High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource

Go Back   High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource >
Rules HDTV Forum Gallery LINK TO US! RSS - High Def Forum AddThis Feed Button AddThis Social Bookmark Button Groups

Blu-Ray and Ultra HD Blu-Ray Players Blu-Ray Players

Samsung To Add HDR10+ Playback To 2017 4K Blu-ray Players

Reply
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-09-2018, 06:47 PM   #1  
Muscle Cars Forever!
Thread Starter
 
Lee Stewart's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 47,187
Arrow Samsung To Add HDR10+ Playback To 2017 4K Blu-ray Players

Samsung To Add HDR10+ Playback To 2017 4K Blu-ray Players

Samsung has confirmed to me at the CES that it is going to be rolling out firmware updates to its 2017 4K Blu-ray players enabling them to play films mastered in the new HDR10+ format.

The three players set to receive the HDR10+ update are the M9500, M8500 and M7500. Samsung wouldnít put an exact date on when the firmware update might start to propagate, but it said it will definitely be in the first half of 2018 - maybe even towards the end of the first quarter.

Once the update has been installed, M9500, M8500 and M7500 4K Blu-ray players will be able to play the new generation of 4K Blu-rays from 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros that carry the HDR10+ dynamic metadata format. This delivers better picture quality results than the HDR10 industry standard currently used on most 4K Blu-ray discs by adding a layer of extra scene by scene picture information, to help TVs optimize the way they play the content back.

Before M9500, M8500 and M7500 owners get too excited, you should bear in mind that you will also need to own a TV thatís capable of playing HDR10+ pictures.

Also, while these players might be getting the new HDR10+ format, they will not also be getting support for the rival Dolby Vision dynamic metadata HDR system used on a growing number of 4K Blu-ray discs. Currently the only 4K Blu-ray player in the world that will play both formats is the recently announced Panasonic DP-UB820, set to go on sale in the spring. Though actually this dual format compatibility is something of a moot feature considering that at the time of writing no brand has announced a TV that will play both formats.

Itís worth adding, too, that this update news prompted me to ask Samsung for the umpteenth time if its 2016 TVs will be upgraded to handle HDR10+, as promised in the press release announcing HDR10+ that Samsung put out last April. Unfortunately I still wasnít able to get a definitive answer; just another assurance that theyíre still looking into it. But the vibe Iím getting isnít positive.

Letís not get too downbeat, though. The bottom line is that the M9500, M8500 and M7500 update is very good news, and raises hopes that other 2017 4K Blu-ray players from other brands might be able to follow suit.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnarc.../#1aa63b54421a
Lee Stewart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2018, 09:32 AM   #2  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 
tvine2000's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: vermont
Posts: 1,275
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post
Samsung To Add HDR10+ Playback To 2017 4K Blu-ray Players

Samsung has confirmed to me at the CES that it is going to be rolling out firmware updates to its 2017 4K Blu-ray players enabling them to play films mastered in the new HDR10+ format.

The three players set to receive the HDR10+ update are the M9500, M8500 and M7500. Samsung wouldnít put an exact date on when the firmware update might start to propagate, but it said it will definitely be in the first half of 2018 - maybe even towards the end of the first quarter.

Once the update has been installed, M9500, M8500 and M7500 4K Blu-ray players will be able to play the new generation of 4K Blu-rays from 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros that carry the HDR10+ dynamic metadata format. This delivers better picture quality results than the HDR10 industry standard currently used on most 4K Blu-ray discs by adding a layer of extra scene by scene picture information, to help TVs optimize the way they play the content back.

Before M9500, M8500 and M7500 owners get too excited, you should bear in mind that you will also need to own a TV thatís capable of playing HDR10+ pictures.

Also, while these players might be getting the new HDR10+ format, they will not also be getting support for the rival Dolby Vision dynamic metadata HDR system used on a growing number of 4K Blu-ray discs. Currently the only 4K Blu-ray player in the world that will play both formats is the recently announced Panasonic DP-UB820, set to go on sale in the spring. Though actually this dual format compatibility is something of a moot feature considering that at the time of writing no brand has announced a TV that will play both formats.

Itís worth adding, too, that this update news prompted me to ask Samsung for the umpteenth time if its 2016 TVs will be upgraded to handle HDR10+, as promised in the press release announcing HDR10+ that Samsung put out last April. Unfortunately I still wasnít able to get a definitive answer; just another assurance that theyíre still looking into it. But the vibe Iím getting isnít positive.

Letís not get too downbeat, though. The bottom line is that the M9500, M8500 and M7500 update is very good news, and raises hopes that other 2017 4K Blu-ray players from other brands might be able to follow suit.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnarc.../#1aa63b54421a
Am I wrong to say this sounds like another format war? I mean Dolby vision has quite a head start and I never have seen HDR-10+. Does Samsung really believe HDR-10+ is going to be the standard? .Also have you seen Dolby vision and if you have is it much different than HDR-10 to your eye?
tvine2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2018, 09:43 AM   #3  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 
tvine2000's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: vermont
Posts: 1,275
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post
Samsung To Add HDR10+ Playback To 2017 4K Blu-ray Players

Samsung has confirmed to me at the CES that it is going to be rolling out firmware updates to its 2017 4K Blu-ray players enabling them to play films mastered in the new HDR10+ format.

The three players set to receive the HDR10+ update are the M9500, M8500 and M7500. Samsung wouldnít put an exact date on when the firmware update might start to propagate, but it said it will definitely be in the first half of 2018 - maybe even towards the end of the first quarter.

Once the update has been installed, M9500, M8500 and M7500 4K Blu-ray players will be able to play the new generation of 4K Blu-rays from 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros that carry the HDR10+ dynamic metadata format. This delivers better picture quality results than the HDR10 industry standard currently used on most 4K Blu-ray discs by adding a layer of extra scene by scene picture information, to help TVs optimize the way they play the content back.

Before M9500, M8500 and M7500 owners get too excited, you should bear in mind that you will also need to own a TV thatís capable of playing HDR10+ pictures.

Also, while these players might be getting the new HDR10+ format, they will not also be getting support for the rival Dolby Vision dynamic metadata HDR system used on a growing number of 4K Blu-ray discs. Currently the only 4K Blu-ray player in the world that will play both formats is the recently announced Panasonic DP-UB820, set to go on sale in the spring. Though actually this dual format compatibility is something of a moot feature considering that at the time of writing no brand has announced a TV that will play both formats.

Itís worth adding, too, that this update news prompted me to ask Samsung for the umpteenth time if its 2016 TVs will be upgraded to handle HDR10+, as promised in the press release announcing HDR10+ that Samsung put out last April. Unfortunately I still wasnít able to get a definitive answer; just another assurance that theyíre still looking into it. But the vibe Iím getting isnít positive.

Letís not get too downbeat, though. The bottom line is that the M9500, M8500 and M7500 update is very good news, and raises hopes that other 2017 4K Blu-ray players from other brands might be able to follow suit.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnarc.../#1aa63b54421a
I wanted to add we go thru this with new audio formats. For example I have Dolby Atmos / DTS X. If you hear the demo disc for Dolby atmos 5.1.2 or 5.1.4 it works so well what we always wanted in audio, but listen to a hollywood movie with Dolby Atmos/ DTS X not so much.It seems to me Hollywood doesn't take advantage of the format and I get they why they mix the track the way they do. Or am I way off base here. My point is these formats never live up to the hype. So is the point with Dolby vision vs HDR-10
tvine2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2018, 12:17 PM   #4  
Muscle Cars Forever!
Thread Starter
 
Lee Stewart's Avatar
 

Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 47,187
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tvine2000 View Post
I wanted to add we go thru this with new audio formats. For example I have Dolby Atmos / DTS X. If you hear the demo disc for Dolby atmos 5.1.2 or 5.1.4 it works so well what we always wanted in audio, but listen to a hollywood movie with Dolby Atmos/ DTS X not so much.It seems to me Hollywood doesn't take advantage of the format and I get they why they mix the track the way they do. Or am I way off base here. My point is these formats never live up to the hype. So is the point with Dolby vision vs HDR-10
Hollywood is famous for taking short cuts and cheaping out when it comes to producing their movies. They seem to think that a logo like Dolby Atmos or DTS X is good enough for "common folks." Sort of like the Emperor's New Clothes.

The HDR situation is a bit different. Dolby Vision was created as a professional HDR format for use in Dolby Theaters. When the original 4K TVs came out there was no HDR, just the increase in resolution. So many reviewers stated that sitting in a normal living room where the TV is approx. 9 feet away - you can't see the increase in resolution. This put the future of 4K UHD in jeopardy. TV OEMs and Hollywood knew they had to do something and they did - added wide color gamut and HDR, both components of Dolby Vision. But consumer TVs are nothing like the professional laser projectors that Dolby uses for their theaters. So SMPTE and Dolby created HDR for home use.

Yes - Dolby helped create HDR10. But it is very limited when it comes to an HDR format. It is not a dynamic HDR format like Dolby Vision which can "grade" HDR on a frame-by-frame and scene-by-scene basis, something that HDR10, which is a static HDR format, can't do.

Adapting Dolby Vision for home use has not been an easy task. All the specs have to be down converted which leads to errors and such. Eventually it will be worked out. This is the problem with being an early adopter, especially when there is great pressure from the TV OEMS who want to sell the latest and greatest.

Hollywood has zero experience working with HDR other than those movies which will play in Dolby Theaters and Dolby is part of the production process when it comes to creating the end product (Digital Intermediate) which only Dolby will use in their theaters.

Of course it doesn't help that there are so many HDR formats with each being slightly different from the others.

Initially ATSC 3.0, the new broadcast format chose Hybrid Log Gamma as it's HDR format over the other formats. But now both Dolby Vision and HDR10+ are saying they too can be used, with modification, for ATSC 3.0. So instead of saying "sorry guys, you had your chance, we are sticking with HLG as our HDR format" ATSC 3.0 is now considering adding additional HDR formats. What this does is add time to the introduction of ATSC 3.0. Longer lead time means consumers have to wait.

I know that hindsight is always crystal clear but there are times when foresight and hindsight match. They are both crystal clear. I am referring to the introduction of High Definition to consumers. It was an industry wide effort with all parties on the same page. This was not the case for Ultra HD. It was and still is a "free-for-all" with no industry wide effort at all. The old expression of "too many cooks spoil the broth" applies. And who is suffering from this? Joe Consumer of course.
Lee Stewart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2018, 09:59 PM   #5  
High Definition is the definition of life.
 
tvine2000's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: vermont
Posts: 1,275
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post
Hollywood is famous for taking short cuts and cheaping out when it comes to producing their movies. They seem to think that a logo like Dolby Atmos or DTS X is good enough for "common folks." Sort of like the Emperor's New Clothes.

The HDR situation is a bit different. Dolby Vision was created as a professional HDR format for use in Dolby Theaters. When the original 4K TVs came out there was no HDR, just the increase in resolution. So many reviewers stated that sitting in a normal living room where the TV is approx. 9 feet away - you can't see the increase in resolution. This put the future of 4K UHD in jeopardy. TV OEMs and Hollywood knew they had to do something and they did - added wide color gamut and HDR, both components of Dolby Vision. But consumer TVs are nothing like the professional laser projectors that Dolby uses for their theaters. So SMPTE and Dolby created HDR for home use.

Yes - Dolby helped create HDR10. But it is very limited when it comes to an HDR format. It is not a dynamic HDR format like Dolby Vision which can "grade" HDR on a frame-by-frame and scene-by-scene basis, something that HDR10, which is a static HDR format, can't do.

Adapting Dolby Vision for home use has not been an easy task. All the specs have to be down converted which leads to errors and such. Eventually it will be worked out. This is the problem with being an early adopter, especially when there is great pressure from the TV OEMS who want to sell the latest and greatest.

Hollywood has zero experience working with HDR other than those movies which will play in Dolby Theaters and Dolby is part of the production process when it comes to creating the end product (Digital Intermediate) which only Dolby will use in their theaters.

Of course it doesn't help that there are so many HDR formats with each being slightly different from the others.

Initially ATSC 3.0, the new broadcast format chose Hybrid Log Gamma as it's HDR format over the other formats. But now both Dolby Vision and HDR10+ are saying they too can be used, with modification, for ATSC 3.0. So instead of saying "sorry guys, you had your chance, we are sticking with HLG as our HDR format" ATSC 3.0 is now considering adding additional HDR formats. What this does is add time to the introduction of ATSC 3.0. Longer lead time means consumers have to wait.

I know that hindsight is always crystal clear but there are times when foresight and hindsight match. They are both crystal clear. I am referring to the introduction of High Definition to consumers. It was an industry wide effort with all parties on the same page. This was not the case for Ultra HD. It was and still is a "free-for-all" with no industry wide effort at all. The old expression of "too many cooks spoil the broth" applies. And who is suffering from this? Joe Consumer of course.
Thanks for the insight ,very helpful.
tvine2000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Go Back   High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource >
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:00 AM.



Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004 - 2018, MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands