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How can I tell if my Monoprice HDMI is Category 2 Certified?

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Old 01-06-2009, 03:23 PM   #1
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Default How can I tell if my Monoprice HDMI is Category 2 Certified?

I purchased this HDMI cable from Monoprice: Item number 3992: HDMI 1.3a Category 2 Certified AWG28 6 feet.

http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2

I received it yesterday and am concerned if they actually sent me the right cable. The packaging is correct, but it mentions nothing to the effect of Category 2 Certification on the cables sleeve.

If anyone that has the same cable that wants to do me a huge favor (and give me some peace of mind), can you check your cable and compare what it says to mine. Here is what mine says:

E1119932 (some kind of symbol) AWM STYLE 20276 80 degrees C 30V VW-1 HDMI1.3 CABLE COPARTNER

I would appreciate anyones help!

Last edited by rwwong; 01-06-2009 at 03:41 PM..
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Old 01-06-2009, 07:30 PM   #2
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Monoprice has terrific customer service. Give them a call/email them, and they'll either confirm the cable is genuine or they'll send you the correct one.
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Old 01-06-2009, 08:28 PM   #3
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I bought one 6 months ago and it says EXACTLY what your says!

E1119932 (symbol) AWM STYLE 20276 80 degrees C 30V VW-1 HDMI1.3 CABLE COPARTNER

Hope that helps
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Old 01-07-2009, 05:58 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peekobi View Post
I bought one 6 months ago and it says EXACTLY what your says!

E1119932 (symbol) AWM STYLE 20276 80 degrees C 30V VW-1 HDMI1.3 CABLE COPARTNER

Hope that helps
Thanks peekobi, appreciate your help!
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Old 01-07-2009, 07:34 AM   #5
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Cat. 2 cables should be marked-- but you may not actually need Cat 2 cables as Cat 1 may work just fine . . . Many cable were designed, manufactured to meet Cat 2 requirements but were not marked as such, as the marking requirement is relatively new. If it is an HDMI 1.3x cable, it probably will perform just fine; how ever on LONG cables, it may be worth the price to seek out a marked & certified Cat 2 cable. ALWAYS test the cables before putting them in a wall.

"The HDMI specification does not define a maximum cable length, but because of signal attenuation there is an upper limit to how long HDMI cables can be made.[55] The length of the HDMI cable made depends on the construction quality and materials that were used.[55] The signal attenuation and intersymbol interference which is caused by long cables can be compensated by using adaptive equalization.

HDMI 1.3 has defined two categories of cables: Category 1 certified cables which have been tested at 74.5 MHz (1080i/720p) and Category 2 certified cables which have been tested at 340 MHz (1600p) to reduce the confusion about which cables support which video formats.[56] A Category 1 HDMI cable will be marketed as a "Standard HDMI cable" and a Category 2 HDMI cable will be marketed as a "High Speed HDMI cable".[1] This labeling guideline for HDMI cables went into effect on October 17, 2008.[57][58] Category 1 and 2 cables can either meet the required parameter specifications for inter-pair skew, far-end crosstalk, attenuation, and differential impedance or they can meet the required non-equalized/equalized eye diagram requirements.[56] A cheaply made cable of about 5 meters (16 ft) can be manufactured to Category 1 specifications using 28 AWG conductors.[55] With better quality construction and materials (24 AWG conductors) an HDMI cable can reach lengths of up to 15 meters (49 ft).[55] The HDMI website has stated that many HDMI cables under 5 meters of length that were made before the HDMI 1.3 specification can work as a Category 2 cable but cautions that only Category 2 tested cables are guaranteed to work.[59] Long cable lengths can cause instability of HDCP and blinking on the screen due to the weakened DDC signal which HDCP requires. HDCP DDC signals must be multiplexed with TMDS video signals to be compliant with HDCP requirements for HDMI extenders based on a single Category 5/Category 6 cable.[60][61] Several companies offer amplifiers, equalizers, and repeaters that can string several standard HDMI cables together. Active HDMI cables use electronics within the cable to boost the signal and allow for HDMI cables of up to 30 meters (98 ft).[62] HDMI extenders that are based on dual Category 5/Category 6 cable can extend HDMI to 50 meters (164 ft) while HDMI extenders based on optical fiber can extend HDMI to 100+ meters (328 ft).[55][62]
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Old 01-07-2009, 08:30 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick-F View Post
Cat. 2 cables should be marked-- but you may not actually need Cat 2 cables as Cat 1 may work just fine . . . Many cable were designed, manufactured to meet Cat 2 requirements but were not marked as such, as the marking requirement is relatively new. If it is an HDMI 1.3x cable, it probably will perform just fine; how ever on LONG cables, it may be worth the price to seek out a marked & certified Cat 2 cable. ALWAYS test the cables before putting them in a wall.

"The HDMI specification does not define a maximum cable length, but because of signal attenuation there is an upper limit to how long HDMI cables can be made.[55] The length of the HDMI cable made depends on the construction quality and materials that were used.[55] The signal attenuation and intersymbol interference which is caused by long cables can be compensated by using adaptive equalization.

HDMI 1.3 has defined two categories of cables: Category 1 certified cables which have been tested at 74.5 MHz (1080i/720p) and Category 2 certified cables which have been tested at 340 MHz (1600p) to reduce the confusion about which cables support which video formats.[56] A Category 1 HDMI cable will be marketed as a "Standard HDMI cable" and a Category 2 HDMI cable will be marketed as a "High Speed HDMI cable".[1] This labeling guideline for HDMI cables went into effect on October 17, 2008.[57][58] Category 1 and 2 cables can either meet the required parameter specifications for inter-pair skew, far-end crosstalk, attenuation, and differential impedance or they can meet the required non-equalized/equalized eye diagram requirements.[56] A cheaply made cable of about 5 meters (16 ft) can be manufactured to Category 1 specifications using 28 AWG conductors.[55] With better quality construction and materials (24 AWG conductors) an HDMI cable can reach lengths of up to 15 meters (49 ft).[55] The HDMI website has stated that many HDMI cables under 5 meters of length that were made before the HDMI 1.3 specification can work as a Category 2 cable but cautions that only Category 2 tested cables are guaranteed to work.[59] Long cable lengths can cause instability of HDCP and blinking on the screen due to the weakened DDC signal which HDCP requires. HDCP DDC signals must be multiplexed with TMDS video signals to be compliant with HDCP requirements for HDMI extenders based on a single Category 5/Category 6 cable.[60][61] Several companies offer amplifiers, equalizers, and repeaters that can string several standard HDMI cables together. Active HDMI cables use electronics within the cable to boost the signal and allow for HDMI cables of up to 30 meters (98 ft).[62] HDMI extenders that are based on dual Category 5/Category 6 cable can extend HDMI to 50 meters (164 ft) while HDMI extenders based on optical fiber can extend HDMI to 100+ meters (328 ft).[55][62]
Rick, actually in speaking to HDMI.org, cable manuacturers are not required to label category certifications on the sleeve itself, read what you posted "A Category 1 HDMI cable will be marketed as a "Standard HDMI cable" and a Category 2 HDMI cable will be marketed as a "High Speed HDMI cable".[1] [COLOR="Red"]This labeling guideline for HDMI cables went into effect on October 17." In other words, it just has to be marketed as either High Speed or Standard, i.e. packaging.
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