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Netflix goes Bluray only

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Old 02-11-2008, 07:40 AM   #1  
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Default Netflix goes Bluray only

http://www.reuters.com/article/rbssC...EN388420080211

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NEW YORK, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Online video rental company Netflix Inc (NFLX.O: Quote, Profile, Research) said on Monday it would exclusively stock Blu-ray high-definition DVDs after a decision by some the world's biggest movie studios in favor of the Sony Corp (6758.T: Quote, Profile, Research) developed format.

Netflix has stocked DVDs using both Blu-ray and the competing HD DVD format developed by Toshiba Corp (6502.T: Quote, Profile, Research) since they first came on the market in early 2006.

Four out of six major Hollywood studios have recently decided to publish high-definition DVDs only using Blu-ray.

Netflix said that with such a clear signal from the industry, it will only buy Blu-ray discs going forward and will phase out stock of HD DVD by about the end of the year. (Reporting by Michele Gershberg, editing by Dave Zimmerman)
Another blow aleast we have a year before they stop
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:45 AM   #2  
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That stinks for people who actually use Netflix. Can't say that effects me though since I buy HD titles and rent only Blu ones. BD will never get a penny out of me unless there is a BOGO or the prices fall below $20 on day and date titles.

At the end of the day though, I can't help but feel that Toshiba severely fucked up their chances in this war by thinking that the DVD recognition would be more than enough to convert the public over to HD DVD. They've done near nothing except drop player prices.

They seriously dropped the ball in many different ways.

Last edited by Liquidx; 02-11-2008 at 07:50 AM..
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:51 AM   #3  
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That stinks for people who actually use Netflix. Can't say that effects me though since I buy HD titles and rent only Blu ones.

BD will never get a penny out of me unless there is a BOGO or the prices fall below $20 on day and date titles.
I use it and this news sucks cause I heard that they want to charge more for HDM so my monthly subscription will probably go up in price.

Here is the offical press release

http://netflix.mediaroom.com/index.php?s=43&item=265
Quote:
Netflix, Citing a Clear Signal From the Industry, Will Carry High-Def DVDs Only in Blu-ray Format

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif., Feb. 11 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- With the industry now having picked a winner in the face-off between the two competing high- definition DVD formats, Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX), the world's largest online movie rental service, today said that it will move toward stocking high-def DVDs exclusively in the Blu-ray format.

Citing the decision by four of the six major movie studios to publish high-def DVD titles only in the Sony-developed Blu-ray format, Netflix said that as of now it will purchase only Blu-ray discs and will phase out by roughly year's end the alternative high-def format, HD DVD, developed by Toshiba.

Since the first high-definition DVDs came on the market in early 2006, Netflix has stocked both formats. But the company said that in recent months the industry has stated its clear preference for Blu-ray and that it now makes sense for the company to initiate the transition to a single format.

"The prolonged period of competition between two formats has prevented clear communication to the consumer regarding the richness of the high-def experience versus standard definition," said Ted Sarandos, chief content officer for Netflix. "We're now at the point where the industry can pursue the migration to a single format, bring clarity to the consumer and accelerate the adoption of high-def. Going forward, we expect that all of the studios will publish in the Blu-ray format and that the price points of high-def DVD players will come down significantly. These factors could well lead to another decade of disc-based movie watching as the consumer's preferred means."

Added Mr. Sarandos: "From the Netflix perspective, focusing on one format will enable us to create the best experience for subscribers who want high- definition to be an important part of how they enjoy our service."

While only a portion of Netflix subscribers have elected to receive high- def DVDs, a majority of those subscribers have chosen Blu-ray over HD DVD. As part of the transition to Blu-ray, the company said it will acquire no new HD DVDs but that its current HD DVD inventory would continue to rent until the discs' natural life cycle takes them out of circulation in the coming months.

When Warner Home Video announced last month that by the end of this year it will release high-def titles exclusively in the Blu-ray format, it joined fellow majors Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment and Buena Vista Home Entertainment in endorsing Blu-ray. Currently, the two remaining majors, Paramount Home Entertainment and Universal Studios Home Entertainment, publish in the HD DVD format.

Netflix currently stocks over 400 Blu-ray titles, having recently added popular releases such as "Across the Universe" (Sony), "Gone Baby Gone" (Buena Vista) and the Academy Award nominated "Michael Clayton" (Warner Bros.). Blu- ray titles scheduled for release in the next month or so include the Academy Award nominated "No Country for Old Men" (Walt Disney), "Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story" (Sony) and "Alvin and the Chipmunks" (20th Century Fox).

About Netflix

Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX) is the world's largest online movie rental service, providing more than seven million subscribers access to more than 90,000 DVD titles plus a growing library of more than 7,000 choices that can be watched instantly on their PCs. The company offers nine subscription plans, starting at only $4.99 per month. There are no due dates and no late fees -- ever. All Netflix plans include both DVDs delivered to subscribers' homes and, for no additional fee, movies and TV series that can be started in as little as 30 seconds on subscribers' PCs. DVDs are delivered free to members by first class mail, with a postage-paid return envelope, from over 100 U.S. shipping points. Nearly 95 percent of Netflix subscribers live in areas that can be reached with generally one business day delivery. Netflix offers personalized movie recommendations and has two billion movie ratings. For more information, visit http://www.netflix.com/.

SOURCE: Netflix, Inc.

CONTACT: Steve Swasey of Netflix, Inc., +1-408-540-3947,
[email protected]

Web site: http://www.netflix.com/
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:53 AM   #4  
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ouch.....I rarely buy because I wind up watching movies once and then they sit there. Netflix was my HD-DVD source. I'll need to see another source before I fully believe it though.
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:56 AM   #5  
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ouch.....I rarely buy because I wind up watching movies once and then they sit there. Netflix was my HD-DVD source. I'll need to see another source before I fully believe it though.
Reuters is good enough, believe that.

EDIT: The OP posted a quote directly from Netflix also.
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Old 02-11-2008, 07:58 AM   #6  
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ouch.....I rarely buy because I wind up watching movies once and then they sit there. Netflix was my HD-DVD source. I'll need to see another source before I fully believe it though.
My other post has a link that goes right to Netfilx website and has a press release for them. This is really bad there not going to get anymore HDDVD just keep there current stock
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:01 AM   #7  
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Not good news for people that rent movies. They will eventually retract that stupid decision in due time.

Last edited by Super XP; 02-11-2008 at 08:18 AM..
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:02 AM   #8  
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My other post has a link that goes right to Netfilx website and has a press release for them. This is really bad there not going to get anymore HDDVD just keep there current stock
yeah, you posted that as I was posting mine. It wasn't there when I made the initial comment.
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:05 AM   #9  
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Not good news for people that rent movies. They eventually retract that stupid decision in due time.
I hope so I really dont go to the movies anymore, I cant justify paying 9.50 per Adult and up to 7.50 for kids. I usually rent movies and if I like them buy them. Not being able to rent HDDVD when two studios are still with them really piss me off especially when Bee movie and American Gangster are coming out in a couple of movies. I just hope my subscription does go up to high
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:07 AM   #10  
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Not good news for people that rent movies. They eventually retract that stupid decision in due time.
Super, it's great that you have this outlook on HD DVD and all, but to be fair, we all said the same about Blockbuster when they moved to BD exclusiveness. Months later, they haven't faltered. I don't see Netflix changing this stance ever now that they've joined the other main player in online rentals in BD support.

There comes a time when you have to seriously read the writing on the wall. Warner was the earthquake, everything following is the aftershocks.

I'm an HD DVD supporter first, but I'm also very rational.
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:13 AM   #11  
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I'm an HD DVD supporter first, but I'm also very rational.
Very true this hurts me cause I like to rent before I buy. Plus I only tend to buy combo disc in case I go somewhere and want to watch it. This is probably going to make me rent bluray but buy DVD in the future
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:13 AM   #12  
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Originally Posted by Liquidx View Post
Super, it's great that you have this outlook on HD DVD and all, but to be fair, we all said the same about Blockbuster when they moved to BD exclusiveness. Months later, they haven't faltered. I don't see Netflix changing this stance ever now that they've joined the other main player in online rentals in BD support.

There comes a time when you have to seriously read the writing on the wall. Warner was the earthquake, everything following is the aftershocks.

I'm an HD DVD supporter first, but I'm also very rational.

I agree with Liquid. I'd like HDDVD to survive, but being purple myself, I don't see it. Most of my HD movies are rentals. Before I heard this announcement I was thinking of buying Bourne Ultimatum and Inside Man on HD with BOGO at Best Buy. I was leaning towards not buying only because I know I would only watch them once and then they would sit for years, so I would be better off renting. I guess I better try to get them while I can.
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:14 AM   #13  
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Yet another blow. I wish I had never bought into this format. I got my A2 back in late August on the heels of the Paramount/DreamWorks announcement. Seemed like a good idea at the time. And please don't say..."well at least you have an excellent upconverter"...'cause I'm really pissed!!
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:14 AM   #14  
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Originally Posted by Liquidx View Post
Super, it's great that you have this outlook on HD DVD and all, but to be fair, we all said the same about Blockbuster when they moved to BD exclusiveness. Months later, they haven't faltered. I don't see Netflix changing this stance ever now that they've joined the other main player in online rentals in BD support.

There comes a time when you have to seriously read the writing on the wall. Warner was the earthquake, everything following is the aftershocks.

I'm an HD DVD supporter first, but I'm also very rational.
According to Super XP there are a long list of decisions that have been made in the last few months that will all be changed in the future. It is funny, that with each new decision, and I consider the Netflix decision one of the biggest outside of Warner's decision, Super XP knows the decision was a mistake. I think the bottom line is simple, carrying both formats can't be a money maker. I haven't seen an announcement from Blockbuster to discontinue HD DVD rentals online, have I missed that? I do expect Blockbuster to announce that soon if they haven't already.

Chris
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Old 02-11-2008, 08:18 AM   #15  
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I consider the Netflix decision one of the biggest outside of Warner's decisionChris
agreed. I was happy with HDDVD while I could get from Netflix, but I won't buy the movies, so other than upconverting capabilities, my player is useless. Hell, I've had Shrek 3 for 3 months now and I haven't opened it......that's how much I watch bought movies. Netflix was my source as it is for my Blu movies.
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