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New Panny 42PD25UP vs. 42PD50U -price worth it?

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Old 04-13-2005, 08:41 PM   #1
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Default New Panny 42PD25UP vs. 42PD50U -price worth it?

I can get the old model Panasonic 42PD25UP for $1850 open box at my local circuit city. The new model 42PD50U for $2299, maybe $2149 if I haggle some more. Does the new model have that much better of a screen than the old one to justify $449 price difference? It seems as though the 42PD25UP has a few more features, and cable card- which is nice. The new one is 8th gen and the old one is 6th, does that only matter with the life of the plasma? (I don't watch that much tv, I don't think I would use one up. Any suggestions? I'm kind of leaning towards last years open box, but was hoping for some insight.
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Old 04-14-2005, 05:33 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by Skankin56
I can get the old model Panasonic 42PD25UP for $1850 open box at my local circuit city. The new model 42PD50U for $2299, maybe $2149 if I haggle some more. Does the new model have that much better of a screen than the old one to justify $449 price difference? It seems as though the 42PD25UP has a few more features, and cable card- which is nice. The new one is 8th gen and the old one is 6th, does that only matter with the life of the plasma? (I don't watch that much tv, I don't think I would use one up. Any suggestions? I'm kind of leaning towards last years open box, but was hoping for some insight.
NEVER buy an open box Plasma. They don't break them in at the store properly. They keep the contrast and brightness settings set very high (right our of the box)... which is not a good thing when breaking in a new Plasma. I would not get the 6th generation either given the choice. The phosphors on the 7th generation (and now the 8th) have double the life span of the older 6th (60,000 hours vs. 30,000 hours). Congrats on the decision to go with the Panny Plasma.
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Old 04-14-2005, 06:54 AM   #3
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Default Open Box-BAD

I agree with Myers, don't buy the open box set!!! You don't know how long it's been on, what the settings were, what kind of burn in there may be. Go with the PD50, it's a bit more but you know EXACTLY what you're getting and in what condition it is.
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Old 04-14-2005, 07:51 AM   #4
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Default Questions?

I am considering buying my first Plasma, but I have a question regarding the PD50. Will I need a cable box since this does not have a video card slot?
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Old 04-14-2005, 08:26 AM   #5
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Default lack of cable card slot

Quote:
Originally Posted by Catfish
I am considering buying my first Plasma, but I have a question regarding the PD50. Will I need a cable box since this does not have a video card slot?
you are correct, you will need a set top box since the PD50 does not have a cable card slot.
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Old 04-14-2005, 03:52 PM   #6
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Thanks for the heads up guys! I asked how long the plasma had been set up, they looked in their records and said 3 month or so. Either way, I will steer clear of it.
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Old 04-14-2005, 05:09 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by myers830
NEVER buy an open box Plasma. They don't break them in at the store properly. They keep the contrast and brightness settings set very high (right our of the box)... which is not a good thing when breaking in a new Plasma. I would not get the 6th generation either given the choice. The phosphors on the 7th generation (and now the 8th) have double the life span of the older 6th (60,000 hours vs. 30,000 hours). Congrats on the decision to go with the Panny Plasma.
I wish everyone could get this correct the pd25u/p also has 60k half life as I've been told by 2 panny techs and panny advertised this on their website. Read the panny white paper article, read the faq section on the panny site and it is concerning the consumer models. There is a thread about this that we all discussed about 3 days ago.
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Old 04-14-2005, 05:11 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myers830
NEVER buy an open box Plasma. They don't break them in at the store properly. They keep the contrast and brightness settings set very high (right our of the box)... which is not a good thing when breaking in a new Plasma. I would not get the 6th generation either given the choice. The phosphors on the 7th generation (and now the 8th) have double the life span of the older 6th (60,000 hours vs. 30,000 hours). Congrats on the decision to go with the Panny Plasma.
This is for 6th gen consumer models

This if for 6th gen consumer models:


View by: Date CreatedAudioComputer PeripheralsDigital Still CamerasDVDGeneralHome AppliancesHome Office ProductsHospitality Industry ProductsIndustrial/CommercialLighting ProductsMusical InstrumentsNetworking ProductsOtherPersonal Care ProductsSD Memory CardTelephone and FaxTelevisionVideo Products

WHITE PAPER



Plasma Facts and Myths

Panasonic Presents Advice From the Video Purist Perspective

Commissioned by: Panasonic

November 2004



Executive Summary

The 21st Century display technology called plasma TV looks, operates and performs unlike any previous device. No other television today offers the form factor, screen size and performance of plasma. The purpose of this report is to provide in-depth information about plasma technology. You will learn how plasma operates, the truth about plasma life span, the so-called uneven

aging phenomenon, and maintenance. Performance criteria will also be examined so you can determine if a plasma panel is right for you.



How It Works

Plasma displays use three types of phosphors (red, green, and blue). Like a standard cathode ray tube (CRT) TV the phosphors glow to create an image. The difference lies in the way the phosphors glow. In a CRT, electrons strike the phosphors causing them to glow. A plasma display contains a combination of inert gases. Electrodes inside the glass panel charge the gas, resulting in the production of invisible ultra violet (UV) light. When the UV light strikes the phosphors, they glow, producing a brilliant picture.



Advantages of Plasma

Plasma TVs offer excellent color saturation, very wide viewing angles in both horizontal and vertical planes, and are equaled only by the bulky flat-faced direct-view sets based on traditional CRT technology. Their rapid response times assure crisp images even when fast motion is present, such as when viewing football or other fast-moving sporting events. Plasma televisions provide image brightness at a level far higher than large-screen projection displays, allowing for viewing in areas of high ambient light without washing out picture detail. (There are no direct-view CRT sets with comparable screen sizes to plasmas that are 42 inches or larger.) Panasonic black levels are close to direct view CRT levels, permitting superb deep blacks and outstanding viewing in dark environments. Panasonic contrast ratios are rated as high as 4000:1. Current LCD flat panels cannot achieve the dark black levels or contrast ratios of plasma in a home theater environment. Panasonic makes plasma panels in widescreen (16:9 aspect ratio) with

enhanced-definition, commonly known as 480p, (37” & 42” have 852 pixels measured horizontally (H) by 480 pixels measured vertically (V)) and high definition resolutions (37”=1024H x 720V; 42”= 1024 H x 768 V; 50” and 65” 1366 H x 768 V).



Lifespan

There has been much misinformation about the longevity of today’s plasma TVs. Like all other display devices, there are two parts to a television. The first is the internal electronics. Modern circuit designs are extremely reliable and all televisions, including plasma’s circuits, are designed to provide extremely long life. The second part is the section of the television that produces light.

In plasma, it is the phosphors within the glass panel. Phosphors are used to produce an image in standard picture tube (CRT) televisions as well, and in three-CRT rear projectors.



Television manufacturers base the projected life of all TVs on “half brightness,” meaning the time it takes for the display to create an image that’s only half as bright as when the TV was new. The three-CRT rear projector is generally rated at 15,000 hours until half-brightness. Direct-view CRTs are generally rated to 30,000 hours. Panasonic plasmas have a half brightness rating of 60,000 hours – four times the life of CRT rear projection. This equates to more than twenty-three years at seven hours a day viewing, around the average daily TV viewing time per U.S. household. With its inherent high brightness, a Panasonic plasma will likely retain its image

quality for many years.



Myths Regarding Plasma Televisions

While a CRT direct-view television is an analog device that uses a picture tube and the plasma is a digital device, there are many similarities between the two technologies. As noted, each display uses phosphors to create light. While a direct-view picture tube operates in a vacuum, and the plasma screen uses inert gases, both are completely sealed. There is no possibility of the gas leaking out (barring physically breaking the panel), and there is never a need to “recharge” or “refill” the plasma panel. Conversely, there is no possibility of moisture leaking in, it can never “fog up” like a car windshield and, unlike an incandescent light bulb, a plasma panel doesn’t suddenly “burn out.”



Power Consumption

All Panasonic plasmas are Energy Star® compliant insuring low power consumption in standby mode (a mere 18 watts), when compared with non-Energy Star® models. The maximum power consumption during use depends on screen size; the 37-inch diagonal models, for example, are rated at 345 watts maximum. However, typical power consumption is much lower and

varies depending on picture content and display settings such as brightness and contrast. With typical content and display settings, Panasonic plasmas have virtually the same power consumption as similar-sized LCD TVs.
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Old 04-14-2005, 05:12 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myers830
NEVER buy an open box Plasma. They don't break them in at the store properly. They keep the contrast and brightness settings set very high (right our of the box)... which is not a good thing when breaking in a new Plasma. I would not get the 6th generation either given the choice. The phosphors on the 7th generation (and now the 8th) have double the life span of the older 6th (60,000 hours vs. 30,000 hours). Congrats on the decision to go with the Panny Plasma.
one last tidbit this is the for the faq page

Lastly go to this page at panny's site and read the question/answer column for consumer/commercial panels and you will read 60k
http://www.panasonic.com/consumer_e...site/flash.asp? this has been there for a year. hope this clears up the 60k question on 25u's
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Old 04-14-2005, 06:57 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hdaddict
one last tidbit this is the for the faq page

Lastly go to this page at panny's site and read the question/answer column for consumer/commercial panels and you will read 60k
http://www.panasonic.com/consumer_e...site/flash.asp? this has been there for a year. hope this clears up the 60k question on 25u's
See the Brochure for the Panasonic "6UY" Commercial Models
(Same PDP used on the "25" )

ftp://ftp.panasonic.com/pub/Panasoni...H-42PWD6UY.pdf
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Old 04-14-2005, 07:59 PM   #11
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See the Brochure for the Panasonic "6UY" Commercial Models
(Same PDP used on the "25" )

ftp://ftp.panasonic.com/pub/Panasoni...H-42PWD6UY.pdf
Thanks Bruzzi that further verifies that the pd25u/p has panel life of 60k half life. I wish everyone would make sure about this before they tell potential buyers that it only has 30k half life.
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Old 04-15-2005, 03:22 AM   #12
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The bottom line is.....get the 60,000 hour unit, regardless of debating and quoting pages and pages of stuff. Its not brain surgery to want to get a unit with double the life of a previous generation. I still clain the commercial models are built much better than the consumer models...THEY have to be...just look where they put these units....airports, sports arenas, news desks, news studios. These folks have no clue how to break in a plasma or run them correctly...yet they last and last in environments that would never be found in the average home. I have a Panasonic techie friend that assures me the consumer models do not use as good quality circuit boards as the commercial units and of course they want to sell you extended warranties because of that. Also, I choose to not have a TV with all that extra stuff included (sound, tuners, jacks of all kinds) because the technology changes so fast, they are obsolete when you buy them. I want to have my own designed sound system to change when the technology changes. I don't need a tuner...I don't want several ports when I only need 2 or 3 and I have the option to add as many as I want WHEN I need them...and I want a box that is made to last longer than the usual norm. I also love the commercial units black color and bezel. It looks awesome on the wall.
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Old 04-16-2005, 03:28 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myers830
The bottom line is.....get the 60,000 hour unit, regardless of debating and quoting pages and pages of stuff. Its not brain surgery to want to get a unit with double the life of a previous generation. I still clain the commercial models are built much better than the consumer models...THEY have to be...just look where they put these units....airports, sports arenas, news desks, news studios. These folks have no clue how to break in a plasma or run them correctly...yet they last and last in environments that would never be found in the average home. I have a Panasonic techie friend that assures me the consumer models do not use as good quality circuit boards as the commercial units and of course they want to sell you extended warranties because of that. Also, I choose to not have a TV with all that extra stuff included (sound, tuners, jacks of all kinds) because the technology changes so fast, they are obsolete when you buy them. I want to have my own designed sound system to change when the technology changes. I don't need a tuner...I don't want several ports when I only need 2 or 3 and I have the option to add as many as I want WHEN I need them...and I want a box that is made to last longer than the usual norm. I also love the commercial units black color and bezel. It looks awesome on the wall.
No one is debating that the commercial unit is constructed better, we were verifying that the 25u has 60k 1/2 life. I like the cablecard feature cause I feel pq is better with it than through stb imo. I dont care so much about the unit having speakers but it is nice when I dont want to fire up my stereo/ht system just to watch regular t.v.. I have a lot of money invested in my hi-fi/ht setup and dont want to waste it on broadcast television. I use it when watching movies and really mostly for music. Guess I'm not a true videophile as I'm more an audiophile............All I know is my 25u looks awesome on HD broadcasts using ota or through cablecard and thats all that matters.
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Old 04-17-2005, 01:28 AM   #14
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Default Panny 42PD50 screen refreshes?

Sometimes when I change the channel on my TV I see a set of white lines in a random pattern running across the screen. Lasts for about 1/2 second or so. It doesnt happen all the time but sometimes when I chage channels it does.


Anyone else experiencing the same.


Thanks
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Old 04-17-2005, 03:50 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rohan25
Sometimes when I change the channel on my TV I see a set of white lines in a random pattern running across the screen. Lasts for about 1/2 second or so. It doesnt happen all the time but sometimes when I chage channels it does.


Anyone else experiencing the same.


Thanks
I see the same lines at times but on mine they are usually green and just for a sec between channel changes.
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