 54% more sports than households that are not HDTV capable (see Table 3).

Other genres that are popular with HDTV households include political programming (25% more popular) and awards shows (10% more popular).

Nielsen’s HDTV estimates are available nationally and for all 56 metered markets.

The estimates are based on Nielsen Field staff review of all equipment to identify TV sets that are capable of receiving and displaying high definition pictures, as well as those that are actually receiving those signals.
Code:
Total U.S. HDTV Penetration
Trend By Household HD % 

2007
July        10.0% 
August      10.5% 
September   11.3%
October     12.1%
November    12.8%
December    13.5%%

2008 
January     14.5% 
February    15.3%
March       16.2%
April       17.1%
May         18.1%
June        18.9%
July        19.6%
August      20.4%
September   21.3%
October     22.2%
November    23.3%
Code:
HDTV Penetration in Local
People Meter Markets – November 2008 %

Washington, DC (Hagerstown) 31.1%
Boston (Manchester) 30.5%
New York 30.2%
Seattle-Tacoma 29.8%
Philadelphia 29.1%
Los Angeles 28.9%
Chicago 27.0%
Phoenix 26.9%
San Francisco-Oak-San Jose 26.8%
Tampa-St. Pete (Sarasota) 26.7%
Denver 26.4%
Atlanta 25.7%
Dallas-Ft. Worth 25.0%
Houston 23.7%
Cleveland - Akron 23.6%
Minneapolis - St. Paul 21.6%
Miami-Ft. Lauderdale 21.4%
Detroit 20.9%
So pretty much the larger cities have more HDTV households that also hook up those sets to active HDTV programming
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Old 12-14-2008, 07:57 AM   #20  
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Big chance in HDTV usage (with HD sources) for these dates significant for Blu-ray
Code:
Total U.S. HDTV Penetration
Trend By Household HD % 

2007
July        10.0% 
August      10.5% 
September   11.3%
October     12.1%
November    12.8%
December    13.5%%

2008 
January     14.5% 
February    15.3%
March       16.2%
April       17.1%
May         18.1%
June        18.9%
July        19.6%
August      20.4%
September   21.3%
October     22.2%
November    23.3%
The growth of HDTV usage between last year and when the format war ended and now is significant. That obviously has enabled Blu-ray purchases as well.
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Old 12-14-2008, 07:58 AM   #21  
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We were having the same discussion at High Def Digest and I found the actual press release from Nielsen in my business email this morning, so I thought I'd post it here as well.

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Old 12-14-2008, 09:09 AM   #22  
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Originally Posted by Chris Gerhard View Post
Obviously all of these estimates are from statistical surveys and I don't know which are scientific and which are not, but I might take a few minutes here later and track down more claims but I call complete and total BS on any number less than 35% now...
Nielsen gets its number from the 4000 households they directly survey. So when they say "24% have HD sets" what they mean is that 960 of their 4000 homes have HD an then extrapolate.

It's exactly the same method that is used to determine that 40% of America watched the Super Bowl last year, or that 5% watched CSI last week. And yes that is considered a scientific survey.
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Old 12-14-2008, 12:05 PM   #23  
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Nielsen gets its number from the 4000 households they directly survey. So when they say "24% have HD sets" what they mean is that 960 of their 4000 homes have HD an then extrapolate.

It's exactly the same method that is used to determine that 40% of America watched the Super Bowl last year, or that 5% watched CSI last week. And yes that is considered a scientific survey.
I don't think that only the Nielsen sample households were included.

There is a lot of scientific validity to Nielsen's methodology, and at least its mostly consistent over time.
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Old 12-14-2008, 02:37 PM   #24  
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Originally Posted by Kosty View Post
I don't think that only the Nielsen sample households were included.

There is a lot of scientific validity to Nielsen's methodology, and at least its mostly consistent over time.
Those two statements are true, but there are lots of people who have questioned the accuracy of their conclusions (including the television networks!). In the end, they all decided to accept Nielsen as a baseline because it is consistent (though of unknown accuracy) and the networks couldn't afford to run their own sampling, or get advertisers to believe their statistics instead of an independent third party.

The murky question here is what does Nielsen mean by "TV sets capable of receiving and displaying high-definition pictures, as well as those that are actually receiving those signals."?

Does that mean "TV sets capable of receiving and displaying high-definition pictures which are also actually receiving those signals" (i.e. only people with HDTV's who are watching HD content)?

Or "TV sets capable of receiving and displaying high-definition pictures, as well as TV sets capable of receiving and displaying high-definition pictures that are also actually receiving those signals" (i.e. people with HDTV's who are not watching HD content and people with HDTV's who are)?

And what does "actually receiving those signals" mean? OTA? Cable? SAT? Blu-Ray? Some combination?

Murky.
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Old 12-15-2008, 02:45 AM   #25  
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I believe that under25% of American households have HDTVs because HDTVSs are expensive when a 25" SD TV can be brought under $200 and will probably last over ten years. And SDTV looks just fine. (especially DVD, which looks excellent.) There is no need for HDTVs. Just something for the rich. Seen HDTV at the store, not super amazing like people might think.
Troll alert?

Whatever floats your boat, (or as I suspect) wallet in this case. Um, this be the HighDef Forum, and you be barking up the wrong tree.

Tell ya what. If you can't tell the difference between a 1080p HDTV playing a Blu-Ray movie, and SDTV, I'd strongly suggest getting your vision checked.

SDTVs are going the way of the dinosaurs, just like CRT TVs. I did notice in my trip into HHGregg yesterday, there's nary a CRT to be found in the store.
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Old 12-27-2008, 02:55 AM   #26  
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Troll alert?

Whatever floats your boat, (or as I suspect) wallet in this case. Um, this be the HighDef Forum, and you be barking up the wrong tree.

Tell ya what. If you can't tell the difference between a 1080p HDTV playing a Blu-Ray movie, and SDTV, I'd strongly suggest getting your vision checked.

SDTVs are going the way of the dinosaurs, just like CRT TVs. I did notice in my trip into HHGregg yesterday, there's nary a CRT to be found in the store.
I can see a difference between a tdhv and sdtv. The pixels look very fine in colors very vibrent on hdtvs. The pixels are noticably larger and
colors duller on an sd crt tv. Just blu-ray is not worth the money when dvd looks fine.
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Old 12-27-2008, 07:13 AM   #27  
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Troll alert?

Whatever floats your boat, (or as I suspect) wallet in this case. Um, this be the HighDef Forum, and you be barking up the wrong tree.

Tell ya what. If you can't tell the difference between a 1080p HDTV playing a Blu-Ray movie, and SDTV, I'd strongly suggest getting your vision checked.

SDTVs are going the way of the dinosaurs, just like CRT TVs. I did notice in my trip into HHGregg yesterday, there's nary a CRT to be found in the store.
Just a funny note: I was in my local Walmart the other day and SD CRT TV's were literally flying off the shelves. I thought they were giving them away with all of the traffic but alas they were selling them and not at a special price.
It just goes to show that many consumers don't care about HD or widescreen at all.
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Old 12-27-2008, 06:01 PM   #28  
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Just a funny note: I was in my local Walmart the other day and SD CRT TV's were literally flying off the shelves. I thought they were giving them away with all of the traffic but alas they were selling them and not at a special price.
It just goes to show that many consumers don't care about HD or widescreen at all.
Your Wal-Mart still sells SD CRTs? My local Wal-Mart doesn't even sell CRTs of anymore, TVs or computer monitors.
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Old 12-28-2008, 08:28 AM   #29  
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Your Wal-Mart still sells SD CRTs? My local Wal-Mart doesn't even sell CRTs of anymore, TVs or computer monitors.
I do not know 1 person who has purchased a new CRT in the last year. Nor have I been to 1 store where I saw a CRT at the checkout. In fact - the only CRT's I ever see are open boxes or maybe cheesy dollar stores.

Regarding the HDTV %'s. It's hard to judge really. Each person has their own sampling method. Example - at the place I work (granted, we only have 15 fulltime) I am the only one with an HDTV. So, I guess that would be 6% or so. In my family (brothers, sisters, folks, aunts, uncles) 3 HDTV's 8 households. 37% I think everyone that comments on the penetration bases their opinions on what they see or feel. Me included. My gut feeling is that if MY DAD has an HDTV, there are likely a hell of a lot of households across the nation with one too.
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Old 12-28-2008, 08:37 AM   #30  
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Originally Posted by HD Goofnut View Post
Your Wal-Mart still sells SD CRTs? My local Wal-Mart doesn't even sell CRTs of anymore, TVs or computer monitors.
Yes it does, amazing isn't it. Very poor Hispanic population here and it seems many like the CRT's. Hell I have even seen a person buy a NEW SD CRT and apply one of those plastic Fresnel magnifying screens to the front to make the picture look larger (and distorted of course) and they thought it was great (and cheap). He said "look I got me some HD for cheap".

Just goes to show you that some (in my area many) just don't care about higher quality.
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