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1080p is disappointing

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Old 05-12-2014, 12:05 PM   #1  
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Default 1080p is disappointing

With my new Samsung TV that supports 1080p, I downloaded two 1080p movies so far via VOD. But I have not noticed any difference in resolution from regular HD films I have downloaded in the past. Yes, 1080p is checked in my TV resolution settings. Is this the best I can expect or have I missed something?
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Old 05-12-2014, 12:15 PM   #2  
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What do you mean by ' from regular HD films I have downloaded in the past' ?

Bottom line for film based material - 1080i (60) and 1080p(30) will look exactly the same if interlaced properly unless you have blu-ray (or certain vod/ppv specifically labeled 1080p24) which handles 1080p24. Even then the difference is very subtle and mainly only affects smoothness of motion
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Old 05-12-2014, 01:04 PM   #3  
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Yep, 1080 = 1080. The letters don't really mean anything on a high quality TV
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Old 05-12-2014, 01:48 PM   #4  
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Originally Posted by jkkyler View Post
What do you mean by ' from regular HD films I have downloaded in the past' ?

Bottom line for film based material - 1080i (60) and 1080p(30) will look exactly the same if interlaced properly unless you have blu-ray (or certain vod/ppv specifically labeled 1080p24) which handles 1080p24. Even then the difference is very subtle and mainly only affects smoothness of motion
What Iím saying is that Blu-ray movies played on my Blu-ray player actually look better than the 1080p movies downloaded from VOD. With all the hype surrounding 1080p I was expecting something better.

I should mention that the two 1080p movies I downloaded were free. Your post seems to suggest if they were ppv the resolution could be higher. Is that true?
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Old 05-12-2014, 04:00 PM   #5  
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What Iím saying is that Blu-ray movies played on my Blu-ray player actually look better than the 1080p movies downloaded from VOD. With all the hype surrounding 1080p I was expecting something better.

I should mention that the two 1080p movies I downloaded were free. Your post seems to suggest if they were ppv the resolution could be higher. Is that true?
Movies from bluray will always be better than the same movie from VOD. The bandwidth available from bluray (which is also delivering 1080p) is significantly higher than anything DirecTV can provide via the satellite, even when it is a 1080p PPV movie..
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Old 05-13-2014, 05:13 AM   #6  
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Blu-Ray is shown in 1080p/60 Frames per second - While Download 1080p/24 Frames per second - That is the difference
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Old 05-13-2014, 06:30 AM   #7  
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Blu-Ray is shown in 1080p/60 Frames per second - While Download 1080p/24 Frames per second - That is the difference
Incorrect - virtually all Blu-ray is 1080p24.
Blu-ray can decode video at 1080i60, 1080p30, 1080p24, 720p60, and various SD resolutions but it can't decode video at 1080p60

The reason blu-ray looks better is lack of compression (higher bitrate)
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Old 05-13-2014, 03:11 PM   #8  
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The Westinghouse LVM-42w2 LCD

does not support 1080p via its HDMI input.


I just came back from doing an extensive test at BEST BUY...

the 1080p (1920x1080) works via the VGA and DVI... I tested them both with my laptop and both LOOK AMAZING... !

however... when we hooked up the Samsung Blu-ray player, It would only support 1080i...

we then took the blu-ray player over to the 60inch Samsung DLP and it automatically switched to 1080p.

Apparently the HDMI input on the Westinghouse is version 1.2... and this is not capable of running true 1080p.. only HDMI v1.3 can do that.

according to the westinghouse website the monitor is capable of 1080p reproduction.

I still bought the tv-http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000E7RACK/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creat ive=9325&creativeASIN=B000E7RACK&linkCode=as2&tag= nativetaste-20&linkId=33WAWZHAG5VK3HIY
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Old 05-13-2014, 04:10 PM   #9  
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It is not enough to just specify the resolution, you also have to denote a frame rate. many tvs can accept certain resolutions but only at particular frame rates. also the type of signal that it's getting matters whether its Blu ray or satellite or cable or OTA as there are varying amounts of compression based on what format you receive. There is a lot of mixing of apples and oranges going on in this thread
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Old 05-13-2014, 08:38 PM   #10  
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As much as I appreciate all the responses so far, I donít really understand the technical jargon. All I know is that when I finally could view 1080p on my new TV it was a letdown.
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Old 05-13-2014, 10:29 PM   #11  
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Incorrect - virtually all Blu-ray is 1080p24.
Blu-ray can decode video at 1080i60, 1080p30, 1080p24, 720p60, and various SD resolutions but it can't decode video at 1080p60

The reason blu-ray looks better is lack of compression (higher bitrate)
Correct. Many (all?) bluray players can output 1080p/60 but it's still only 24 fps of real information. It's an upconversion just like your 1080p TV will do. As jkkyler says, the reason bluray looks better is higher bandwidth/bitrate. As I remember, bluray will deliver at over 45MBps, direcTV peaks at about 16Mbps.
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:49 AM   #12  
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Correct. Many (all?) bluray players can output 1080p/60 but it's still only 24 fps of real information. It's an upconversion just like your 1080p TV will do. As jkkyler says, the reason bluray looks better is higher bandwidth/bitrate. As I remember, bluray will deliver at over 45MBps, direcTV peaks at about 16Mbps.

Once again terms are being confused- NO BLU-RAY content is encoded at 1080p60- blu-rays are encoded at the following resolutions 1080i60, 1080p30, 1080p24, 720p60 and various sd resolution.

What you are talking about is using 3:2 pulldown to get cadence matching - a conversion from 24fps to a multiple of 30 fps (either 30 or 60) that is not upconversion (nor is it downconversion) , upconversion is scaling a lower resolution to a higher one.

Once again a lot of terms are being mis-used and intermingled (btw few tv's accept a native 1080p60 signal but that is anothe rmatter).

The takeaway is that it is not the resolution nor is it the cadence that varies the picture quality but the amount of compression/decompression used to transmit or relay the signal.
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:28 AM   #13  
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The other takeaway is that the term 1080p is largely a means for marketing hype. In addition to being an incomplete specification without the frame rate being stated, it also by itself does not provide any improvement. It is however a tremendous marking tool and now necessary for everything to have, even cell phones and tablets!
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Old 05-14-2014, 05:56 PM   #14  
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Originally Posted by jkkyler View Post
Once again terms are being confused- NO BLU-RAY content is encoded at 1080p60- blu-rays are encoded at the following resolutions 1080i60, 1080p30, 1080p24, 720p60 and various sd resolution.

What you are talking about is using 3:2 pulldown to get cadence matching - a conversion from 24fps to a multiple of 30 fps (either 30 or 60) that is not upconversion (nor is it downconversion) , upconversion is scaling a lower resolution to a higher one.

Once again a lot of terms are being mis-used and intermingled (btw few tv's accept a native 1080p60 signal but that is anothe rmatter).

The takeaway is that it is not the resolution nor is it the cadence that varies the picture quality but the amount of compression/decompression used to transmit or relay the signal.
So what did I say that is different from this? (Except for using the term upconversion when going from 1080p24 to 1080p 60.)
And there are many TVs that will accept 1080p 60. The problem is that some TVs won't accept 1080p 24, which is why some people have to set their DirecTv box to deliver 1080i.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:47 PM   #15  
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My incorrect remark was geared toward westdc statement that Blu-ray is shown in 1080p60.

Last I checked many more tv's accepted 1080p24 than 1080p60 typically it was 1080i, 720p 1080p24 but things are everchanging and perhaps more accept 1080p60 now but there is very little no content that is 1080p60
and most of it is home video.
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