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The Studios have a Hidden agenda for HDDVD

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Old 03-06-2006, 05:05 PM   #1
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Default The Studios have a Hidden agenda for HDDVD

I noticed that the Toshiba DVD player has an ethernet connection. I could not tell on the Sony. I would be willing to bet that the ethernet connection was put there to support a subscription based or a pay per view service by the studios in the not to distant future. If you asked Toshiba, I would bet that thet would tell you that the connection was put there to correct firmware problems. It would be interesting if some of you technical people could read the firmware contents, there could be some web addresses from the studios. I think they plan to sell the higher level content on a pay per view or subscription basis utilizing the interface to enable it on the player. (something similar to the music industry) I think the story about the copy protection rational that they have based the standards on was a cover to get this implemented and by approved the FCC.
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Old 03-06-2006, 05:08 PM   #2
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The ethernet connection is required in order to make a copy of the DVD. I presume it is also the method how Toshiba will update the internal software of the player (for the upcoming changes in AACS, etc). Personally, I don't like an ethernet connection requirement for managed copy, but do I like the idea of being able to get software downloads to correct defects in the software.
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Old 03-06-2006, 05:25 PM   #3
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Default Local Copy

I had heard that you could make a copy but it would only work on that player. A copy could be made and set to only play on that machine locally without the need for a connection. I also know a lot a people that don't have an internet connection and in a lot of cases it may be years before it's available to them. It seems unfair to only allow people with internet to make a copy.
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Old 03-06-2006, 05:38 PM   #4
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Um..most likely ALL nextgeneration HD movie players will have an ethernet jack. Please leave your stupid conspiracy theories at the door. The title of this thread is very stupid too.
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Old 03-06-2006, 06:18 PM   #5
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I think that my opinion is just as valuablle as yours. I also get, from reviewing some of your other posts that your inputs are just opinions as well. A forum is where people should share thoughts and ideas. I think you should maybe brush up on your manners. (just my opinion)
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Old 03-06-2006, 07:08 PM   #6
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Ignore uCOM-4 when he gets in his moods (was doing alright for awhile)... On a tree full of apples, you're bound to get some bad ones. Just note to yourself, uCOM-4, aka Raspberry, aka HD Guru, has been banned twice.

Edit... Welcome to the forums.
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Old 03-06-2006, 07:21 PM   #7
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That's ok. Thanks for the welcome. I guess I'm a little cranky myself. Just realized a few days ago when checking out the two new DVD formats that I don't have DHMI or DVI.

Thanks
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Old 03-06-2006, 11:34 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vfowler
I think that my opinion is just as valuablle as yours. I also get, from reviewing some of your other posts that your inputs are just opinions as well. A forum is where people should share thoughts and ideas. I think you should maybe brush up on your manners. (just my opinion)
Care to explain how an ethernet jack automatically equals "Studios have a hidden agenda for HD DVD"..???

Does my cable box with a telephone jack mean the cable company has a hidden agenda too? Ignorance is bliss.
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Old 03-06-2006, 11:41 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vfowler
That's ok. Thanks for the welcome. I guess I'm a little cranky myself. Just realized a few days ago when checking out the two new DVD formats that I don't have DHMI or DVI.

Thanks
On Blu Ray...you will not need a digital connection, and will get HD via component on both Sony and Mgm movies.
Disney and Paramount have said they will have no ICT at first either.

Not sure on the others as I have seen no info on them yet.
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Old 03-07-2006, 07:59 AM   #10
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Updating firmware via internet I can believe. It's also possible that you may have to log-in or verify a license, etc., it's basically an open door to possibilities, why not include it with the build?

Anyway, we know that the physical distribution model is being challenged by larger bandwidth broadcast and internet downloads. Fewer and fewer folks will be willing to go out of their way to pick up a disk, if they can simply press a button and get the same thing for more of less the same cost. It's only a matter of time. It's not a conspiracy to commit some kind of deceptive act, it's just new technology and something called progress.

Lastly, if you don't like it, then don't buy it.

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Old 03-07-2006, 08:04 AM   #11
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Interesting link.

http://www.videobusiness.com/index.a...leid=CA6310882
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Old 03-07-2006, 08:14 AM   #12
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Players from both camps will universally incorporate ethernet jacks into their players. If the studios do have a hidden agenda, (which I kind of doubt in this case) you can bet that they'll use both HD-DVD and BR to push it off on consumers- not just one brand or the other.
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Old 03-07-2006, 12:21 PM   #13
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I am hoping that alot of people don't like it and don't buy it

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peferling
Lastly, if you don't like it, then don't buy it.

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Old 03-07-2006, 05:02 PM   #14
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Here is the text from the article.

Here is the link: http://www.videobusiness.com/index....cleid=CA6310882


laying with business

FEB. 24 | From the beginning, both the Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD development processes have been aimed in part at creating formats that will support a variety of new business models for distributing content on shiny discs. Now, with the release of the interim license agreement for the Advanced Access Content System, along with format-specific implementation specs describing how the copy-protection rules will work in each, we’re getting the first formal look at some of the new business models the developers may have in mind.

For instance, both formats support time-based playback limitations.

Both Blu-ray and HD DVD players will include secure internal “clocks” that will continue running on battery power even when the devices are turned off or unplugged, like the clock in a PC.

AACS-encrypted discs can be encoded with a kind of digital time stamp that will tell a licensed playback device not to play the disc until a certain date and time, as determined by the internal clock.

That would make it possible for a studio to begin staging distribution of the discs well before street date without fear that they would “leak” out ahead of schedule.

Discs marked “not valid before” a particular date could even be safely put into the pipeline before a movie bows theatrically, guaranteeing the discs would be widely available for a day-and-date release, or after a very short theatrical window.

Of course, discs could also be stamped “not valid after,” which would allow the studio to limit a movie’s availability to a particular window. In effect, the high-def DVD window could be more like the theatrical or pay-per-view window, in which the movie is available in that format for a discreet period of time, after which it could be shifted to another format or window.

In principle, the studios could use the high-def formats’ clock mechanism to create new, time-limited release windows along the lines of what News Corp. president Peter Chernin discussed at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.

Keynoting a technology dinner, Chernin said News Corp.-owned Fox was working on plans to carve out a new premium, single-view high-def window between the theatrical and DVD release. While pressing and distributing discs might not be the most economically feasible platform for such a release, the new formats will be technically capable of supporting business models based on time-limited availability.

Another feature of AACS is the ability to “enable” access to content on the disc through an online transaction.

In one possible scenario (discussed explicitly in the HD DVD implementation spec), discs could be distributed without the title-specific decryption key needed to read the data on the disc.

When the user puts the disc in the player, the player would generate a purchase menu. Selecting “buy” from the menu would initiate contact with a remote server using the player’s network connection.

After a credit-card transaction, the server would send the player an encrypted temporary key, which the player would use to decrypt the content on the disc for playback. The temporary key would be valid for as long as the content file remained active in the device’s “playback” mode. Once playback stops, the key would no longer be valid.

The clear implication of such a scenario is that content on an HD DVD disc could be offered on a pay-per-view basis, in which each viewing required a separate transaction.

Both formats also allow content on the disc and content that is downloaded and stored locally to be treated as a single package, or “bundle,” on playback. Downloaded content can be stored either as a new file or can overwrite content already stored in local memory. And the bundle can be defined so that locally stored content can supersede content on the disc.

Thus, a studio could offer “virtual” new editions of a movie—such as a director’s cut—without having to distribute new discs.

Of course, that would also mean without retailers.
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Old 03-07-2006, 07:02 PM   #15
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When you hear about all of these business models, I keep thinking - this sounds good for the movie execs, but not for the consumer. Most players won't have internet access anyway, since the computer with the network connection is not located next to the player. Only those with wireless connections could practically take advantage of this (and even then, you would need some intermediate device to read the wireless signal and put it on the ethernet cable for the player to read). Currently, wireless connectivity in the home is quite low.
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