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Optical (Blu-ray/DVD) and Digital (EST/UV) Sales Thread

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Old 03-13-2012, 11:38 AM   #1951  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PSound View Post
That is not quite correct.

As far as models, Netflix generates more revenue than Blu-ray. Granted, it is an odd comparison as Netflix includes revenue from OD.

Although this year we will very likely see Netflix domestic streaming alone outpace Blu-ray sell through revenue, and possibly outpace all Blu-ray spending.


I know your goal is to spin Blu-ray in the best light possible (spin, spin, spin), but you cannot ignore other Home Video revenue streams that are outpacing Blu-ray in growth and revenue if you are going to make a statement like above. Or at least you cannot truthfully make such statements.
I agree that revenues from Netflix subscription streaming side are growing rapidly as well but much of that is a transfer away from the disc revenues besides being a net loss to the studios as cheap subscription streaming and cheap kiosk rentals cannibalize more profitable packaged media sell through. Its not like Netflix subscription streaming is a high margin revenue stream to the studios (or retailers) from the consumer side.

But I see your point and i agree with you that its significant. But much of Netflix revenues there are a transition from DVD rentals to SVOD. pretty much a wash from the consumer side from the studio perspective.

What is more significant to the studios is the growing extra revenues for Netflix content acquisition for older content and for things like old TV shows that did not generate much in the ways of revenues before. That Netflix is willing to pay more for content that the studios did not make much money from before helps a lot and is huge in its significance.

The studios are happy to take Netflix's money for that older content like TV shows especially if it does not take away as much from the high value high margin stuff like EST , perhaps UltraViolet and DVD and Blu-ray sales as much.

We agree here more than we disagree. But you cannot deny that Blu-ray is larger already in magnitude has grown larger and at a faster pace than EST and UV. Those were the other new successors to DVD that I was referring to in that regard.

Personally I like Netflix a lot for TV shows and I think the studios now are loving the growth of that Netflix rights for content revenue stream as well. It all adds up together to the studios bottom line no matter where it comes from and together all those new revenue streams will add up to compensate for the DVD revenue decline.
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:44 AM   #1952  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kosty View Post
I agree that revenues from Netflix subscription streaming side are growing rapidly as well but much of that is a transfer away from the disc revenues besides being a net loss to the studios as cheap subscription streaming and cheap kiosk rentals cannibalize more profitable packaged media sell through. Its not like Netflix subscription streaming is a high margin revenue stream to the studios (or retailers) from the consumer side.
Netflix streaming is very high margin for the studios. That is why gross margin on streaming is low right now. That revenue is going straight to content owners. I would argue at this point that content owners could see more per dollar from Netflix streaming revenue than even from the average OD sell through transaction.


Far higher margin than the subscription disc model, where the post office gets much of the revenue and studios see very little due to Netflix having a large amortized library that fulfills customer requests without the studios getting a dime.
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:45 AM   #1953  
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Funny ha ha.

Linking to a google search calling me a liar.

What in the heck is the matter with you?

google search of "definition of lying"
It should be definition of "state false information".
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:46 AM   #1954  
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It will never happen.

Hell, I have proof that he posted false information about me (see my sig) and he did not retract it.

Indeed, he chose to use it as an opportunity to attack me more despite clear, undeniable proof that he posted false information about what I stated and asserted (see my sig for details).

I will let others judge the character of someone who chooses to post falsehoods, is proven that he made false statements about what another member posted and then chooses to respond to proof about posting falsehoods about someone else by attacking and insulting that person again.

Short story: Don't expect honesty now to suddenly become the norm.

I am actually quite shocked such a sig is allowed.

It is nothing more than a thinly veiled personal attack.

Just one more step in your ongoing smear campaign against an individual. Disgraceful really. Talk about character...
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:48 AM   #1955  
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Originally Posted by Kosty View Post
We agree here more than we disagree.
Not on the true fundamentals.

I would never assert that someone stated something they didn't.

And if I did by accident, I would not take that as an opportunity to post more attacks against them.


That is a fundamental difference on how we approach this hobby. I will not lie about what others have stated. I will not defend someone posting false quotes (or do so myself). If it happens, it will be an error that I will correct.
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Old 03-13-2012, 11:52 AM   #1956  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PSound View Post
Not on the true fundamentals.

I would never assert that someone stated something they didn't.

And if I did by accident, I would not take that as an opportunity to post more attacks against them.

That is a fundamental difference on how we approach this hobby. I will not lie about what others have stated. I will not defend someone posting false quotes (or do so myself). If it happens, it will be an error that I will correct.
I am thinking about my own new sig.

A liar is full of oaths.
Pierre Corneille

What do you think?
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Old 03-13-2012, 04:28 PM   #1957  
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Originally Posted by PSound View Post
Netflix streaming is very high margin for the studios. That is why gross margin on streaming is low right now. That revenue is going straight to content owners. I would argue at this point that content owners could see more per dollar from Netflix streaming revenue than even from the average OD sell through transaction.
It isnt enough. If you recall the starz deal.
Quote:
According to a person familiar with the matter, Starz was asking for an increase of 10 times the licensing fee that Netflix originally paid in 2008, a jump that Netflix executives felt was "exorbitant." In the original deal, Netflix had agreed to pay Starz roughly $30 million a year in order to license its content.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...871923760.html
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Old 03-13-2012, 05:16 PM   #1958  
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Talking about the growing importance of the international revenues for the studios.

Plus mentions of packaged media rentals growing in North America and how low EST levels are overall compared to theatrical and Blu-ray and DVD.



Quote:
Emerging Markets Driving Movie Consumption


13 Mar, 2012
By: Erik Gruenwedel

Rampant piracy and lower adoption continue to hinder home entertainment growth globally

Walt Disney Studios’ maligned sci-fi adventure movie John Carter may have generated just 12% ($30 million) of its $250 million mega-budget on opening weekend in the United States, but the film recorded an impressive 28% ($70 million) at foreign box offices – including the highest opening ever for a movie in Russia.

The tally represents a growing trend in Hollywood that revenue growth across all distribution channels, excluding home entertainment, is being driven by emerging markets instead of North America and Western Europe. Indeed, total movie consumption is projected to increase 2.6% this year to $64.2 billion from $62.6 billion in 2011, according to new data from IHS Screen Digest.

Movie spending in Central and Eastern Europe will rise at a compound annual growth rate of 8.9% from 2010 to 2015, while Asia-Pacific will expand by 6.5% and Latin America by 4.2%. By comparison, movie spending in North America and Western Europe will grow 0.2% and 1.1%, respectively, during the same period.

The theatrical sector — which accounted for $31 billion, or 50% of movie spending in 2011 — will generate $41 billion annually by 2015, equivalent to 59% of total spending. Almost $6 billion of that increase will have come from the developing regions of Asia-Pacific, Central and Eastern Europe and Latin America, with a further $4 billion generated in North America and Western Europe. Despite the declines in some other sectors, this growth will help swell transactional movie spending to almost $70 billion in 2015.

“The expansion in global movie spending is being driven almost entirely by consumers in the growing economies of Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe,” said Richard Cooper, senior analyst for video at IHS. “This is occurring despite the fact that the three regions combined accounted for only about one-third of total global movie spending in 2011. The remaining two-thirds of the spending was generated by consumers in the mature markets of North America and Western Europe—where growth has stalled.”

Meanwhile, home entertainment spending continues to decline globally as stagnant growth in North America and Western Europe is undermined by lower adoption and rampant piracy in developing markets. Sales of DVD and Blu-ray Disc movies accounted for less than 30% of all movie spending in these regions in 2011, down from almost 40% at the market’s peak in 2004, according to IHS.

Notably, movie rental consumption in North America increased in 2011 — the first rise in eight years – due largely to the popularity of low cost kiosk vendors Redbox and Blockbuster Express.

Electronic sellthrough and transactional video-on-demand rentals accounted for just 2% of 2011 movie consumption in North America, less so in Western Europe. Rampant piracy and limited content selections continue to hinder EST and transactional VOD in emerging markets, including Japan despite widespread adoption of Apple products and Xbox.

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/ind...sumption-26663
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Old 03-13-2012, 05:19 PM   #1959  
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Another order of magnitude check:

Quote:
Notably, movie rental consumption in North America increased in 2011 — the first rise in eight years – due largely to the popularity of low cost kiosk vendors Redbox and Blockbuster Express.
Quote:
Electronic sellthrough and transactional video-on-demand rentals accounted for just 2% of 2011 movie consumption in North America, less so in Western Europe. ...
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Old 03-13-2012, 07:00 PM   #1960  
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Week Ending 03/03/12


About the same revenues as last week.

Its the first time the YoY for Blu-ray is down this year but this was one of the two best 1Q 2010 weeks to go against. This was Bambi new to Blu-ray week last year.

The only remaining 1Q 2010 week over $31 M is week 13/13 next month. The next three weeks before that are easier comparison weeks coming up.



Last edited by Kosty; 03-13-2012 at 07:08 PM..
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Old 03-13-2012, 07:31 PM   #1961  
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Updated thru week ending 3/3/12
Table of Blu-ray sales (HMM and DEG)
numbers are in (revenue) millions.
Weekly figures are from HMM (Home Media Magazine

Code:
2012 HMM    1395.28    -1.3%    1068.02    -7.1%     327.16   23.5%    23.4%    1380.0  1266.5										
Week Date      OD     OD YoY      DVD    DVD YoY       BD    BD YoY  BD Share  TBO2012 TBO2011										

9   3/3      150.39   -14.0%     115.29   -13.4%      35.10  -15.7%    23.3%      67.0   112.3
8   2/25     158.98    -2.2%     122.04    -7.3%      36.94   19.4%    23.2%     272.1   258.0
7   2/18     207.15    18.9%     160.38    10.4%      46.77   61.7%    22.6%      16.4    86.2
6   2/11     205.54    19.4%     151.09     3.1%      54.45  104.2%    26.5%     316.5   224.0
5   2/4      144.90    -8.6%     110.25   -16.0%      34.65   27.1%    23.9%     118.5    23.0
4   1/28     131.95   -13.6%      98.40   -20.2%      33.55   14.2%    25.4%     226.3   201.2
3   1/21     129.39    -2.4%     103.53    -4.9%      25.86    8.9%    20.0%     112.7    60.7
2   1/14     128.65    -5.1%     100.16    -7.7%      28.49    5.6%    22.1%     143.4   116.2
1   1/7      138.33    -8.0%     106.88   -11.6%      31.35    7.0%    22.7%     157.7   134.3

2011 DEG    8951.80   -13.2%    6851.80   -19.5%    2150.00   19.4%    24.0%    
2011 HMM    8604.20   -13.9%    6608.28   -20.3%    1995.92   17.7%    23.2%    9936.0 10820.9																			

Q4 DEG      3338.95   -11.0%    2464.81   -16.5%     924.14   15.5%    27.7%
Q4 HMM      3125.11   -12.4%    2280.75   -19.5%     844.36   15.1%    27.0%    3698.4  3932.2

52  12/31    174.13   -25.6%     130.29   -28.7%      43.84  -14.7%    25.2%      64.3    95.9
51  12/24    482.11   -13.1%     368.59   -16.9%     113.52    2.2%    23.5%     205.6   303.6
50  12/17    369.89   -23.4%     280.58   -26.8%      89.31  -10.1%    24.1%     360.7   635.3
49  12/10    322.48   -14.5%     243.85   -18.6%      78.63    1.5%    24.4%     624.8   535.6
48  12/3     229.49   -23.3%     173.97   -27.5%      55.52   -6.2%    24.2%     282.0   496.0
47  11/26    388.67   -12.4%     300.39   -16.5%      88.28    5.0%    22.7%     194.5   185.3
46  11/19    166.84   -14.3%     127.57   -18.0%      39.27    0.5%    23.5%      41.6   359.0
45  11/12    183.17     2.5%     128.95   -12.0%      54.22   68.3%    29.6%     422.9   251.3
44  11/5     167.53   -16.8%     117.59   -22.8%      49.94    2.0%    29.8%     335.6   414.9
43  10/29    147.15    11.2%      96.66   -11.3%      50.49  115.6%    33.6%     204.5   108.7
42  10/22    156.94     9.5%      95.94   -17.1%      61.00  120.8%    38.9%     370.0    56.0
41  10/15    152.92    -2.4%     106.50   -14.1%      46.42   42.2%    30.4%     343.3   233.0
40  10/8     183.79     9.3%     109.87    -9.4%      73.92   57.7%    40.2%     248.6   257.6

Q3 DEG      1742.79    -4.0%    1320.93   -14.7%     421.86   58.0%    24.2%
Q3 HMM      1667.09    -4.9%    1298.39   -13.9%     368.70   49.9%    22.1%    1806.3  1609.5										

39  10/1     152.58   -14.3%     109.97   -20.4%      42.61    7.1%    27.9%     352.1   382.7
38  9/24     153.60     5.0%     108.69   -12.5%      44.91  103.6%    29.2%     169.3   112.5
37  9/17     164.69    14.0%     107.37   -14.2%      57.32  197.2%    34.8%     190.8   165.2
36  9/10     128.84     0.0%     102.29   -10.5%      26.55   82.9%    20.6%     189.3    60.3
35  9/3      119.04    -9.5%     100.87   -13.7%      18.17   23.5%    15.3%      65.6    95.1
34  8/27     109.34   -13.1%      91.74   -16.6%      17.60   11.5%    16.1%      12.6    45.3
33  8/20     124.53    -4.4%     101.11   -12.8%      23.42   63.3%    18.8%     100.8    81.2
32  8/13     122.13    -1.8%      98.44    -9.5%      23.69   51.8%    19.4%     118.0   143.9
31  8/6      139.66     1.4%     111.78    -3.6%      27.88   27.9%    20.0%     189.8   133.5
30  7/30     108.78   -18.3%      89.06   -20.2%      19.72   -8.7%    18.1%      56.8   177.2
29  7/23     120.50    -1.9%      97.25    -9.4%      23.25   49.9%    19.3%      88.3    72.7
28  7/16     118.09    -4.8%      94.88   -13.5%      23.21   61.7%    19.7%     267.8    94.7
27  7/9      105.31   -16.7%      84.94   -22.7%      20.37   22.9%    19.3%       5.1    45.2										
		
Q2 DEG      1831      -15.0%    1434      -18.8%     397       9.4%    21.7%
Q2 HMM      1791.55   -12.2%    1402.94   -16.7%     388.61    9.1%    21.7%    2314.8  2422.0

26  7/2      127.11   -12.3%      96.32   -21.6%      30.79   39.4%    24.2%     102.3   181.4
25  6/25     123.25    -7.7%      98.18   -12.8%      25.07   20.1%    20.3%     205.4    85.8
24  6/18     149.89   -11.2%     114.68   -17.7%      35.21   19.5%    23.5%     208.2   142.8
23  6/11     130.81   -13.6%     103.23   -18.6%      27.58   12.3%    21.1%     305.0   152.6
22  6/4      118.16   -34.1%      96.17   -32.8%      21.99  -39.1%    18.6%      15.8   386.8
21  5/28     113.83   -16.6%      91.37   -22.9%      22.46   24.9%    19.7%     154.4    87.9
20  5/21     111.98   -15.2%      91.84   -18.9%      20.14    7.2%    18.0%      99.8   185.7
19  5/14     111.02   -23.6%      90.00   -26.8%      21.02   -6.2%    18.9%     155.6   113.6
18  5/7      122.05   -25.2%      99.74   -29.5%      22.31   -7.7%    18.3%     141.5   106.1
17  4/30     106.99   -40.6%      86.94   -39.6%      20.05  -44.5%    18.7%       0.0   120.5
16  4/23     217.30    -8.3%     171.47    -0.3%      45.83  -29.4%    21.1%     187.5   841.3
15  4/16     184.50    48.7%     134.40    24.8%      50.10  205.3%    27.2%     314.8     8.1
14  4/9      174.66    21.6%     128.60     5.9%      46.06  107.5%    26.5%     424.5     9.4
										
Q1 DEG      2068      -20.0%    1661      -25.0%     407      10.0%    19.7%		
Q1 HMM      2020.45   -23.2%    1626.20   -28.4%     394.25    9.4%    19.5%    2116.5  2857.2

13  4/2      192.11   -36.0%     144.16   -44.6%      47.95   20.1%    25.0%     300.9   461.1
12  3/26     135.54   -49.8%     110.21   -50.9%      25.33  -44.1%    18.7%     218.0   335.6
11  3/19     138.72   -46.5%     112.58   -49.6%      26.14  -27.1%    18.8%     154.2   534.3
10  3/12     146.96   -24.4%     116.11   -30.8%      30.85   16.5%    21.0%     177.0   247.2
9   3/5      174.59    -7.2%     132.93   -15.4%      41.66   34.1%    23.9%     112.3   258.8
8   2/26     160.96     4.5%     130.35    -2.5%      30.61   50.7%    19.0%     258.0    74.9
7   2/19     172.68    -8.1%     143.99   -12.7%      28.69   25.0%    16.6%      86.2    80.1
6   2/12     172.00   -19.4%     145.34   -23.1%      26.66    8.9%    15.5%     224.0   211.0
5   2/5      158.26   -16.7%     131.08   -20.8%      27.18   11.1%    17.2%      23.0   114.6
4   1/29     151.21   -14.6%     122.05   -20.9%      29.16   27.6%    19.3%     201.2   151.6
3   1/22     131.62   -16.3%     107.98   -21.0%      23.64   14.8%    18.0%      60.7    61.0
2   1/15     135.49   -17.3%     108.51   -23.9%      26.98   27.0%    19.9%     143.3   137.8
1   1/8      150.31   -14.1%     120.91   -19.5%      29.40   18.6%    19.6%     157.7   189.2

OD = optical disc (DVD + Blu-ray)
YoY = year over year percentage change
TBO = total box office
BD = Blu-ray
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Old 03-13-2012, 07:36 PM   #1962  
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That's actually a bit better than I expected after the Bambi, Megamind week 2 comparison week.

The rest of March is easier in the YoY match ups.

The next three 1Q 2011 comparison weeks are only:

$30.85 M
$26.14 M
$25.33 M
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Old 03-13-2012, 10:22 PM   #1963  
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Updated thru week ending 3/3/12

Table of Blu-ray sales (HMM and DEG)
numbers are in (revenue) millions.

Weekly figures are from HMM (Home Media Magazine

Code:
2012 HMM    1395.28    -1.3%    1068.02    -7.1%     327.16   23.5%    23.4%    1380.0  1266.5										
Week Date      OD     OD YoY      DVD    DVD YoY       BD    BD YoY  BD Share  TBO2012 TBO2011										

9   3/3      150.39   -14.0%     115.29   -13.4%      35.10  -15.7%    23.3%      67.0   112.3
8   2/25     158.98    -2.2%     122.04    -7.3%      36.94   19.4%    23.2%     272.1   258.0
7   2/18     207.15    18.9%     160.38    10.4%      46.77   61.7%    22.6%      16.4    86.2
6   2/11     205.54    19.4%     151.09     3.1%      54.45  104.2%    26.5%     316.5   224.0
5   2/4      144.90    -8.6%     110.25   -16.0%      34.65   27.1%    23.9%     118.5    23.0
4   1/28     131.95   -13.6%      98.40   -20.2%      33.55   14.2%    25.4%     226.3   201.2
3   1/21     129.39    -2.4%     103.53    -4.9%      25.86    8.9%    20.0%     112.7    60.7
2   1/14     128.65    -5.1%     100.16    -7.7%      28.49    5.6%    22.1%     143.4   116.2
1   1/7      138.33    -8.0%     106.88   -11.6%      31.35    7.0%    22.7%     157.7   134.3

2011 DEG    8951.80   -13.2%    6851.80   -19.5%    2150.00   19.4%    24.0%    
2011 HMM    8604.20   -13.9%    6608.28   -20.3%    1995.92   17.7%    23.2%    9936.0 10820.9																			

Q4 DEG      3338.95   -11.0%    2464.81   -16.5%     924.14   15.5%    27.7%
Q4 HMM      3125.11   -12.4%    2280.75   -19.5%     844.36   15.1%    27.0%    3698.4  3932.2

52  12/31    174.13   -25.6%     130.29   -28.7%      43.84  -14.7%    25.2%      64.3    95.9
51  12/24    482.11   -13.1%     368.59   -16.9%     113.52    2.2%    23.5%     205.6   303.6
50  12/17    369.89   -23.4%     280.58   -26.8%      89.31  -10.1%    24.1%     360.7   635.3
49  12/10    322.48   -14.5%     243.85   -18.6%      78.63    1.5%    24.4%     624.8   535.6
48  12/3     229.49   -23.3%     173.97   -27.5%      55.52   -6.2%    24.2%     282.0   496.0
47  11/26    388.67   -12.4%     300.39   -16.5%      88.28    5.0%    22.7%     194.5   185.3
46  11/19    166.84   -14.3%     127.57   -18.0%      39.27    0.5%    23.5%      41.6   359.0
45  11/12    183.17     2.5%     128.95   -12.0%      54.22   68.3%    29.6%     422.9   251.3
44  11/5     167.53   -16.8%     117.59   -22.8%      49.94    2.0%    29.8%     335.6   414.9
43  10/29    147.15    11.2%      96.66   -11.3%      50.49  115.6%    33.6%     204.5   108.7
42  10/22    156.94     9.5%      95.94   -17.1%      61.00  120.8%    38.9%     370.0    56.0
41  10/15    152.92    -2.4%     106.50   -14.1%      46.42   42.2%    30.4%     343.3   233.0
40  10/8     183.79     9.3%     109.87    -9.4%      73.92   57.7%    40.2%     248.6   257.6

Q3 DEG      1742.79    -4.0%    1320.93   -14.7%     421.86   58.0%    24.2%
Q3 HMM      1667.09    -4.9%    1298.39   -13.9%     368.70   49.9%    22.1%    1806.3  1609.5										

39  10/1     152.58   -14.3%     109.97   -20.4%      42.61    7.1%    27.9%     352.1   382.7
38  9/24     153.60     5.0%     108.69   -12.5%      44.91  103.6%    29.2%     169.3   112.5
37  9/17     164.69    14.0%     107.37   -14.2%      57.32  197.2%    34.8%     190.8   165.2
36  9/10     128.84     0.0%     102.29   -10.5%      26.55   82.9%    20.6%     189.3    60.3
35  9/3      119.04    -9.5%     100.87   -13.7%      18.17   23.5%    15.3%      65.6    95.1
34  8/27     109.34   -13.1%      91.74   -16.6%      17.60   11.5%    16.1%      12.6    45.3
33  8/20     124.53    -4.4%     101.11   -12.8%      23.42   63.3%    18.8%     100.8    81.2
32  8/13     122.13    -1.8%      98.44    -9.5%      23.69   51.8%    19.4%     118.0   143.9
31  8/6      139.66     1.4%     111.78    -3.6%      27.88   27.9%    20.0%     189.8   133.5
30  7/30     108.78   -18.3%      89.06   -20.2%      19.72   -8.7%    18.1%      56.8   177.2
29  7/23     120.50    -1.9%      97.25    -9.4%      23.25   49.9%    19.3%      88.3    72.7
28  7/16     118.09    -4.8%      94.88   -13.5%      23.21   61.7%    19.7%     267.8    94.7
27  7/9      105.31   -16.7%      84.94   -22.7%      20.37   22.9%    19.3%       5.1    45.2										
		
Q2 DEG      1831      -15.0%    1434      -18.8%     397       9.4%    21.7%
Q2 HMM      1791.55   -12.2%    1402.94   -16.7%     388.61    9.1%    21.7%    2314.8  2422.0

26  7/2      127.11   -12.3%      96.32   -21.6%      30.79   39.4%    24.2%     102.3   181.4
25  6/25     123.25    -7.7%      98.18   -12.8%      25.07   20.1%    20.3%     205.4    85.8
24  6/18     149.89   -11.2%     114.68   -17.7%      35.21   19.5%    23.5%     208.2   142.8
23  6/11     130.81   -13.6%     103.23   -18.6%      27.58   12.3%    21.1%     305.0   152.6
22  6/4      118.16   -34.1%      96.17   -32.8%      21.99  -39.1%    18.6%      15.8   386.8
21  5/28     113.83   -16.6%      91.37   -22.9%      22.46   24.9%    19.7%     154.4    87.9
20  5/21     111.98   -15.2%      91.84   -18.9%      20.14    7.2%    18.0%      99.8   185.7
19  5/14     111.02   -23.6%      90.00   -26.8%      21.02   -6.2%    18.9%     155.6   113.6
18  5/7      122.05   -25.2%      99.74   -29.5%      22.31   -7.7%    18.3%     141.5   106.1
17  4/30     106.99   -40.6%      86.94   -39.6%      20.05  -44.5%    18.7%       0.0   120.5
16  4/23     217.30    -8.3%     171.47    -0.3%      45.83  -29.4%    21.1%     187.5   841.3
15  4/16     184.50    48.7%     134.40    24.8%      50.10  205.3%    27.2%     314.8     8.1
14  4/9      174.66    21.6%     128.60     5.9%      46.06  107.5%    26.5%     424.5     9.4
										
Q1 DEG      2068      -20.0%    1661      -25.0%     407      10.0%    19.7%		
Q1 HMM      2020.45   -23.2%    1626.20   -28.4%     394.25    9.4%    19.5%    2116.5  2857.2

13  4/2      192.11   -36.0%     144.16   -44.6%      47.95   20.1%    25.0%     300.9   461.1
12  3/26     135.54   -49.8%     110.21   -50.9%      25.33  -44.1%    18.7%     218.0   335.6
11  3/19     138.72   -46.5%     112.58   -49.6%      26.14  -27.1%    18.8%     154.2   534.3
10  3/12     146.96   -24.4%     116.11   -30.8%      30.85   16.5%    21.0%     177.0   247.2
9   3/5      174.59    -7.2%     132.93   -15.4%      41.66   34.1%    23.9%     112.3   258.8
8   2/26     160.96     4.5%     130.35    -2.5%      30.61   50.7%    19.0%     258.0    74.9
7   2/19     172.68    -8.1%     143.99   -12.7%      28.69   25.0%    16.6%      86.2    80.1
6   2/12     172.00   -19.4%     145.34   -23.1%      26.66    8.9%    15.5%     224.0   211.0
5   2/5      158.26   -16.7%     131.08   -20.8%      27.18   11.1%    17.2%      23.0   114.6
4   1/29     151.21   -14.6%     122.05   -20.9%      29.16   27.6%    19.3%     201.2   151.6
3   1/22     131.62   -16.3%     107.98   -21.0%      23.64   14.8%    18.0%      60.7    61.0
2   1/15     135.49   -17.3%     108.51   -23.9%      26.98   27.0%    19.9%     143.3   137.8
1   1/8      150.31   -14.1%     120.91   -19.5%      29.40   18.6%    19.6%     157.7   189.2

OD = optical disc (DVD + Blu-ray)
YoY = year over year percentage change
TBO = total box office
BD = Blu-ray


hat tip bruceames
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Old 03-14-2012, 07:00 AM   #1964  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kosty View Post
That's actually a bit better than I expected after the Bambi, Megamind week 2 comparison week.
Except Puss in Boots (week 2) this year had the same TBO as Megamind, did it not? And Puss in Boots was released the Friday prior to the 3/4 week comparison?

Which would leave Bambi from last year competing with Hugo this year, which won 5 (and was nominated for a total of 11) academy awards for sound and cinematography that same week, and was watched by 39 million people in the U.S.

Quote:
The rest of March is easier in the YoY match ups.

The next three 1Q 2011 comparison weeks are only:

$30.85 M
$26.14 M
$25.33 M
And then there is the next four weeks:

47.95 M
46.06 M
50.10 M
45.83 M

Last edited by mikemorel; 03-14-2012 at 07:03 AM..
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Old 03-14-2012, 07:36 AM   #1965  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemorel View Post
Except Puss in Boots (week 2) this year had the same TBO as Megamind, did it not? And Puss in Boots was released the Friday prior to the 3/4 week comparison?

Which would leave Bambi from last year competing with Hugo this year, which won 5 (and was nominated for a total of 11) academy awards for sound and cinematography that same week, and was watched by 39 million people in the U.S.
That's right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kosty
That's actually a bit better than I expected after the Bambi, Megamind week 2 comparison week.
Megamind was also a Friday release same as Puss in Boots.

I did not think that this week would stack up that well to the Bambi's Blu-ray+DVD combos release last year with Puss and Boots being apples to apples with Megamind with the $72 M Hugo going against Disney's Bambi. Maybe you expected more but I really did not.

But last year had Bambi as a new to Blu-ray release as a BD+DVD combo with the DVD only version being delayed so it was a major event for packaged media sales that week.

Hugo even as an Oscar winning film as a new release had a modest box office performance so its not like a classic animation Disney title coming out after a long time for DVD new to Blu-ray and home video where the DVD version was delayed.

Puss and Boots and Megamind were more apples to apples.

Quote:
And then there is the next four weeks:

47.95 M
46.06 M
50.10 M
45.83 M
Right, that's the stretch from the last week in 1Q 2010 and first three weeks of 2Q 2010 that includes Easter, Tangled Tron Legacy and Harry Potter 7.1 last year. That's really the last significant 2010 Blu-ray weeks until mid September.

The next three weeks coming up are easier, the following four weeks are tougher, but then after that the next twenty two weeks over the rest of 2Q and most of the 3Q are pretty modest in Blu-ray's 2010 performance so whatever we see by the end of April for Blu-ray YoY performance will not fall much over the summer until we get to the September summer tent pole releases again.

By the time we get to those this year we have the Easter releases and Mission Impossible and other titles to compete with them. But that's really the last 2010 stretch that's really competitive in the comparisons until September.










Last edited by Kosty; 03-14-2012 at 07:42 AM..
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