High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource

Go Back   High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource >
Rules HDTV Forum Gallery LINK TO US! RSS - High Def Forum AddThis Feed Button AddThis Social Bookmark Button Groups

High Definition Media A place to discuss BD and UHD Content from physical and digital media

Wal-Mart set to join UltraViolet digital movie group

Reply
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-06-2012, 06:25 PM   #1  
High Definition is the definition of life.
Thread Starter
 
mikemorel's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 884
Default Wal-Mart set to join UltraViolet digital movie group

Wal-Mart set to join UltraViolet digital movie group

Quote:
Retail giant Wal-Mart will announce its support for Hollywood's UltraViolet digital movie technology at a media event to be held in Los Angeles next Tuesday, according to several people familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak publicly.

As the nation's biggest seller of DVDs — responsible for up to 40% of all DVD sales in the U.S. — Wal-Mart's support could provide a critical boost to UltraViolet, which had a troubled launch last fall. The technology, which is backed by five of Hollywood's six major studios and dozens of electronics manufacturers, lets consumers store copies of movies they buy in the online cloud, which they can then access on any compatible digital device.

Wal-Mart will sell Ultraviolet-enabled copies of movies through Vudu, the online video service that it acquired in 2010. In addition, consumers will be able to bring copies of DVDs they own into stores. For a small but not yet determined fee, Wal-Mart employees will give those customers a copy of the movie in their UltraViolet account.

That option, which Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group President Kevin Tsujihara called "disc-to-digital" at an investor event last week, will be critical to boosting use of UltraViolet. Thus far, the only compatible movies have been certain ones that have been launched on DVD since October.

Technological glitches and a cumbersome registration process generated negative consumer reactions when Ultraviolet debuted. Tsujihara said last week, "The launch wasn't perfect, I'll be the first one to admit it," adding that it was important to get the years-in-the-works technology rolled out sooner, rather than waiting to perfect it.

Tsujihara and other Hollywood executives have said it is critical for Ultraviolet to succeed in order to turn around ongoing declines in home entertainment revenue. While online movie rentals are increasingly popular, online movie sales are not. Studios make a much larger profit from sales than rentals.

Once Wal-Mart begins supporting UltraViolet aggressively, it's likely that other retailers such as Best Buy will follow. Amazon.com, the largest online DVD retailer, in January announced a deal giving it the rights to sell Ultraviolet digital copies, but it has yet to start offering the service.

All of Hollywood's top movie studios save for Walt Disney Studios are behind UltraViolet, but the dominant seller of digital movies, Apple's iTunes, is not involved. The iPhone and iPad maker is developing its own service to store movies in the virtual cloud, people familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak publicly have said.

News of Wal-Mart's plans to convert DVDs into Ultraviolet copies was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.
mikemorel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 06:45 PM   #2  
High Definition is the definition of life.
Thread Starter
 
mikemorel's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 884
Default

Can Wal-Mart Save UltraViolet?

Quote:
Hollywood’s Ultraviolet cloud initiative has registered only 1 million users to date and has been dogged by complaints that its technology is too cumbersome for consumers. Next week, the five major studios behind Ultraviolet will hold a press conference with Wal-Mart (NYSE: WMT) to detail their new partnership. Is this the lifeline the struggling movie-cloud venture has been looking for?

On Tuesday in Los Angeles Wal-Mart is expected to announce details about how it will serve UltraViolet and provide with the retail partnership it can’t live without. Backed by five of Hollywood’s six major studios—Disney (NYSE: DIS) remains the only holdout—UltraViolet was launched in October with hopes that would entice consumers away from low-margin rental streaming of movies and TV shows, as well as illegal torrenting, through a system of cloud-based distribution of digital entertainment. The essential pitch: buy a DVD, Blu-ray or electronic sell-through title from a participating major studio, and play it on up to 12 devices and share it with your family.

At the Consumer Electronics Show in January, Amazon (NSDQ: AMZN) announced UltraViolet retail support for Warner Bros. (NYSE: TWX) releases. But to date, the initiative has lacked a crucial retail touchpoint serving all the participating studios—a much-needed brick-and-mortar destination that can walk consumers through the tedium of cloud sign-up and solve a range of other problems. The Wall Street Journal reported last week that Wal-Mart was in talks to establish such a location within the photo-printing area of most, if not all, of its U.S. stores. The Journal also said that Wal-Mart will kick in much-needed retail promotional support in the form of a $30 million marketing campaign. Wal-Mart is also expected to provide details on how authentication of current disc libraries will be handled through UltraViolet.

At CES, Samsung showed off several new Blu-ray players with a “Disc to Digital” feature that would upload consumers’ existing DVD and Blu-ray titles to the UltraViolet cloud for a nominal fee. However, it’s believed that Wal-Mart will announce a service whereby legacy disc titles will have to be authenticated through its stores in order to be uploaded to the cloud. A Samsung representative did not respond to inquiries as to how the Disc to Digital would work with such a retail scheme.

Also expected to be announced: the inclusion of Wal-Mart’s Vudu online movie download and rental service into the UltraViolet portfolio. To date, UltraViolet has lacked a partner with the technological infrastructure to sell and serve movies to a wide range of devices. Vudu, the nation’s No. 3 online movie service, has app that plays on most devices and could solve many of those issues.
mikemorel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 07:12 PM   #3  
Home Theater Enthusiast
 
Kosty's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,063
Default

Merging the infrastructure of Vudu and the prominence, reach and marketing of Walmart with UltraViolet is a very good thing.

Makes perfect sense to me.
Kosty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 09:26 PM   #4  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,749
Default

Vudu is the big deal here.

Nice to finally have UltraViolet on a quality EST / Streaming offering.
PSound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 10:39 PM   #5  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 
GizmoDVD's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,114
Default

So will Vudu stream UV copies from Blu-rays? That would be great.
GizmoDVD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 11:39 PM   #6  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,749
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GizmoDVD View Post
So will Vudu stream UV copies from Blu-rays? That would be great.
That should be the end goal.

To have a good streaming service behind however you obtain an UltraViolet license, vs getting stuck with the studio backed stream that may not be available on devices (or have a crappy stream).
PSound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 12:09 AM   #7  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 2,730
Default

Quote:
In addition, consumers will be able to bring copies of DVDs they own into stores. For a small but not yet determined fee, Wal-Mart employees will give those customers a copy of the movie in their UltraViolet account.
I wish they did this for blu rays.
And no, '$5 off MSRP when you trade in the DVD' doesnt count. But I guess a UV copy is a tougher sell.
DonnyDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 12:55 AM   #8  
Home Theater Enthusiast
 
Kosty's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,063
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GizmoDVD View Post
So will Vudu stream UV copies from Blu-rays? That would be great.
I hope so. That would be great.
Kosty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 12:56 AM   #9  
Home Theater Enthusiast
 
Kosty's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,063
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSound View Post
That should be the end goal.

To have a good streaming service behind however you obtain an UltraViolet license, vs getting stuck with the studio backed stream that may not be available on devices (or have a crappy stream).
I fully agree with you here.

A common platform also would ensure your cloud based stuff would be around in the future as well.
Kosty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 04:35 AM   #10  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 
Chris Gerhard's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 10,947
Default

I have still never streamed or played UltraViolet but I do use Vudu and don't have an understanding of why any of this should matter to me. I like Vudu just fine but will never stream a movie I own on Blu-ray or DVD, instead will just play the disc as I always have. It seems like a waste of bandwidth to stream movies I own on disc from the internet. If you sell the disc can you still stream the movie?
Chris Gerhard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 09:52 AM   #11  
Super Moderator
 
bruceames's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Novato, CA
Posts: 17,128
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Gerhard View Post
I have still never streamed or played UltraViolet but I do use Vudu and don't have an understanding of why any of this should matter to me. I like Vudu just fine but will never stream a movie I own on Blu-ray or DVD, instead will just play the disc as I always have. It seems like a waste of bandwidth to stream movies I own on disc from the internet. If you sell the disc can you still stream the movie?
I agree, and in my case the quality would be worse than DVD because I don't have a lot of bandwidth to begin with (Comcast). Of course it would never compare with Blu-ray.

I think the studios are overestimating the desire for consumers to watch full length movies on their portable devices. I can see it for airport layovers, or being stuck somewhere where there's no TV and a lot of time on your hands, but how often is that going to happen? Business travelers can watch a movie on the airplane, or in a hotel room, I don't know. But for home viewing, it's better to just watch the digital copy or the disc itself.

Good question on if UV rights are transferable. I don't know the answer to that. If not, and you sell just the disc, you should not lose the right to the UV copy since you paid for it.
bruceames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 09:57 AM   #12  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 1,749
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceames View Post
I agree, and in my case the quality would be worse than DVD because I don't have a lot of bandwidth to begin with (Comcast). Of course it would never compare with Blu-ray.

I think the studios are overestimating the desire for consumers to watch full length movies on their portable devices. I can see it for airport layovers, or being stuck somewhere where there's no TV and a lot of time on your hands, but how often is that going to happen? Business travelers can watch a movie on the airplane, or in a hotel room, I don't know. But for home viewing, it's better to just watch the digital copy or the disc itself.

Good question on if UV rights are transferable. I don't know the answer to that. If not, and you sell just the disc, you should not lose the right to the UV copy since you paid for it.
We have talked about this before, but it is all about adding value to ownership.

For me, there is value in having my library with me wherever I am. That includes being able to hook up my iPad to a TV at a rental condo, hotel or even at a friends house.

I am far more likely to purchase a title (vs rent) if I know I will forever have access to it wherever I am.
PSound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 10:13 AM   #13  
Super Moderator
 
bruceames's Avatar
 

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Novato, CA
Posts: 17,128
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PSound View Post
We have talked about this before, but it is all about adding value to ownership.

For me, there is value in having my library with me wherever I am. That includes being able to hook up my iPad to a TV at a rental condo, hotel or even at a friends house.

I am far more likely to purchase a title (vs rent) if I know I will forever have access to it wherever I am.
I can see it adding value on the level of another special feature, but as special features go, not many people watch them. Watching movies on the go is not something people do a lot of, and those that do would probably prefer the digital copy anyway.

UV's future seems to be limited to adding value and extending the life of OD, rather than generating any appreciable revenue on its own. Reminds me of another format.
bruceames is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 11:41 AM   #14  
Home Theater Enthusiast
 
Kosty's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,063
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceames View Post
I can see it adding value on the level of another special feature, but as special features go, not many people watch them. Watching movies on the go is not something people do a lot of, and those that do would probably prefer the digital copy anyway.

UV's future seems to be limited to adding value and extending the life of OD, rather than generating any appreciable revenue on its own. Reminds me of another format.
At CES 2012 both the CEA and NPD had a lot of data that a lot of tablet usage, mostly television, was used not on the road but actually done in the home. Younger users especially were using the small screens to watch mostly short form content like TV show episodes around the house, in the bedroom and while multi tasking activities in the home.

How you can text, tweet, watch a TV show episode, do a You Tube video and play a game all at the same time on a smart phone or tablet is kinda beyond my personal capability but its being done.

Longer form content like theatrical movies still tends to be watched on the larger displays in the house but even then more and more people are mutitasking with second screens even then when they are watching the movie. That's why Disney and others are doing second screen applications so you can look up stuff on your iPad or smartphone on the web while watching the content on your larger screen on the Blu-ray Disc.

But for some family members that trend younger if you are used to using your tablet or smartphone all the time anyway having access to your families DVD collection when you want it on demand no matter what corner of the house you are at could also be appealing I guess. Not my preference, but I'm older than that to understand the urges of the younger generation. For me its a waste watching theatrical movies on a portable device unless I'm traveling. Even then I find more and more I can get an HDMI input on my hotel TV if I want to watch something off the web off my laptop.

Last edited by Kosty; 03-07-2012 at 11:46 AM..
Kosty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 12:07 PM   #15  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 
Chris Gerhard's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 10,947
Default

I watch movies on the go, car DVD player or portable player but never, ever, not even one time have I watched a movie I own on Blu-ray using a portable player. I will just wait and watch that movie in HD on an HDTV. So much discussion about getting digital copies or UV copies or DVD copies of movies consumers buy on Blu-ray and it isn't even a feature that matters at all to me. I couldn't even place it in the top 1 million items I would want, it probably falls outside the top 1 billion but so much effort continues to be made to meet consumer's demand of that product.

Maybe the next time I see someone watching a movie on a 7" or 10" tablet or iPhone I will ask them if they own that movie on Blu-ray and if the answer is yes, I will ask them why in the world are you watching the movie on that piece of shit?

My children or grandchildren also don't need to watch digital copies of movies I own on Blu-ray, they can watch other programs not owned on Blu-ray, on portable players and watch anything owned on Blu-ray using a Blu-ray player and an HDTV. It is still the stupidest concept I see discussed at various forums, all of the fuss about digital copies, what an absurd worthless added value.
Chris Gerhard is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Go Back   High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource >
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:49 AM.



Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004 - 2018, MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands