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Disc Producers’ Work Grows

Bravestime
07-10-2009, 11:37 PM
According to data from The DVD Release Report, 2009 is on its way to being the fourth straight year of decline for total DVD releases, and data from Futuresource Consulting shows total DVD units released at retail down 10% this year from 2008.

With the slowdown in DVD, you’d think the producers of bonus content would be worried.

But thanks to an uptick in the number of Blu-ray Discs being released, the number of companies releasing them and the added work involved with Blu-ray, they’re working harder than ever. Paul Scott, EVP of Sony DADC, said at the recent Entertainment Supply Chain Academy conference that Blu-ray Disc sales are expected to be up 212% this year.

“The workload is unbelievable,” said Paulette Pantoja, CEO and founder of BluFocus, a Blu-ray production and quality control company. “The ramp-up is especially huge this summer because it’s not just the top tier-titles any more.”

Complete Article (http://www.homemediamagazine.com/dvd-producers/disc-producers-work-grows-16332)

DonnyDC
07-10-2009, 11:44 PM
Kennedy said that the coding for Blu-ray bonuses has become established, “whereas last year and the year before, people were still looking for feedback on what works, this year is more involved and creative.”

“If you wanted to do a trivia on a disc, you had to do it from scratch,” he explained. “Now that code is out there. The investment has already been made.”As expected producers are now using previous code as templates for new movies. I wonder how much Universal is saving by using that same crappy hud...

PFC5
07-11-2009, 05:15 AM
As expected producers are now using previous code as templates for new movies. I wonder how much Universal is saving by using that same crappy hud...

I agree I never liked the Universal menu setup. I like the menus coming up fro the bottom so at least it goes in the black bar area and not cutting off the left side of the movie when the menu is up. I also like to just hit the up arrow key and not have to hit the menu button to bring menus up. I which all studios stuck to some sort of standard method to bring up menus.

Kosty
07-11-2009, 07:23 AM
I kinda like it though on the side, as I often mask off the letterbars and it would also suck for CIH folks.

I don't think anyone has the magic touch yet. I don't mind the variety in the placement as long as the navigation is consistent.

Dare
07-11-2009, 12:43 PM
There's still the potential to add Blu-ray's features and interactivity to conventional DVDs. It's just a collection of files on the disc that Blu-ray players can understand, and once Blu-ray players become more common, it makes more and more sense for somebody to go ahead and do it. Regular DVD players would just ignore those files and go on their merry way with the old-fashioned menus.

Kosty
07-12-2009, 12:04 AM
Player memory and disc capability make that bit difficult and DVDs cannot run BD-J.

But some menus could be copied over.

Dare
07-12-2009, 10:41 AM
Why can't you put BD-J on a DVD?

The players run the BD-J, not the discs.

Kosty
07-12-2009, 04:06 PM
DVD players are not equipped or required to do that. Just like they cannot decode VC-1 or AVC or Dolby TrueHD or DTS-HD-Master Audio video or audio codecs.

Besides there just is not enough space on a 9GB dual layer DVD to store the stuff.

Kosty
07-12-2009, 04:08 PM
Why can't you put BD-J on a DVD?

The players run the BD-J, not the discs. Computers using BD-Roms could do that , but just hardware set top standalone DVD players don't have that capability burned into their SoC system on chip motherboards.

Blu-ray players are required to have that capability and memory and processing power to be able to do it.

Dare
07-12-2009, 04:26 PM
Computers using BD-Roms could do that , but just hardware set top standalone DVD players don't have that capability burned into their SoC system on chip motherboards.

Blu-ray players are required to have that capability and memory and processing power to be able to do it.

I'll have to quote my own post to respond to that. :D

There's still the potential to add Blu-ray's features and interactivity to conventional DVDs. It's just a collection of files on the disc that Blu-ray players can understand, and once Blu-ray players become more common, it makes more and more sense for somebody to go ahead and do it. Regular DVD players would just ignore those files and go on their merry way with the old-fashioned menus.

Blu-ray players would just need a firmware update to realize that there could be BD content on a DVD disc. But nobody would ever have to update the firmware on their Blu-ray players, would they? :D

Kosty
07-12-2009, 10:21 PM
Gotcha. I understand the concept of using a red laser DVD with Blu-ray menus.

But existing Blu-ray players already possess the ability to read DVD9s with Blu-ray content on them as Blu-ray Discs. Its in the Blu-ray spec already.

But DVD players could never do that and a regular DVD that authored to allow a DVD player to read it in MPEG 2 and DD or DTS and AACS encryption does not have the space on it for any fancy BD-J Bu-ray stuff.

Dare
07-13-2009, 12:31 AM
Gotcha. I understand the concept of using a red laser DVD with Blu-ray menus.

But existing Blu-ray players already possess the ability to read DVD9s with Blu-ray content on them as Blu-ray Discs. Its in the Blu-ray spec already.

Perfect!

But DVD players could never do that and a regular DVD that authored to allow a DVD player to read it in MPEG 2 and DD or DTS and AACS encryption does not have the space on it for any fancy BD-J Bu-ray stuff.

BD-J takes no disc space at all. Maybe a few kilobytes. It's only code. What takes up so much space is all that wonderful high definition video.

As far as the point about regular DVD players go, I'll have to quote my own post again.

There's still the potential to add Blu-ray's features and interactivity to conventional DVDs. It's just a collection of files on the disc that Blu-ray players can understand, and once Blu-ray players become more common, it makes more and more sense for somebody to go ahead and do it. Regular DVD players would just ignore those files and go on their merry way with the old-fashioned menus.

Nikopol
07-13-2009, 05:24 AM
Ling agreed, saying that the higher demand is offset by the feeling among some content owners that Blu-ray can be done on the same timeline and for the same price as DVD.

“Studios have gotten used to paying less money for DVD product, and they’re trying to translate that over to Blu-ray,” Pellerin said. “By its nature, Blu-ray needs more capital investment.”

In terms of quality control, a DVD takes a few hours. Making sure a Blu-ray goes out the door without major hiccups can take upwards of 100 hours. Blu-ray is less a video format than it is a software format, they noted.

“We see this increase continuing as more and more BD Live features are introduced,” BluFocus’ Pantoja said. “As with any new format, new technology requires more intense testing to ensure that everything is working properly. Blu-ray has the capability of using BD Java and this in turn allows for more innovative ideas to come to life.”

Many studios are getting most of their work done at major production facilities, such as Digital Deluxe Studios and New Wave Entertainment, Pellerin said, and doing so may run a risk with Blu-ray bonuses that didn’t exist with DVD.

“DVD content can be very generic,” Pellerin said. “Blu-ray isn’t cut-and-paste, rubberstamped product. All other sorts of opportunities have popped up. Blu-ray is the potential gateway to extend the lives of home video units because it starts to break away from the physical media and gets into the [electronic delivery].”


Oh man. BD 2.0, a feature not a lot of people care about, is eating up expensive man-hours. They should just scrap that cr4p and save the cost.... :rolleyes: