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Choosing a 37 inch display

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Old 06-05-2005, 12:18 AM   #1  
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Default Choosing a 37 inch display

I'm looking to purchase a 37" flat panel HDTV and bump up our Comcast cable service to digital and whatever HD channels are available.

Due to the size of the room, I need to go with 37 instead of the popular 42 inch models.

So far, I've read all the introductory level material there is to read about flat panel displays
and feel pretty confident that I understand the fundamentals.

I'm interested in the following products (all 37 inch models):

Sony KDE-37XS955 (Plasma)
Samsung HPP3761 (Plasma)
Panasonic TH-37PWD7UY (Plasma)
Panasonic TH-37PX5OU (plasma)
Sharp Aquos LC-37D7U (LCD)

I don't mind spending some money on a flat panel as long as the quality justifies the cost.

I've got a few questions:
- The biggest problem I have right now is that I can't get a good feel for how well these tv's will
work with non-HD content. I was able to see DVD and DirectTV non-HD content at Circuit City on
the 42 inch Panasonic and Sony models but I haven't been able to get a good demo of the models
mentioned above. Does anyone have any recommendations for where to do this in North Jersey? Any places with knowledgeable
HDTV/flat panel sales people?

- I can't find the Panasonic TH-37PWD7UY at a major retailer. Does anyone know where I can see this in action?

- What should my expectation be for non-HD content? I thought the PQ on the Panansonic 42PX50U was
so obviously worse than a CRT and the Sony plasma that I cannot imagine purchasing that model. Could
it be that this TV was not set up properly in the store and therefore the picture looked worse than it would otherwise?
Due to the enthusiasm over Panasonic that I see on this board, I was surprised to see such a poor PQ.

- The comcast "digital" channels 0-99 in this area are really analog. I think they're supposed
to convert soon. Should I expect a better picture on these channels if they make the switch
from analog to digital?

- I've been thinking about LCD vs plasma and have ready many comparisons. I was all set to go with
LCD when I suspected that fast motion on LCD may not look so good. I'm concerned that this will
be a problem when watching sports. Is it too much of a subjective question to ask if this is the
case, in the context of the models mentioned above?

Thanks in advance for any opinions, advice and info. And thanks to everyone on this board who are already posting so much useful info.


Mike
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Old 06-05-2005, 12:47 AM   #2  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miketv
- I've been thinking about LCD vs plasma and have ready many comparisons. I was all set to go with
LCD when I suspected that fast motion on LCD may not look so good. I'm concerned that this will
be a problem when watching sports. Is it too much of a subjective question to ask if this is the
case, in the context of the models mentioned above?
As long as the response time is 16ms or less, there should be no problem at all with motion blur. The LC-37D7U has a 16ms response time, so should be fine. Try to make comparisons of the above mentioned TVs in-store to decide which produces the best picture for you.

You can still get an excellent PQ on non-hd content with good cables on LCD, at least as good as Plasma. Analog can look bad on LCD vs Plasma, but this isn't the case so much with digital non-hd content.

Just my opinion with LCD.
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Old 06-05-2005, 02:03 AM   #3  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miketv
Does anyone have any recommendations for where to do this in North Jersey? Any places with knowledgeable
HDTV/flat panel sales people?

- I can't find the Panasonic TH-37PWD7UY at a major retailer. Does anyone know where I can see this in action?

Mike
If you can't find anywhere in North Jersey, I believe I've seen the 37" Panny at a place here in Lancaster, PA. They also had several other models to compare. The store wasn't a large retailer, but rather a high-end A/V store. Obviously the price would be somewhat higher there, but if you just want to see it in action and talk to some knowledgable people, then you might want to pay them a visit. If you like it then you can order it somewhere else. They are called "Wee-Bee Audio & Video". Here's their website, but it's not that great:
Wee-Bee
I can either call them or stop by to make sure this is the exact model you are looking for, but I know they had the 37" Panny fired up at the time. Let me know if you want to pursue this. I know it's sort of far for you, but there would be other things to do here besides see the Amish or milk cows if you wanted to make a day of it.
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Old 06-05-2005, 03:29 AM   #4  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miketv
I'm looking to purchase a 37" flat panel HDTV and bump up our Comcast cable service to digital and whatever HD channels are available.

Due to the size of the room, I need to go with 37 instead of the popular 42 inch models.

So far, I've read all the introductory level material there is to read about flat panel displays
and feel pretty confident that I understand the fundamentals.

I'm interested in the following products (all 37 inch models):

Sony KDE-37XS955 (Plasma)
Samsung HPP3761 (Plasma)
Panasonic TH-37PWD7UY (Plasma)
Panasonic TH-37PX5OU (plasma)
Sharp Aquos LC-37D7U (LCD)

I don't mind spending some money on a flat panel as long as the quality justifies the cost.

I've got a few questions:
- The biggest problem I have right now is that I can't get a good feel for how well these tv's will
work with non-HD content. I was able to see DVD and DirectTV non-HD content at Circuit City on
the 42 inch Panasonic and Sony models but I haven't been able to get a good demo of the models
mentioned above. Does anyone have any recommendations for where to do this in North Jersey? Any places with knowledgeable
HDTV/flat panel sales people?

- I can't find the Panasonic TH-37PWD7UY at a major retailer. Does anyone know where I can see this in action?

- What should my expectation be for non-HD content? I thought the PQ on the Panansonic 42PX50U was
so obviously worse than a CRT and the Sony plasma that I cannot imagine purchasing that model. Could
it be that this TV was not set up properly in the store and therefore the picture looked worse than it would otherwise?
Due to the enthusiasm over Panasonic that I see on this board, I was surprised to see such a poor PQ.

- The comcast "digital" channels 0-99 in this area are really analog. I think they're supposed
to convert soon. Should I expect a better picture on these channels if they make the switch
from analog to digital?

- I've been thinking about LCD vs plasma and have ready many comparisons. I was all set to go with
LCD when I suspected that fast motion on LCD may not look so good. I'm concerned that this will
be a problem when watching sports. Is it too much of a subjective question to ask if this is the
case, in the context of the models mentioned above?

Thanks in advance for any opinions, advice and info. And thanks to everyone on this board who are already posting so much useful info.


Mike

I have 2 Plasmas, the latest being a 37PWD7UY, and its simply an amazing piece of engineering...it blows away my new SONY 20" HD-LCD which I bought for my desk, and it blows away my 47" RP-CRT HDTV. Unfortunately, they are not available in stores, so seeing one is not possible unless you have access to news studio (like I have). I always practice what I preach, and I always preach the "eyeball test" is the only measurement you need. In this case therefore, it seems hypocritical for me to recommend that you run, not walk to get the 7UY Panny...but perhaps go to a store and see the 37" consumer models and then imagine and even better picture than that...it's as close as you will come to seeing the real deal. I bought mine at Plasma Depot (http://www.plasmadepot.com/panasonic...h37pwd7uy.html) for $1579. It takes a few days to arrive, but well worth the wait. Forget the LCD as I said before, I just bought one, albeit a 20" SONY for desktop use, and its a joke compared to a Plasma...darks and blacks are greys, contrast ratio sucks, terrible for sports (motion blur), and viewing angle is a joke and that is important if you have guests over. Good luck....and I hope you make a wise choice......PS...women LOVE Plasmas....!!!...trust me on that one.

Last edited by myers830; 06-05-2005 at 03:32 AM..
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Old 06-05-2005, 05:00 AM   #5  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myers830
Forget the LCD as I said before, I just bought one, albeit a 20" SONY for desktop use, and its a joke compared to a Plasma...darks and blacks are greys, contrast ratio sucks, terrible for sports (motion blur), and viewing angle is a joke and that is important if you have guests over.
That's a 20" Sony LCD monitor, NOT a Sharp Aquos 37" LCD TV...
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Old 06-05-2005, 08:13 AM   #6  
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Originally Posted by HDTV_NZ
That's a 20" Sony LCD monitor, NOT a Sharp Aquos 37" LCD TV...
$4500 for a 37" anything is totally foolish. The Sharp Aquos 37" (the BEST LCD in existance) was in fact reveiwed next to a $1600 37" ED Panny and lost in every category except life expectancy and even that part of it is a moot point since 60,000 hours for a Plasma is many, many years of use. When I find the link to that article..I will be very glad to post it here. The poster's question was which 37" is the best bang for the buck....it's NO contest. LCD has a long way to go to come up to PLasma standards....blacks, grey levels, contrast ratios, viewing angle, motion blur, color saturation, and the list goes on and on...are better on Plasma, and getting better all the time. If not for the "burn-in" issue, LCDs would be totally irrelevant as far as fixed-pixel displays go....and having 2 Plasmas myself, one 4 years old....the burn-in issue is fast becoming a non-issue.
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Old 06-05-2005, 08:23 AM   #7  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myers830
$4500 for a 37" anything is totally foolish. The Sharp Aquos 37" (the BEST LCD in existance) was in fact reveiwed next to a $1600 37" ED Panny and lost in every category except life expectancy and even that part of it is a moot point since 60,000 hours for a Plasma is many, many years of use. When I find the link to that article..I will be very glad to post it here. The poster's question was which 37" is the best bang for the buck....it's NO contest. LCD has a long way to go to come up to PLasma standards....blacks, grey levels, contrast ratios, viewing angle, motion blur, color saturation, and the list goes on and on...are better on Plasma, and getting better all the time. If not for the "burn-in" issue, LCDs would be totally irrelevant as far as fixed-pixel displays go....and having 2 Plasmas myself, one 4 years old....the burn-in issue is fast becoming a non-issue.
Here is the article:
Panasonic Plasma vs. Sharp LCD TV Review
Models:
Panasonic TH-37PWD6UY / TH-37PD25UP - See Note
Sharp LC-37G4U LCD
Description
37" Plasma TV, Widescreen 16:9 Format
37" LCD TV, Widescreen 16:9 Format
Resolution Plasma Television: 854 x 480 (WVGA)
LCD Television: 1366 x 768 (WXGA)
Reviewer: William Becker

Date: 8-1-2004
The Panasonic TH-37PWD6UY is Panasonic's sixth-generation professional plasma display unit. It replaces the 37PWD5UZ, and is, without question, Panasonic's best 37-inch plasma monitor yet. Not only has Panasonic upped the stated contrast ratio on this unit to 4000:1, it has also doubled the TH-37PWD6UY's gray scale from 1,024 (the industry standard) to 1,536. The TH-37PWD6UY plasma display also features a newly developed plasma panel structure, which utilizes wall-like ribs around each pixel element to boost total light emission.
The Sharp LC-37G4U 37-inch LCD TV is designed by Toshiyuki Kita, an internationally renowned product designer, and manufactured in Sharp's brand-new, state-of-the-art LCD glass factory in Kameyama, Japan, which came online in January 2004. This LCD display features Sharp's new Quick Shoot video circuit, which is said to achieve sub 16ms response times—among the fastest in the industry—and minimize motion lag in fast-moving scenes. The LC-37G4U also utilizes Sharp's proprietary Advanced View/Black TFT Panel with anti-glare coating for increased brightness levels and viewing angles.
This head-to-head test is being conducted using two of the best-performing displays from their respective categories.
Note
The Panasonic TH-37PWD6UY is the professional version of the TH-37PD25UP consumer model plasma television. As such, the TH-37PWD6UY does not come with a tuner or built-in speakers. The TH-37PD25UP does. Aside from some basic aesthetic differences, though, these plasma TV models are identical: They both have 37-inch screens, 856 x 480 resolutions, and identical pictures. The Panasonic TH-37PWD6UY (professional model) will be used in Picture evaluations. The TH-37PD25UP (consumer model) will be used for Other Considerations and Value judgments, as the Sharp LC-37G4U includes a tuner and speakers, too.



The Panasonic Plasma displays excellent, realistic color with high detail.

PICTURE
Panasonic Plasma TV: 96/100
These televisions were tested right out of their boxes, at their respective factory settings. What one usually expects to see right out of the box is eye-popping, cartoon-ish coloration and an extravagantly bright picture. Not so with Panasonic's 37" plasma display. Right out of the box, this Panasonic's coloration was spot-on. Based on picture test material from Video Essentials, we found no reason to adjust the COLOR or TINT settings from the median factory presets (0 on a scale of -15 to 15 for both). And, since realism is the standard for high-end image reproduction, Panasonic's plasma monitor scored very high marks in the picture department, as it produced some of the most realistic looking images we have seen coming from a fixed-pixel display, period.
The Panasonic TH-37PWD6UY plasma TV is an excellent example of plasma's ability to replicate extremely black blacks. One only has to look at the intense blackness of the letterboxing on this Panasonic plasma screen to recognize that much. The black levels on this Panasonic plasma display are stellar, as is its dark material detailing. One of the keys with dark material detailing is achieving a truly variegated gray scale, one that allows for minute distinctions among shades of gray. This Panasonic plasma display achieves just the right mix of truly deep blacks and subtle gradations of black (which are technically gradations of gray, only they don't look that way on the screen). The TH-37PWD6UY plasma monitor employs fully 1,536 levels of gray, and this translates into extra-sharp, extra-detailed shadow detail, which is especially noticeable in a darker film like Veronica Guerin, one of the films we screened for this review.



The Panasonic Plasma excels even in dark scenes.

Head to head, the plasma display fared better in the viewing angle department than did LCD monitor. One can just about watch good plasma display units sideways! The Panasonic TH-37PWD6UY plasma screen TV had astoundingly obtuse viewing angles, which I would estimate at 170°, maybe more.
The scaling and processing demonstrated by the TH-37PWD6UY plasma television was impeccable. Naturally, a plasma unit of this resolution (i.e., 854 x 480) displayed progressive-scan DVD signals marvelously. After all, the resolutions do match up perfectly. The Panasonic plasma monitor performs well with other signals, too. The unit displayed data signals well and is capable of displaying them up to a UXGA resolution (i.e., 1600 x 1200). But we preferred the clarity of text and graphics as displayed at 800 x 600, or SVGA resolution. Moreover, the new Panasonic TH-37PWD6UY upconverts satellite and cable signals to progressive-scan quality, which is a real advancement over regular, interlaced TV signals. This Panasonic plasma display evidenced great engineering when it came to its electronic "insides"-i.e., its processing and scaling circuitry.

The Panasonic plasma TV we tested displayed a picture with no noticeable ghosting or pixelation. Hence Panasonic's considerable reputation for image fidelity. This plasma unit also displayed the race scenes from Seabiscuit true, with no noticeable pixelation around the horses' galloping legs
Sharp LCD TV: 92/100
As for the coloration on the 37G4U LCD monitor, we were generally pleased with it, despite the fact that the display's white balance leans toward pink, lending warmth to flesh tones. Such tendencies bother some people. Fortunately, this Sharp LCD TV's TINT function can be adjusted. With the TINT bumped up to 4 (on a scale from -30 [red] to 30 [green]) and the COLOR set at -2, the Sharp 37G4U was very acceptable in color performance.



The Sharp LCD TV provides saturated color and good black levels for an LCD display.

The black levels on Sharp's 37G4U LCD TV were surprisingly good for an LCD display, particularly one of this size. At 37 inches, this Sharp LCD display is fairly sizeable, certainly large enough to be the principal display in a home theater environment. The problem is, the larger LCDs get, the lighter their overall brightness levels and contrast ratios get. And so it is with the Sharp 37G4U LCD TV: Its brightness levels simply could not match up to those of a well-made plasma unit, though, in general, the Sharp's black levels were above-average for an LCD. In fact, one might not notice any particular deficiency in the blacks unless you were watching the very same material side-by-side on a plasma display (which we were).
Sharp does a couple smart things to enhance the black levels on its 37G4U display. First, they include a first-rate anti-glare/darkness-enhancing coating on the LCD screen to counter excessive light emissions, which tend to dull blacks on the screen. Second, Sharp enables the user to adjust the intensity of the backlight powering his or her unit. Since LCD technology operates by blocking, rather than reflecting or emitting, light, the ability to manipulate the amount of light that has to be blocked in order to generate deep, rich blacks greatly enhances the prospects of obtaining decent-if-not-good black levels from this unit. We found that backing off the BACKLIGHT setting on the Sharp 37G4U LCD TV helped it to generate deeper blacks.
The Sharp 37G4U LCD TV, on the other hand, dimmed considerably when you got about 60° or 65° off its central viewing axis. While it is possible to see the picture on Sharp's LCD monitor from the side, we found that, realistically, the LCD screen had a viewing angle of around 125° to 130°.
Given the Panasonic plasma's performance in the scaling/processing department, we had our concerns about the Sharp when it came to displaying a non-native resolution like 480p at its native resolution of 720p. But all these misgivings were allayed as soon as we popped Veronica Guerin in our Sony DVD player. The opening scene, where the camera floats over Dublin's port as a shipment of heroin comes in from sea, literally shone with detailing. This was also evident in the characters' faces throughout the movie. This suggests that the Sharp 37G4U has excellent scaling technology, because its 720p signal looked as good as Panasonic's 480p signal.
As with the Panasonic plasma display, the Sharp LCD display did not show much in the way of false contouring, pixelation, or ghosting. We were especially pleased with the Sharp LCD TV's handling our Ultimate DVD test disc and its torturous Rodeo Clown sequence. Even with the unpredictable bucks and head thrusts of a raging bull, the Sharp kept its cool, depicting no ghosting or pixelation that we could detect.
The only thing we noticed with respect to the Sharp's handling of action scenes was an ever-so-slight fuzziness that appeared as the scenes changed repeatedly. This will hardly be distracting to the average viewer, though real video sticklers will notice this—and probably complain about it.
We were pleased with the 37G4U's handling of 720p HD signals, which it readily upconverted to its native resolution of 768p. HDTV signals on the Sharp LCD TV looked stunning, deep and full of detail! Even with a 1080i video signal, which had to be de-interlaced and re-scaled, the Sharp did not miss a beat. Likewise with its handling of computer signals via its DVI-I input: The 37G4U displayed XGA (1024 x 768) data signals with extraordinary clarity and sharpness. Both graphics- and data-intensive applications looked good on the screen, though the Sharp LCD's real strength is its ability to display letters and numbers with perfect geometry and precision for long periods of time with no burn-in. The Sharp 37G4U LCD monitor bests the Panasonic plasma display performance-wise with graphics and data signals.

Picture-wise, these are both good performers. The Panasonic TH-37PWD6UY plasma display edged out the Sharp LCD display in three of the four major categories-color fidelity, brightness, and viewing angles-though not by much. To our eyes, Sharp's LCD TV tied Panasonic's plasma TV in the signal processing/scaling department. The Sharp LCD monitor had the edge with data signals. LCD technology has clearly come a long way in a relatively short amount of time, all the way to becoming a genuine rival to plasma technology, at least in the under-40-inch category.
OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
Both the Panasonic plasma TV and the Sharp LCD TV ran quietly—almost silently—throughout our tests. We were hard-pressed to hear it from even a foot away, let alone from the six to eight feet of viewing distance recommended for 37-inch displays like these. Even Sharp's set-top box ran whisper-quiet.
As for the dimensional component of the Plasma vs. LCD showdown, we'll have to call it a toss-up as well. Both the Panasonic TH-37PD25UP plasma TV and the Sharp 37G4U LCD TV have depths of 3.9 inches with their speakers attached. Both had more than adequate audio systems of 16W and 20 W, respectively. Neither display is going to win any home-theater audio awards, but neither one is going to disappoint the casual viewer, provided he or she has realistic expectations for what a built-in, mock-surround-sound audio system can do.
Panasonic Plasma TV: 92/100
The Panasonic TH-37PD25UP features an enhanced jack pack, which features front and back inputs: 2 component video inputs (back); 3 S-video inputs (1 front, 2 back); 3 composite video inputs (1 front, 2 back); HDMI interface (back); VGA input (back); PC audio input (back); 5 RCA-type audio inputs (back). This plasma display also includes a Memory Card slot. In short, Panasonic's plasma display will not fall into obsolescence any time soon.
But its picture will fade over time. The half-life on this well-made plasma TV is 30,000 hours, after which time the screen will be half as bright as it was out of the box. The decline in screen brightness will probably be imperceptible, since it occurs quite slowly over time. Burn-in, on the other hand, will be quite noticeable, if one fails to take some common-sense precautions against it. Although most of the big-name manufacturers have taken great steps to ward off burn-in in their plasma TVs, the possibility of burn-in occurring on a plasma screen persists. Which makes this plasma a less-than-stellar candidate as a working computer monitor. Reasonable care is more than enough to prevent burn-in in the first place, but there is nothing like immunity—especially if one intends to have his or her flat panel TV double as a computer monitor.
So, while the Panasonic plasma is a more-than-adequate television, it is probably a bit less versatile than the Sharp LCD is, which is one reason why the Sharp gets the nod here.
Sharp LCD TV: 94/100
The Sharp 37G4U LCD TV matches up nicely with the Panasonic TH-37PD25UP plasma TV, input-wise. The Sharp has all rear-facing inputs, in similar quantities as the Panasonic: 2 component video inputs, 3 composite video inputs, a DVI input, an HDMI interface, 3 RCA-type audio inputs, and a PC audio input. The only difference between these two units is that the Panasonic plasma display has 3 S-video inputs, whereas the Sharp LCD monitor only has only one. (There is a corresponding disparity in audio inputs, two less on the Sharp LCD TV since it has two fewer S-video inputs.) All things considered, these flat panel displays tie one another in the connectivity department.
Where the Sharp LCD really outpaces the plasma, though, is in the screen integrity/longevity department. The single greatest distinction between plasma and LCD displays—besides picture quality and coloration—has to do with the imperviousness of LCD screens to burn-in and the renewability of their picture elements. The florescent bulb that powers the Sharp's picture should realistically last about as long as the plasma TV's half-life, 30,000 hours. The bulb may not burn out for a few thousand more hours, but its white balance will probably have changed enough and the bulb itself will probably have dimmed dramatically enough to merit replacement. Whereas one would have to replace an entire plasma TV in such instances, one only has to replace the bulb in the Sharp LCD. The Sharp LCD TV can be returned to "like-new" performance levels with a simple bulb change out, which Sharp's Service Center assured us can be done by the user him- or herself. Thus, the Sharp Aquos line has a big advantage over Panasonic's plasma line when it comes to performance over time.
A well-made plasma may have a slight edge, picture-wise, over a similarly well-made LCD display, but users can count on their LCD TVs to continue to perform, given a minimal investment (around $270 for a new lamp), indefinitely.
VALUE
Panasonic Plasma TV: 94/100
Between the Panasonic TH-37PD25UP plasma display and the Sharp 37G4U LCD display, the real value has to be the Panasonic unit. The prices of both these flat-panel TVs reflect the cost of tuners and speakers as included with the units. In this scenario, we had to give the Panasonic plasma the nod: For a street price of around $2600 for the Panasonic plasma TV, one saves about $1400 over the comparably equipped LCD TV (which has a street price around $4000). Simply put, the Panasonic TH-37PD25UP is an excellent value. The disparity in price has very little to do with the quality of the additional features, the tuner and speakers, when you consider the fact that the Panasonic plasma comes with a 16W sound system (versus a 20W sound system on the Sharp LCD, which, to our ears, sounded no better or worse than the 16W system on the Panasonic), and an integrated NTSC/ATSC tuner (versus a set-top box containing only an NTSC tuner with the Sharp). One simply gets more for his or her money, picture-wise, with plasma display technology, mostly because LCD glass screens still cost more to produce—especially in larger sizes—than plasma screens do.
The Panasonic might have scored higher if it had been an HD-ready unit. Even with just an 854 x 480 resolution, this plasma TV seems like a steal. After all, it is an enhanced-definition television.
Sharp LCD TV: 88/100
Although the Sharp 37G4U LCD television is a good unit, its price seems a bit high for a 37-inch widescreen display, high definition or not. This really goes to show how expensive LCD screens can get when they approach HD-quality pixel counts, as this one does.
In a head-to-head competition, Panasonic's TH-37PWD6UY and TH-37PD25UP plasma TVs bested their flat-panel display cousin, the Sharp 37G4U LCD TV. Plasma technology's margin of victory has shrunk over time, except where price/value is concerned.
OVERALL RATINGS (with Picture double-weighted)
Panasonic Plasma TV: 93.75/100
Sharp LCD TV: 91.5/100
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Old 06-05-2005, 04:40 PM   #8  
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Originally Posted by myers830
$4500 for a 37" anything is totally foolish. The Sharp Aquos 37" (the BEST LCD in existance) was in fact reveiwed next to a $1600 37" ED Panny and lost in every category except life expectancy and even that part of it is a moot point since 60,000 hours for a Plasma is many, many years of use. When I find the link to that article..I will be very glad to post it here. The poster's question was which 37" is the best bang for the buck....it's NO contest. LCD has a long way to go to come up to PLasma standards....blacks, grey levels, contrast ratios, viewing angle, motion blur, color saturation, and the list goes on and on...are better on Plasma, and getting better all the time. If not for the "burn-in" issue, LCDs would be totally irrelevant as far as fixed-pixel displays go....and having 2 Plasmas myself, one 4 years old....the burn-in issue is fast becoming a non-issue.
There are still things to be mentioned here... the 37" Sharp Aquos has a much higher resolution than the 37" Panasonic Plasma: 854x480 compared to the LCD's resolution of 1366x768. This is true HD, meaning a much clearer, more detailed picture. You can also sit much closer to the screen and not get that disgusting SDE (Screen Door Effect). Having to sit a distance away from the 37" Panasonic Plasma to eliminate SDE means you get a smaller screen, as it's further away.

Blacks and grey levels may not be quite as good as Plasma, but in a fairly well lit room, it's hardly noticeable at all. And the Sharp would be the best LCD I've ever seen when it comes to reproducing good blacks.

Motion blur is something that only happens with LCD TVs that have a response time more than 16ms. 16ms = 63fps (frames per second). At this rate, the fps EXCEEDS that of normal broadcast video - which reaches no more than 60fps. So motion blur is a MOOT issue with good LCD sets that have a response time of 16ms or less (such as the 37" Sharp).

Reviews should be taken with a grain of salt: the contrast ratio may be higher on Plasma, but in REAL WORLD situations, LCD exceeds Plasma in contrast. Read this review if you don't believe me . And here's a quote from it:

Quote:
Contrast Ratios

Current plasmas measure contrast ratios of up to 3000:1. However, when compared to LCD TVs in "real world" situations, contrast ratios for plasma TVs drop to approximately 200:1.*

LCD TV contrast ratios are measured using "real world" standards. Typical contrast ratios range from 350-450:1.

LCD TVs contrast ratios measured in real world situations double typical plasma TVs.

* source = NEC-Mitsubishi white paper
There's no point in reading reviews. Most are biased against a particular technology. For example, would a magazine bash Plasma technology as a whole, when the majority of their advertising revenue comes from Plasma manufacturers? An interesting point I read...
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Old 06-05-2005, 04:48 PM   #9  
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Oh and BTW, when it comes to value for money, the 37" Panasonic is better than the Sharp LCD. BUT you get what you pay for... not as high resolution (only ED compared to TRUE HD), the possibility of burn in etc. I don't live in the US, but when it comes to pricing, $4500 is not lowest price on the Sharp. This site lists prices at different retailers in the US, with some selling the Sharp 37" at under US$3000... $1500 less than what you stated.
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Old 06-05-2005, 06:43 PM   #10  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTV_NZ

Reviews should be taken with a grain of salt: the contrast ratio may be higher on Plasma, but in REAL WORLD situations, LCD exceeds Plasma in contrast. Read this review if you don't believe me . And here's a quote from it:

Current plasmas measure contrast ratios of up to 3000:1. However, when compared to LCD TVs in "real world" situations, contrast ratios for plasma TVs drop to approximately 200:1.*
* source = NEC-Mitsubishi white paper

That's from an older NEC Model (Which along with most other Brands had very poor Contrast Ratio ).
The current Models of the same Brands have much better CR (real world ).


Quote:
LCD TV contrast ratios are measured using "real world" standards. Typical contrast ratios range from 350-450:1.

LCD TVs contrast ratios measured in real world situations double typical plasma TVs.
Not compared to a Panasonic Plasma TV...

In "real world" - In this case a calibrated - 2001 Panasonic 42" ED Display already had 600-650:1 CR (750-800:1 Peak).



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Last edited by BruZZi; 06-05-2005 at 06:45 PM..
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Old 06-05-2005, 07:28 PM   #11  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruZZi
That's from an older NEC Model (Which along with most other Brands had very poor Contrast Ratio ).
The current Models of the same Brands have much better CR (real world ).
How old? The review was dated December 2004.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BruZZi
Not compared to a Panasonic Plasma TV...

In "real world" - In this case a calibrated - 2001 Panasonic 42" ED Display already had 600-650:1 CR (750-800:1 Peak).
Could you post a link to this information about the Panasonic's CR in "real world" situations? Thanks.
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Old 06-05-2005, 08:56 PM   #12  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTV_NZ
How old? The review was dated December 2004.
Yup but with outdated info.

Newer NEC (Now Pioneer) Plasmas have around 400:1 CR (calibrated).



Quote:
Could you post a link to this information about the Panasonic's CR in "real world" situations? Thanks.
Check out these great Plasma/LCD comparisons by Peter H. Putman :





Video System's 2001 Plasma Round-Up

  • Fujitsu PDS-4229
  • NEC PS-61MP1
  • Panasonic TH-50PHD3U
  • Pioneer PDP-503CMX
  • Sampo PME-42V3
  • Sony PFM-42B1
Link to the Article: http://bg.videosystems.com/ar/video_glass_menagerie/





Video System's 2002 Plasma and LCD Monitor Round-Up

  • Fujitsu PDS-5003
  • Hitachi CMP-4121HDU
  • NEC PS-42MP4
  • NEC PS-50MP2
  • Panasonic TH-37PWD4UZ
  • Pioneer PDP-433CMX
  • Sony PFM-32C1
  • Sony PFM-50C1
  • Zenith P42W22
  • Samsung SM-241MP
  • Sharp LC-30HV2U
Links to the Article:http://www.hdtvexpert.com/pages/plasma4.html






Video System's 2003 Plasma and LCD Monitor Round-Up

  • Hitachi CMP-4201
  • NEC PS-42PV4
  • Panasonic TH-42PWD6UY
  • Philips 32FD9954
  • V Inc. Vizio-P4
  • NEC LCD-4000
Link to the Article: http://bg.videosystems.com/ar/video_...tion/index.htm




AV VMP Reviews Five New LCD & Plasma Monitors - 2004



  • NEC PX-61MX2A
  • Pioneer PDP-504MX
  • Sony PFM-42X
  • Barco Solaris LC40M
  • LG L4200A
Link to the Article: http://www.hdtvexpert.com/pages/fullhouse.htm






I had few more links with reviews but unfortunately I lost them all when my HD crashed few months ago (Forgot to BU )



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Last edited by BruZZi; 06-05-2005 at 09:01 PM..
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Old 06-05-2005, 09:52 PM   #13  
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Thanks. Provides some interesting and detailed comparisons.
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Old 07-11-2005, 12:04 AM   #14  
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I just bought a Sharp actually...got it for $2400 refurbished. Looks great. Black levels are just about as good as you're gonna find on an LCD..TURE HD resolution is key. I wasn't gonna settled for ED. And also i play video games constantly and also a big ESPN watcher....the thought of burn in played a big part. and most importantly....not only do LCD's have a longer life span....but the sharp tv has user replacable light blubs that are about $250...basically....this tv will be with me for a while.
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Old 07-13-2005, 08:42 AM   #15  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thug541
I just bought a Sharp actually...got it for $2400 refurbished. Looks great. Black levels are just about as good as you're
Which model did you get exactly?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thug541
gonna find on an LCD..TURE HD resolution is key. I wasn't gonna settled for ED. And also i play video games constantly and also a big ESPN watcher...
How does fast motion on ESPN look - is there noticeable blur? I've read others posting that there shouldn't be, but I think I've seen some motion blur in the stores. But then again the setup in those stores is probably not so great.
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