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****Do I really need a1080p set

erict
05-31-2008, 11:59 AM
I have finally decided on a panny but Iím stuck at the dreaded 1080p/720p decision:eyecrazy :eyecrazy . The viewing area I will have will be 8 to 10 feet for movies, sports and general programming. So off I went to my local brick and mortar store to take a look. Well I stood about 8 feet back looking at the 50PZ80U AND 50PX80U which were next to each other and I couldnít tell the difference with my 40 year old eyes. Now before you tell me this is a no brainer I just want to make sure I wont be missing something if I donít get the 1080p set. Sears has the 50PX80U for $1300.00, which is a grand less:eek: , then the 50PZ80U. If there is an advantage to get the 1080p version I would like to here why. How does blue ray look on a 720p set?

rbinck
05-31-2008, 12:29 PM
I'd say if all you are ever going to do is to watch TV on the set, save the money.

If there is even the slightest chance you will play games or attach a computer, then you might consider the 1080p version.

Shark2k
05-31-2008, 12:46 PM
I'd say if all you are ever going to do is to watch TV on the set, save the money.

If there is even the slightest chance you will play games or attach a computer, then you might consider the 1080p version.

I would have to agree with rbinck. With 1080p, you really don't see the difference until you get greater than 60-70 inches (projector screen size) and even then some people might not notice the difference. During my college years (hehe, I actually just graduated, so I found that funny :p), and this was actually the last 3 semesters, my roommate had a projector that was capable of up to 1080i. I started downloading HD movies (a few in 1080p) I was just barely able to tell the difference between the 720 vs 1080 version (I downloaded both versions of certain movies just in case my roommates computer couldn't handle the 1080). That being said, I was able to tell a difference though, as the 1080 versions looked much clearer and sharper than the 720 version. And so you know, the size of the screen was a 125" 4:3 picture and about ~108" 16:9 picture (this was for 1.78:1, the screen was a little smaller for 2.39 and above ratios).

So since you can't really see the difference, I would have to say save the thousand bucks and get the 720p version. (You could even send me that money as a graduation gift ;))

-Shark2k

rbinck
05-31-2008, 01:17 PM
I don't agree with the statement you can't see the difference. I would rather say you won't notice the difference.

Let me explain the difference. Take any 1920x1080 display and use a computer to put up a web page in 1920x1080 (1080p) resolution and the same web page in 1280x720 (720p) resolution and you will "see" a difference. The clarity of the 1080p vs the 720p will depend on the seating distance and the screen size, but you will see a difference. Now that will definitely give you a benchmark that clearly will show there is a difference that can be seen.

Now put up a photo in the two resolutions and most likely at normal seating distances, you will not "notice" a difference in the two photos. This will be true whether you use the same display or a 1080p and a 720p display viewing them one after another. Viewing side by side, however many people will notice a slight difference, but that could be placebo.

mshulman
05-31-2008, 01:22 PM
I'll offer a different perspective.

How long do you plan on keeping the TV? My HD Projector replaced a TV (still being used in secondary area) that was my primary TV for about 8 years or more.

4 years from now, might you regret not having 1080P? If you do, would you then want to spend the money on another TV?

Jim Bob Jones
05-31-2008, 03:28 PM
First of all, no one in this or any other forum can tell you whether you will see a difference. Whether you intend to play games or hook the set to a computer should not be your sole criteria in choosing 1080p over 720p. There are also high definition sources such as Blu-ray and (the apparently defunct) HD DVD. 1080p gives you some growing room as the technology continues to develop. I would say, if you can reasonably afford to pay the difference, go for the 1080p set.

Jim Bob Jones
05-31-2008, 03:30 PM
In other words, follow the advice of MShulman. I find that he is usually right on the money and on the technology.

Shark2k
05-31-2008, 03:46 PM
In other words, follow the advice of MShulman. I find that he is usually right on the money and on the technology.

But if you can't notice the difference between 720p and 1080p now, than you won't be able to notice the difference in 4 years. And the TC already mentioned he can't tell the difference, nobody on this forum is telling him he won't notice a difference. It's already fact. Whether or not there is more content available in 1080p in 4 years then, does not really matter. Since it is the TCs TV and not the people that will visit and watch HD content (who might be able to notice the difference) it should be based upon his preference. So, since the TC has said that he cannot notice the difference between 720p and 1080p, than there really is no reason for him to get the more expensive TV.

While more people might say 1080p is "TrueHD" the fact remains that 720p is also technically "TrueHD", it's just not the highest resolution you can go right now. Other than the better resolution you get from 1080p, as far as I'm concerned (and I know, correct me if I'm wrong though) there really is not a benefit of 1080p over 720p. Which means that in 4 years from now, unless the TC can notice the difference between 720p and 1080p, it really wouldn't matter that he bought the 720p version.

And on different note and just out of curiosity, rbinck was this statement "I don't agree with the statement you can't see the difference. I would rather say you won't notice the difference." just a general statement or directed to me. (I guess I'm paranoid for no reason and think you were talking to me :p)

-Shark2k

rbinck
05-31-2008, 04:05 PM
Just a general statement to clarify your implication that I think you can not see a difference. I might add that when people view a photo or video, the brain will fill in some missing detail. That is why on a SD set the picture will actually be perceived as better than on the same sized HD set. On the SD set, the detail is added by the brain whereas on the HD set the detail is added by a processor. Your brain is much better than a processor. Same with video on a 720p set vs a 1080p set.

EddieDZ
05-31-2008, 04:46 PM
go big or go home... go with the full 1080p, might as well. in a year or two from now you'll say to yourself "damn, i should have just brought the 1080p set"

killer scott
05-31-2008, 06:23 PM
The brick and mortar store you went to probably was running a 1080i source on both TV's. You may not have seen the full potential of that 1080P set. You should see if you can see it with a BR player plugged in.

johnnytuinals
05-31-2008, 06:23 PM
I'll offer a different perspective.

How long do you plan on keeping the TV? My HD Projector replaced a TV (still being used in secondary area) that was my primary TV for about 8 years or more.

4 years from now, might you regret not having 1080P? If you do, would you then want to spend the money on another TV?



You are sooo very wrong..........
The guy wants to watch the Plasma just for HD Cable or HD Satellite only
and I would think maybe he will use it every now and then to watch a dvd.......
I would go and get a 50 inch Panasonic Plasma for around the $1100-$1200 mark.....
First off he will not see ANY diffence in the Picture since there will not be anything broadcast in 1080P in the next 10 years at least.....
And at that time.
I am sure he will be able to buy a 110 inch plasma 1080P for under $2000 at that time......
So now if you watch LOTS of bluerays and play lots of video games,Then I would say get a 1080P.
But I think you should be happy with a $1000 brand name plasma.
There will not be any 1080P Broadcast for many years to come,and I am sure you will see little to no diffence at alllllllllll......Jt

iserum
05-31-2008, 07:18 PM
for viewing distance of 10 feet 720p will be a wiser choice for following reasons,

1) Broadcast is 720p and 1080i only, (native resolution of 720P sets)
2) for Bluray movies if interlacing is done on set correctly there is no difference in PQ between 1080p and 1080i.

There is one issue though most of the 1080p sets have all the advanced features because manufacturers will get more money for 1080p sets, 720P sets will be considered as bargain sets in near future with less features, manufacturers will do 1080p for sizes 37 and up and put more advanced features in these sets.

Home theater Magazine did a very interesting test between tvs from every technology RP, LCD and Plasma, in their test Pioneer 720P plasma beats all other 1080P sets, Pioneer processing of pictures were far better than any 1080P sets compared. I would pick a Pioneer Kuro 720 plasma over any 1080p LCD.

erict
05-31-2008, 07:22 PM
A computer or games will never be hooked up to this panel, but I will be buying a blue ray down the road;)

Shark2k
05-31-2008, 07:34 PM
A computer or games will never be hooked up to this panel, but I will be buying a blue ray down the road;)

What I suggest you do is A) go back to the store and see if they can put in a Blu-ray movie and play it at 1080p on one set and 720p on another set. The same movie, at more or less the same spot in the movie so you can see if you actually notice a difference between 720p or 1080p. If you do not notice a difference I would go with the 720p set. If you notice a difference and it's not all that big of a deal to you, again go with the 720p. If you notice a difference and it is a big deal to you (wow, that really looks clearer and sharper in 1080p, I like that much better, type of thing) than go with the 1080p set.

B) if A is not feasible (the store does not have two of the same movies to show, only one TV is hooked up to Blu-ray or whatever) then you could try something else (which would be a little more difficult). This would be, finding two of your friends that have the same Blu-ray movie (and consequently have a Blu-ray player) and hopefully a friend that has a 1080p TV. Then you see if your friends will let you borrow the players and movies, hook them up to two different (I would keep them the same type though for testing) inputs (i.e. two HDMI or two Component). Put the movies into the players and go through different scenes and than switch back and forth between the two inputs and see if you notice a difference. From there, the same decisions would be used as in option A.

That's my 2 cents on the whole ordeal. From what I've read and know, a 50" will probably still be difficult to notice the enhancements of 1080p. But, I would strongly recommend trying to do A (as it is the easiest on your part and you don't have to trouble friends).

-Shark2k

killer scott
05-31-2008, 08:02 PM
for viewing distance of 10 feet 720p will be a wiser choice for following reasons,

1) Broadcast is 720p and 1080i only, (native resolution of 720P sets)
2) for Bluray movies if interlacing is done on set correctly there is no difference in PQ between 1080p and 1080i.

There is one issue though most of the 1080p sets have all the advanced features because manufacturers will get more money for 1080p sets, 720P sets will be considered as bargain sets in near future with less features, manufacturers will do 1080p for sizes 37 and up and put more advanced features in these sets.

Home theater Magazine did a very interesting test between tvs from every technology RP, LCD and Plasma, in their test Pioneer 720P plasma beats all other 1080P sets, Pioneer processing of pictures were far better than any 1080P sets compared. I would pick a Pioneer Kuro 720 plasma over any 1080p LCD.

agreed

johnnytuinals
05-31-2008, 08:58 PM
Answer is ,,,,,
If you are going to watch lots of Bluerays
Then go with a 1080P.
If you are going to watch mostly Hd cable or Hd Satellite programing.
Then I would go with the cheaper plasmas....
Any other questions you might have,,,go spend your money on a 1080P.
You are only wasting our time.....
LAST TIME
You will not see 1080P HD broadcast programing for many years to come...
By that time you will be able to upgrade to a 100 Inch Plus 1080P inch plasma for under $2000.00......
Think I am wrong,,,,,
Why waste your money now when there is no 1080P broadcasting television programs?????
Geeeeee you really think that you are getting a better picture with a 1080P Plasma,,when all the cable and satellite are only giving you 720P and 1080I ONLY for the next 10 years??????

jkkyler
05-31-2008, 09:54 PM
Johhnytuinals - there is both 720 and 1080 programming available and if your 1080p set deinterlaces 1080i properly ther is no- I repeat no difference visually between that and a 1080p source. To the original poster let your eyes and wallet be your judge but I do agree that a lot of the nicer features and better chipsets/scalers/processors are often used in 1080 sets as these are higher end cost items. I say Good 720p over poor 1080 set but I went to HH gregg over mem day and once since and they are willing to give me the Panny 46" (I believe pz80u ) for $1399.

erict
05-31-2008, 09:57 PM
Answer is ,,,,,
If you are going to watch lots of Bluerays
Then go with a 1080P.
If you are going to watch mostly Hd cable or Hd Satellite programing.
Then I would go with the cheaper plasmas....
Any other questions you might have,,,go spend your money on a 1080P.
You are only wasting our time.....
LAST TIME
You will not see 1080P HD broadcast programing for many years to come...
By that time you will be able to upgrade to a 100 Inch Plus 1080P inch plasma for under $2000.00......
Think I am wrong,,,,,
Why waste your money now when there is no 1080P broadcasting television programs?????
Geeeeee you really think that you are getting a better picture with a 1080P Plasma,,when all the cable and satellite are only giving you 720P and 1080I ONLY for the next 10 years??????

So I'm wasting your time:huh :huh

PFC5
06-01-2008, 05:03 AM
I have finally decided on a panny but Iím stuck at the dreaded 1080p/720p decision:eyecrazy :eyecrazy . The viewing area I will have will be 8 to 10 feet for movies, sports and general programming. So off I went to my local brick and mortar store to take a look. Well I stood about 8 feet back looking at the 50PZ80U AND 50PX80U which were next to each other and I couldnít tell the difference with my 40 year old eyes. Now before you tell me this is a no brainer I just want to make sure I wont be missing something if I donít get the 1080p set. Sears has the 50PX80U for $1300.00, which is a grand less:eek: , then the 50PZ80U. If there is an advantage to get the 1080p version I would like to here why. How does blue ray look on a 720p set?

I just price matched the Sear ad from last week that ended on 5/27/08 to get the TH-50PZ80U for that $1,299.00 price. It is an excellent display and I am sure you will love it if you get this one.

It depends on viewing distance and your eyesight at that distance as to whether it is worth it to spend the extra money for the 1080p version. It sounds like you will not see much of a difference based on your post, so you may be better off saving the money with the PX model at 768p (which IS a great deal at $1300.00 IMO).

Just so you know though, Best Buy has the 1080p 50PZ80U model for $230.00 lower this week I think, but that might have ended on 5/31/08. I live for the "deal" myself and although I wasn't looking to replace my fantastic 720p 50" DLP, I bought the 50PZ80U BECAUSE I got such a great deal.

Don't be in such a hurry and just wait for the deals to come is my best advice. I doubt you will find a deal anytime soon like the deal I got, because they are extremely rare, and might have only come from a misprint in the Sears ad if the rumor is true. Also remember that you CAN negotiate to close the deal with a salesman at these stores. You just have to be willing to negotiate hard and walk away if they do not give you a reasonable deal (in your opinion).

Hope this helps!

mshulman
06-01-2008, 07:07 AM
You are sooo very wrong..........
The guy wants to watch the Plasma just for HD Cable or HD Satellite only
and I would think maybe he will use it every now and then to watch a dvd.......
I would go and get a 50 inch Panasonic Plasma for around the $1100-$1200 mark.....
First off he will not see ANY diffence in the Picture since there will not be anything broadcast in 1080P in the next 10 years at least.....
And at that time.
I am sure he will be able to buy a 110 inch plasma 1080P for under $2000 at that time......
So now if you watch LOTS of bluerays and play lots of video games,Then I would say get a 1080P.
But I think you should be happy with a $1000 brand name plasma.
There will not be any 1080P Broadcast for many years to come,and I am sure you will see little to no diffence at alllllllllll......Jt

How am I SOOOO wrong?

This is his immediate need. Who knows what he might think in a year, 2 years, 4 years..etc. I simply pointed out that if he plans on keeping the TV for many years (as most people do), he might regret not having 1080P later. Maybe he doesn't watch many movies now, but maybe he will later?

Scottnot
06-01-2008, 09:06 AM
johnnytuinals has made it clear over and over again that he does not understand the difference between
input signal format and display resolution; nor does he understand the difference between upscaling/downscaling and deinterlacing.

His lack of proper knowledge and understanding has caused him to muck up any number of threads since he joined, and even though many have gone to great lengths to explain these issues to him, he either doesn't get it or doesn't want to get it . . . there are such unfortunates.

pasta
06-01-2008, 06:01 PM
I own a home theater store and I see TVs side-by-side all day long. In my opinion there are 2 important answers. First, everyone sees things differently. So it's a tough question to ask of someone. I've witnessed 2 people watching the same set in my store describe very different perspectives on the picture. Secondly, you will NOT see the value in a 1080P set under 50". That's where I believe the value begins based on the testing I do in my store. But only slightly at that size. If price is that much of a consideration I would save the money.

johnnytuinals
06-01-2008, 06:12 PM
Pasta is very right you will see little or no difference
and Scottnot can go back to work at Bestbuy in the
returns department

06-02-2008, 02:27 PM
I think it depends on the size of your set, and if you like watching a lot of blu-ray movies and stuff like that you should definitely get a 1080p. But if it's just watching tv and regular dvds, 720p is more than enough. Also, a lot of 1080p's are dropping prices to make room for now another new feature 120hz.. So if you really want to get a 1080p then I suggest you wait until Christmas.

Waidesworld
06-02-2008, 02:53 PM
Isn't it at forty that the eyes start acting up? Go with what you feel. it's like a torquoise car is green to some people and a bluish to others. Light and color perception is different to every one. I sell lamps of all types and trying to tell someone about color temperatures over the phone is a joke. So go with what you feel yourself. I did like that comment to ask the B&M store about their feed before deciding.

Shark2k
06-02-2008, 03:10 PM
I agree with pasta, it's basically what I have been saying. People that keep saying "...it depends on if you are just watching TV/DVDs or if you are watching Blu-ray movie," are wrong. If the TC cannot notice the difference between 720p and 1080p, there is no reason for the TC to get a 1080p TV if he is does not notice the difference.

@Waidesworld, I'm pretty sure the comment about the B&M is referring to what I said. I actually got that idea from reading various reviews about TVs and I think from other forums, I can't quite remember where I heard it. But I do know that it was not strictly my idea. I do think it is a good idea though, because when I read it, they would say to bring a DVD that you are familiar with so that you know if the TV looks good or if the sound system looks good (it works for both buying TVs and speakers).

Anyway, TC let us know what you decided when you decide (I know I'm curious, not sure about others.)

-Shark2k

Gameboy_J
06-10-2008, 10:30 AM
Hey guys, I just joined to ask a few questions of my own and there seem to be some knowledgeable people in this thread so here goes...

I am looking to upgrade my current Olevia 27" LCD (3 years old, not one single problem besides being too small). I am reading a lot of good things about the TH-42PX80U and it is about $1000 at circuit city and $900 at sears. I think I have decided on Plasma over LCD, from what I have been reading it seems to be a great technology and offers up richer colors/deeper blacks at a more affordable price than LCD's.

I have a Toshiba HD-A2 as well as xbox add on to watch my collection of HD-DVD's and I plan to buy a PS3 to play as well as to start my collection on BR movies. I watch mostly SD directv channels, but also love watching movies (both SD and HD). I play video games on occasion. I sit about 7-10 feet from my tv. I don't personally feel that I need to spend more money on the 1080p version. From what I have read, it seems as though the 720p will work just fine. After all I have been satisfied with my 720p Olevia LCD. I think it looks amazing when watching my Planet Earth Series. It looks a little less amazing when watching some scenes in Transformers, but overall I have been happy.

Do you guys think I will need the 1080p? Should I pony up now so as not to be disappointed later? Or if I am happy now with my 720 will I still be happy with it in a 42" version?

Thank you all so much! I need advice from people who actually have a passion for this kind of stuff, not just making commission. :thumbsup:

s2mikey
06-10-2008, 01:30 PM
The 1080p Hype-Machine has caused more problem threads on AV forums than any other "machine" in recent history. I blame this on the B&M stores ramming overpriced, underperforming 1080p sets down consumers throats. To bad, really. NOT good for the hobby, IMO.

Meanwhile...back in REALITY-land: Picture quality is made up of several characteristics. ONE of those characteristics is resolution. The other and arguably MORE important ones are: Real Contrast, black-levels, video processing, and color accuracy. Knowlegable people understand that the TV can have 8,000 lines of resolution, but if it has bad contrast or crappy video processing then it will still SUCK. Resolution cant save a bad TV.

That being said, if you can get 1080p with all of the other image quality characteristics I mentioned, then great...go for it! Otherwise, like someone else mentioned, the "lowly" 768p Pioneer plasma crushed a bunch of 1080p LCDs in a recent Home Theater Mag TV shootout. Why? How could that be? Didnt the 1080p beat the crap out of the "lowly" 768p plasma? Guess not. :banana:

:2cents

Gameboy_J
06-10-2008, 02:32 PM
The 1080p Hype-Machine has caused more problem threads on AV forums than any other "machine" in recent history. I blame this on the B&M stores ramming overpriced, underperforming 1080p sets down consumers throats. To bad, really. NOT good for the hobby, IMO.

Meanwhile...back in REALITY-land: Picture quality is made up of several characteristics. ONE of those characteristics is resolution. The other and arguably MORE important ones are: Real Contrast, black-levels, video processing, and color accuracy. Knowlegable people understand that the TV can have 8,000 lines of resolution, but if it has bad contrast or crappy video processing then it will still SUCK. Resolution cant save a bad TV.

That being said, if you can get 1080p with all of the other image quality characteristics I mentioned, then great...go for it! Otherwise, like someone else mentioned, the "lowly" 768p Pioneer plasma crushed a bunch of 1080p LCDs in a recent Home Theater Mag TV shootout. Why? How could that be? Didnt the 1080p beat the crap out of the "lowly" 768p plasma? Guess not. :banana:

:2cents

I appreciate the response, but I am asking your opinion based on the things that I explained that I would be using the tv for. I am looking at the TH-42PX80U right now, but I am curious as to whether or not I should ante up and get the 1080p version. Is there any practical reason as to why I would need the extra lines of pixels? I think the 768 resolution would be enough for my needs, but I wanted to get a general consensus on the matter before spending the 1,000 bucks. Thanks!

Parasound
06-10-2008, 10:30 PM
One other point. In brick and mortar stores they usually use a 720p source for general viewing. As a result you would not see a difference between 720 and 1080. Rest assured, I see a difference between 1080i and 1080p and I am over 60!!!!!!

Scottnot
06-10-2008, 10:51 PM
Rest assured, I see a difference between 1080i and 1080p and I am over 60!!!!!!
If that is true, then there is something wrong with your set, because there is no difference between 1080i and 1080p unless the deinterlacer is screwing up really bad.
One other possibility, of course, might be if you are comparing a Hitachi ALIS display with a conventional 1080p display, but even then . . . .

soupnazi
06-11-2008, 01:17 AM
A 42" 720p TV might have a very slight difference compared side by side with a 42" 1080p
But, You will Not be watching both of these TVs side by side at home.
It's all in you're own perception.
I think the TH42PX80 has a great picture.
And basically for the same cost as the 1080p I can also buy a blu-ray player to watch on my 720p

hoorta
06-11-2008, 01:22 AM
Hey guys, I just joined to ask a few questions of my own and there seem to be some knowledgeable people in this thread so here goes...

I am looking to upgrade my current Olevia 27" LCD (3 years old, not one single problem besides being too small). I am reading a lot of good things about the TH-42PX80U and it is about $1000 at circuit city and $900 at sears. I think I have decided on Plasma over LCD, from what I have been reading it seems to be a great technology and offers up richer colors/deeper blacks at a more affordable price than LCD's.

I have a Toshiba HD-A2 as well as xbox add on to watch my collection of HD-DVD's and I plan to buy a PS3 to play as well as to start my collection on BR movies. I watch mostly SD directv channels, but also love watching movies (both SD and HD). I play video games on occasion. I sit about 7-10 feet from my tv. I don't personally feel that I need to spend more money on the 1080p version. From what I have read, it seems as though the 720p will work just fine. After all I have been satisfied with my 720p Olevia LCD. I think it looks amazing when watching my Planet Earth Series. It looks a little less amazing when watching some scenes in Transformers, but overall I have been happy.

Do you guys think I will need the 1080p? Should I pony up now so as not to be disappointed later? Or if I am happy now with my 720 will I still be happy with it in a 42" version?

Thank you all so much! I need advice from people who actually have a passion for this kind of stuff, not just making commission. :thumbsup:


I'll second Pasta's opinion. Unless you're rolling in moolah, it doesn't make a lot of sense to go 1080p at anything less than 50". FWIW, I consider myself a darn critical viewer and I went 720p for the new 37" set in the bedroom, and I think I must have checked out about every set in that size range. The extra $500 just wasn't worth it to go 1080p. BTW, BR looked pretty stunning down converted to 720p on a 42" Pioneer Kuro when I saw it demoed. & my :2cents plasma looks more "natural" than lcd. OTOH, when I replace the main set (55" class) in the primary HT room, you're darn right it's going to be 1080p.

s2mikey
06-11-2008, 11:32 AM
I appreciate the response, but I am asking your opinion based on the things that I explained that I would be using the tv for. I am looking at the TH-42PX80U right now, but I am curious as to whether or not I should ante up and get the 1080p version. Is there any practical reason as to why I would need the extra lines of pixels? I think the 768 resolution would be enough for my needs, but I wanted to get a general consensus on the matter before spending the 1,000 bucks. Thanks!

I would not spend the money for the 1080p. $1000 is WAY too much for what wont end up being any performance increase. And, 42 inches is even MORE reason to not overpay for 1080p.

Stick with the TH-42PX80U, it will be a great plasma! :thumbsup:

glennb1
06-13-2008, 09:31 AM
A 42" 720p TV might have a very slight difference compared side by side with a 42" 1080p


Since when ??
WTF ?

That might be true if you are comparing 720p to 1080i.

soupnazi
06-13-2008, 12:07 PM
since the human eye can not discern the difference when the picture is compressed on a 42" screen and you are sitting more than 6 feet away from the screen.

do you understand the point I was trying to make?
maybe it is a "better" picture but it is a more expensive picture and 42" 720p is pretty darn good.

pappylap
06-13-2008, 12:13 PM
For anyone wishing to argue about or weigh the advantages vs the disadvantages of 720p/1080i vs true 1080p I submit this link to this thread with an abundance of facts, figures, & opinions on the subject very informative and enlightening....

http://www.highdefforum.com/showthread.php?t=51077

glennb1
06-13-2008, 12:46 PM
do you understand the point I was trying to make?

I guess not.

Geez.

Sorry.

Chill out.

jedi4141
06-13-2008, 07:08 PM
I have finally decided on a panny but Iím stuck at the dreaded 1080p/720p decision:eyecrazy :eyecrazy . The viewing area I will have will be 8 to 10 feet for movies, sports and general programming. So off I went to my local brick and mortar store to take a look. Well I stood about 8 feet back looking at the 50PZ80U AND 50PX80U which were next to each other and I couldnít tell the difference with my 40 year old eyes. Now before you tell me this is a no brainer I just want to make sure I wont be missing something if I donít get the 1080p set. Sears has the 50PX80U for $1300.00, which is a grand less:eek: , then the 50PZ80U. If there is an advantage to get the 1080p version I would like to here why. How does blue ray look on a 720p set?

You will be extremely happy with the 720p. I have one and its great. If you do go 1080p, Costco had a (not sure the model #) 1080p Panny plasma for $1999 not too long ago. Comes with a 2 year warranty.

soupnazi
06-13-2008, 11:13 PM
I guess not.

Geez.

Sorry.

Chill out.

didn't mean to offend anyone.
I guess I just reacted to you cursing at me with an acronym. WTF?

glennb1
06-16-2008, 11:26 AM
didn't mean to offend anyone.
I guess I just reacted to you cursing at me with an acronym. WTF?

It's OK.

No BFD.

WayneNumm
10-15-2008, 01:56 PM
Awesome thread - lots of good opinions/info here! The 720p versus 1080p debate is is the last thing I am resolving before getting the Panasonic TH42PX80 (720p).

In case anyone hasn't seen the below review (I'm too new, and can't post the actual link yet), it adds to my sense that 720p would satisfy my TV/DVD/bluray needs quite nicely for a few years to come at least:
h**p://w*w.hdtvtest.co.uk/Panasonic-TH42PX80/Picture-Quality/

And the truth is that the only reason I am even considering a HD tv right now is because the prices have become so affordable for the 720p sets. The comparably sized 1080p sets are just more than I am willing to pay at the moment.