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Flexpay Disposable DVD Revived at Staples

anythingwt
06-02-2008, 12:00 PM
MAY 23 | Disposable DVDs are making a comeback.

Staples will begin selling disposable discs from Atlanta-based Flexplay Technologies in its 2,000 stores across the country beginning in mid-June.

Flexplay has deals with Warner Home Video, New Line Home Entertainment, Paramount Home Entertainment and DreamWorks to sell new release movies on its disposable discs, according to its Web site.

Flexplay time-limited discs play for 48 hours after they’ve been removed from their sealed packages, essentially making them disposable rental discs. Discs will be priced between $4 to $6.

This is Staples’ first foray into DVDs. Up to now the company has only sold blank discs.

Staples stores will carry 24-26 different newer release titles at a time in standalone displays at the front of its stores, spokeswoman Amy Shanler said.

“It’s an innovative technology, and it’s perfect for our small-business customer who’s trying to squeeze a lot of work into their extra busy lives,” she said. “They can also pick up something for fun or for an upcoming business trip.”

Flexplay has tried to build a market for its time-limited discs before, doing a trial in 2003 with Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment, which is noticeably absent this go-round.

Full Read (http://www.videobusiness.com/article/CA6563940.html?nid=3512)

$4 to $6 a piece? They're insane.

awol
06-02-2008, 12:23 PM
First of all, how on earth does a piece of plastic know if it's been removed from it's case or not? :what: :confused: :what:

railven
06-02-2008, 12:32 PM
First of all, how on earth does a piece of plastic know if it's been removed from it's case or not? :what: :confused: :what:

Rapid decomposure! Soon as it hits AIR it has 48hrs to live!

Haha, something to do with the dye I take it?

SOBAY310
06-02-2008, 12:33 PM
Doesn't this seem to be heading in the opposite direction of our "go green/eco friendly" society that we live in now?

anythingwt
06-02-2008, 12:37 PM
First of all, how on earth does a piece of plastic know if it's been removed from it's case or not? :what: :confused: :what:

Who knows. My guess is they put some chemical on the bottom of the discs that has a slow reaction with oxegyn that causes the disc to just rot away after its opened.

anythingwt
06-02-2008, 01:00 PM
Doesn't this seem to be heading in the opposite direction of our "go green/eco friendly" society that we live in now?

Yeah just a bit lol. I don't see it taking off. I remember it being almost introduced a while back, and never went anywhere. Especially at these prices its just pointless.

Lee Stewart
06-02-2008, 01:12 PM
Here is how the process works:

Flexplay DVDs use a proprietary, patented adhesive to glue the plastic disc halves together. Removing the Flexplay DVD from its sealed package exposes the disc to oxygen, triggering a gentle, controlled chemical reaction with the special Flexplay adhesive. After 48 hours – but not sooner – the adhesive begins to interfere with the DVD laser beam’s ability to read the disc. This all happens inside the disc, with no exposed chemicals or coatings.

www.flexplay.com

Dare
06-02-2008, 01:20 PM
6 bucks to rent a movie?

rbinck
06-02-2008, 01:28 PM
Sounds like a technology that has gone and never should have come.

kamspy
06-02-2008, 01:29 PM
Organic DivX:confused:

Farout777
06-02-2008, 01:29 PM
I guess it will last much longer if you watch it in a room devoid of oxygen, but watching the movie while doning a air suppling respirator won't be any fun.:haha:

Type A
06-02-2008, 07:41 PM
I wonder if you could spray the disk with a light coat of clear lacquer to prevent the reaction?

HD Goofnut
06-02-2008, 08:20 PM
Didn't Netflix dabble with these types of discs? I thought I remember Disney doing this with their DVD rentals through Netflix about 3-4 years ago.

BobY
06-03-2008, 11:44 AM
Lovely. Just what we need--more landfill.

Why does anyone think consumers want disposable cameras, disposable cell phones and now, disposable DVD's?

I have never seen a Staples that wasn't near a Best Buy or Video Rental store.

Lee Stewart
06-05-2008, 06:29 PM
Flexplay targets niche markets

Disposable discs available at truck stops, airports

By Jennifer Netherby -- Video Business, 6/5/2008
JUNE 5 | Staples isn’t the only store where consumers will be able to find Flexplay Entertainment’s disposable DVDs when the no-return discs make a comeback this month.

Atlanta-based Flexplay has been testing sales of the discs in truck stops across the country since last fall and is now rolling out to several thousand locations nationwide, said executive VP of marketing Joe Fuller.

Flexplay is selling discs in trucking chains Travel Centers of America and Luv’s Country Stores. Flexplay also has a deal with airport retailer Paradies, which is selling the discs at newsstands it operates at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and several other airport locations.

The push into Staples, announced a week ago, and travel stores plays into Flexplay’s new strategy of targeting the less frequent movie consumer.

“Portable rental product is just a natural for travelers,” Fuller said. At Staples, the company will target small-business owners and business travelers.

Flexplay’s time-limited discs play for 48 hours after they’ve been removed from their sealed packages, essentially making them disposable rental discs.

Flexplay has tried to build a market for its time-limited discs before, doing a trial in 2003 with Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment. Disney sold movies on the disposable discs, dubbed EZ-D, in 7-Eleven stores and through pizza chain Papa John’s in select cities for a year before giving up on the concept.

The reinvented Flexplay is hoping to lure the studio back and bring others on board.

A lot has changed since Flexplay first tried to sell disposable discs. In 2004, Flexplay Technologies (parent of Flexplay Entertainment) was bought by the Convex Group, which took the lessons from the failed 2003 trials and incorporated them into a new strategy for the company.

The company has dropped the price on its discs to $4-$6 and revamped its business model to go after non-renters rather than take on traditional DVD retailers.

Warner Home Video, New Line Home Entertainment, Paramount Home Entertainment and DreamWorks have signed licensing deals allowing Flexplay to sell disposable disc versions of select movies. In most cases, the studios aren’t releasing movies on Flexplay until a month or more after they’ve streeted on DVD, and the studios aren’t putting all their movies on Flexplay discs. Current new releases on Flexplay include There Will Be Blood, Rush Hour 3 and The Kite Runner.

Execs with the partner studios weren’t available or didn’t return calls about the deal.

Fuller said the delayed release won’t hurt Flexplay since it isn’t targeting regular movie renters, but is instead going after the “out-of-market customer that isn’t that engaged.”

“Even with a title that is a month or more old, there is a large base of customers that hasn’t seen the film and probably never will rent that movie,” he said.

Further differentiating the discs from standard DVD, Flexplay isn’t selling discs in stores that already carry DVD and is targeting alternative markets to reach these customers such as travel stops and convenience stores. The company also plans to sell its discs directly to consumers online at www.Flexplay.com.

Randy Parker, former CEO of disc distributor Entertainment Resource Inc., was brought in as CEO because of his experience in working with alternative DVD retailers. ERI specialized in servicing grocery and drug stores before closing in 2006.

At Staples and other retailers, Flexplay will handle distribution and manage the title selection with the retailer. The company has a deal with Barjam for distribution at truck stops. Retailers will sell 20-25 different titles at a time.

“Our goal is to offer consumers another way to consume more content more often,” Fuller said.

The company plans to begin testing a Blu-ray Disc version of Flexplay later this year with its replicator Cinram, but Fuller said the company will continue to watch the Blu-ray market for the right time to introduce it.
http://www.videobusiness.com/article/CA6567807.html

Cowboy X
06-05-2008, 08:58 PM
I would buy them and then burn them before they decompose.

This is however definitely not good news for landfills.

Dare
06-06-2008, 11:22 AM
Bah, DVDs are inert. Who cares if they fill up landfills? What's in them, polycarbonate and aluminum, and maybe some lacquer and ink? They'll just turn into ordinary mineral sediments in a few million years. Alien geologists will be digging up beds of "opticaldiscite" and making funny jewelry with it. ;)