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'HDTV in the Home' University Survey

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Old 10-03-2007, 09:36 PM   #1  
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Default 'HDTV in the Home' University Survey

The ‘HDTV in the Home’ survey is being conducted by Jeff Bird, a professor in Film & TV at Swinburne University, Australia, as part of his PhD study at the University of Melbourne, Australia. It is NOT a commercial survey and all responses are anonymous. The focus of the study is High Def users in the United States and Australia. Please tell him what you think about your HD set and your HD viewing experience! Results of the survey will be reported back to forum users at a later date.

The link to the survey is:
http://opinio.online.swin.edu.au/s?s=2906

To all those who complete the survey, many thanks for your time and thoughts. And thanks to the High Def Forum for supporting the survey.

Jeff
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Old 10-04-2007, 06:19 AM   #2  
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"Professor" doesn't even come before "PHD" in the dictionary.

Flawed, sophomoric survey, certainly not of very high academic standards; perhaps an extra credit project for high school sociology class.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:24 AM   #3  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billinprinceto View Post
"Professor" doesn't even come before "PHD" in the dictionary.

Flawed, sophomoric survey, certainly not of very high academic standards; perhaps an extra credit project for high school sociology class.
So, did you do the survey?
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Old 10-04-2007, 09:58 AM   #4  
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have to do it to see it all - but I cheated
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Old 10-04-2007, 07:03 PM   #5  
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Like all on-line surveys, it is in no way, shape, or form, scientific.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:02 PM   #6  
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I thought the survey was well designed. The results would be interesting to see.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:25 PM   #7  
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I thought the survey was well designed. The results would be interesting to see.
Doesn't make it scientific however. It is a voluntary survey. It is not a random sample.
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Old 10-04-2007, 08:58 PM   #8  
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Well that's stating the obvious. All survey's are voluntary, especially ones dealing with the general public. Pretty hard to do a random sample on High Def viewers. As long as the guy acknowledges that the sample is not random in his analysis, then I think the data is still useful. Being overly 'scientific' might mean that you actually learn nothing from the real world.
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Old 10-05-2007, 07:38 AM   #9  
What's all this, then?...
 
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It *can* give you an accurate picture of a particular slice of reality, just don't extrapolate and imagine it applies to a broad range of people.

"Voluntary", in this case, means the people *chose* to respond, not they were *willing* to respond.

People who actively seek to respond to surveys, especially to on-line surveys, represent a particular demographic, with particular traits, that are not characteristic of consumers in general. Typical consumers would usually choose not to spend their time on something like that although they might be wiling to answer survey questions in a direct, one-on-one survey with a person conducting it, especially if there is some premium involved for their participation.
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Old 10-07-2007, 09:57 PM   #10  
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Default Response to BilliPrinceto

Thank you to everyone replying to the survey, the response has been outstanding. I really appreciate you taking the time. The comments left throughout the survey responses are especially good.

I also just want to respond to BillinPrinceto. (warning: the following is very boring, most people won't want to waste their time reading it!) Sorry that you found the survey not to your liking, which is fine, since this whole exercise is about feedback. However, I feel it necessary to point out a few issues. While we don't use the term "sophomoric" in Australia, I presume it is derogatory. As far as a flawed survey goes, it is not the intention to make this a 'scientific' study, it is a qualitative study. I am less interested in gathering a wide sample (not possible with HDTV set owners anyway) based on preconceived ideas and mathematically imposing a scientific model on survey respondents. I'd rather get 100 quality responses with comments, in which people are able to have their opinions heard and properly considered. I believe strongly in respecting the in depth feedback provided by respondents and only formulating an idea of what it all means based on what they tell me.

Secondly, regarding your comments about the overall academic standard, it is worth noting that at least 20 experts, both academic and from the television/HD industry, assisted in shaping the final form of this survey. In terms of academia, the survey was the product of a rigorous 4 month ethics approval process, in which methodology was a key component. And while I personally don't put much stock in rankings and titles, you may like to know that this university faculty is ranked 7th in the world in terms of research reputation (London Times Education Supplement). Personally I have been writing about HD, as well as producing High Def television programming, since the beginning of the decade. I was recently listed in Who's Who in the World for my research on HDTV.

You also seem stressed by the use of the term ‘professor’ without a PhD. Again, you are incorrect here, since in Australia it’s commonplace to have professors in the creative arts/industries without PhDs. This is due to the fact that there are very few creative practitioners with industry credits/accomplishments who hold PhDs. How many credited filmmakers do you know with a PhD? In my particular case, I am officially a Lecturer in Film and TV, although that will not mean much to a U.S. audience, since you use terms such as professor, associate professor and assistant professor. There is currently debate here in Australia about bringing lecturer status more in line with the U.S. model of professor levels. While I think all of this talk about titles is a tedious waste of time, you should know that I was asked to use the term ‘professor’ just prior to posting on the High Def Forum, since that would be understandable to a U.S. audience.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:14 PM   #11  
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[QUOTE=BobY;383954]It *can* give you an accurate picture of a particular slice of reality, just don't extrapolate and imagine it applies to a broad range of people.


Yes, I totally agree with your comments BobY. While it gives an accurate snapshot of one slice of reality, a qualitative small sample cannot be extrapolated to a broad range of people. However, many would argue that this slice of reality can tell us much more than a flattened, formula style large scale sample. Having said that, I am mindful of the pitfalls of this kind of surveying, so thanks for reminding me. You can also make the argument that large scale scientific studies are also flawed, for a host of reasons - and the worst part of this is that because these studies are considered 'scientific', many consider them 100 accurate!

Last edited by JeffHighDef; 10-07-2007 at 10:22 PM..
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Old 10-08-2007, 11:27 AM   #12  
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I also just want to respond to BillinPrinceto. (warning: the following is very boring, most people won't want to waste their time reading it!)
Translation (from Australian English to American English):
You American's are actually rather dumb, and I'm so intelligent that you probably will not be able to grasp the depth of my words and wisdom as expressed herein.

Quote:
While we don't use the term "sophomoric" in Australia, I presume it is derogatory.
You're kidding, right??? The Australian Pocket Oxford Dictionary is Australia's bestselling dictionary; try looking up the word "sophomoric" in it when you have time. Or, try the OED if you must, but the word is in common usage, even "down under".

For example: The High Court of Australia in the case of Al-Kateb v Godwin, wrote in their decision that in a certain other case, the debate "was impoverished and sophomoric." Odd they would use a word that is not used in Australia.

You may presume what you wish; the word is derived from two Greek words loosely tanslated "wise fool".

Quote:
You also seem stressed by the use of the term ‘professor’ without a PhD. Again, you are incorrect here, since in Australia it’s commonplace to have professors in the creative arts/industries without PhDs.
That could very well be. In fact, I had a Professor during my undergraduate studies who did not have a PHD; however, he had impecable credentials, was the author of several notable books, was highly regarded in his field of expertise, and was only granted a Professorship after many years of academic scrutiney by his peers.
See below:

Quote:
In my particular case, I am officially a Lecturer in Film and TV, although that will not mean much to a U.S. audience, since you use terms such as professor, associate professor and assistant professor.
You are woefully misinformed!!!!! Sophomoric, I would even say.
Your somewhat pretentious suggestion that "lecturer" "will not mean much to a U.S. audience" is totally absurd!
Most U.S. universities have lecturers, as do most Australian Universities and most U.K. Universities, etc. We understand the term very well; as well as the approximate professional ranking which it suggests.

Quote:
While I think all of this talk about titles is a tedious waste of time, you should know that I was asked to use the term ‘professor’ just prior to posting on the High Def Forum, since that would be understandable to a U.S. audience.
"asked" . . . by whom???

So, you were asked to LIE about your credentials and you just went along because it sounded like a good idea??

Sounds like you are doing what any red blooded American politician would do in your circumstances . . . 1) blame it on someone else; 2) plead ignorance; 3) make further attempts to obfuscate and mislead; 4) assume that the target audience is dumber than you; 5) attempt to convince the target audience that they aren't very smart.

Let's face it; whether in Australia or the U.S., a "lecturer" is a lower rung position while a "Professor" is a very high rung position. In the U.S., and throughout most of the world this is true to the extent that an assistant or associate professor will never introduce themselves or claim in written material that they are a "Professor" without including the additional defining term . . . to do so would be unethical, misleading and show incredible disrespect for their higher ranking peers.

So, the bottom line is that you lied . . . BIGTIME!!!
You deserve no respect, and owe this forum a true and humble apology for which you should take full responsibility for YOUR improper and deceitful action.
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Old 10-08-2007, 11:31 AM   #13  
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I gotta wonder what your advisors at Melbourne U. will think when they discover that you have introduced yourself to the U.S. as a "Professor in Film & TV"???
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Old 10-08-2007, 01:56 PM   #14  
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Originally Posted by JeffHighDef View Post
Yes, I totally agree with your comments BobY. While it gives an accurate snapshot of one slice of reality, a qualitative small sample cannot be extrapolated to a broad range of people. However, many would argue that this slice of reality can tell us much more than a flattened, formula style large scale sample. Having said that, I am mindful of the pitfalls of this kind of surveying, so thanks for reminding me. You can also make the argument that large scale scientific studies are also flawed, for a host of reasons - and the worst part of this is that because these studies are considered 'scientific', many consider them 100 accurate!
Certainly. It's really a question of what one is trying to find out in a survey (or often what hidden agenda one is trying to promote ). A large sample size could skew your results in the wrong direction by including too many people who are not the target group.

I personally give no credence whatsoever to sample-based surveys that attempt to discern peoples' attitude toward subjective matters and personal values. People are not widgets on a production line and you just can't apply the normal statistical tools in evaluating their responses to such things--people lie, people change their minds, people get distracted and when faced with a question where no appropriate answer choice is provided, they punt.
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Old 10-08-2007, 02:40 PM   #15  
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People do change their minds and they get influnced by education. I can't tell you how many customers and even forum/blog readers will pick up on something and next thing you know they see it as well, where they never noticed it before.

A recient example is I have OTA and U-verse for HD providers. The OTA is far better than the U-verse, but the U-verse HD is so much better than the SD version of the same program the flaws are easily overlooked. My son comes over every Sunday to watch the NFL football game. The first couple of times after I had the U-verse installed he was running late, so I used the DVR function to pause the game until he arrived. That is nice because we could fast forward through the commercials. Once we got caught up to real time, I switched to the OTA tuner. Suddenly he saw the difference and now rather watch on OTA.

Some other people never saw the rainbow effect of a DLP set until they read about it and tried to see it. Once they saw it they saw it from then on.

So I guess the bottom line is what was answered today may not be useful tomorrow.
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