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Moving with Dish - new TVs

tortooga
03-12-2008, 09:12 AM
I called Dish to find out about this, but thought I would see if any of you have had experience with my issues and what you would recommend doing. I am moving and have had my service on "dish pause" where they charge like $10. / month until I get into my new house.

I have 2 new TV's though and would like to know what my best setup option would be. I have 3 HD tv's and would like to get HD on at least 2 of them. Ideally - one HD in basement w/ DVR, one HD in family room w/ DVR. Then sd tv's upstairs (bedrooms)... I would like to have DVR on at least the master br upstairs. So, would this work?

622 (i have currently) in family room w/ 2nd tv to bedroom 1.

Then get a 722 in basement and have 2nd tv in bedroom 2.

Would that work? Would I have DVR on all tv's then? Anybody know what that would cost me a month?

Also - does anybody know if the "standard" install that they will provide can be on a pole in the yard? New home won't allow a dish mounted on house.

Thanks!

fredinva
03-12-2008, 03:11 PM
Hogwash on that last statement!!!
The FCC says you can, if you own it.

fred

jpfrasier
03-12-2008, 03:59 PM
Also - does anybody know if the "standard" install that they will provide can be on a pole in the yard? New home won't allow a dish mounted on house.

Thanks!

Hogwash on that last statement!!!
The FCC says you can, if you own it.

fred

Are you sure? Could the homeowner's association have enough power to make such a declaration or is that what you are referring to when you say the FCC says you can? Has there been a court case ruling in a homeowner's association situation?

Loves2Watch
03-12-2008, 09:38 PM
Read the attached link. No homeowners association can prevent you from putting up a dish or antenna.
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION



FCC INFORMATION SHEET
December 2007
Over-the-Air Reception Devices Rule

Preemption of Restrictions on Placement of Direct Broadcast Satellite, Broadband Radio Service, and Television Broadcast Antennas

Quick Links to Document Sections Below

* Questions and Answers
* Links to Relevant Orders and the Rule
* Guidance on Filing a Petition Where to Call for More Information

As directed by Congress in Section 207 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the Federal Communications Commission adopted the Over-the-Air Reception Devices (“OTARD”) rule concerning governmental and nongovernmental restrictions on viewers' ability to receive video programming signals from direct broadcast satellites ("DBS"), broadband radio service providers (formerly multichannel multipoint distribution service or MMDS), and television broadcast stations ("TVBS").

The rule (47 C.F.R. Section 1.4000) has been in effect since October 1996, and it prohibits restrictions that impair the installation, maintenance or use of antennas used to receive video programming. The rule applies to video antennas including direct-to-home satellite dishes that are less than one meter (39.37") in diameter (or of any size in Alaska), TV antennas, and wireless cable antennas. The rule prohibits most restrictions that: (1) unreasonably delay or prevent installation, maintenance or use; (2) unreasonably increase the cost of installation, maintenance or use; or (3) preclude reception of an acceptable quality signal.

Effective January 22, 1999, the Commission amended the rule so that it also applies to rental property where the renter has an exclusive use area, such as a balcony or patio.

On October 25, 2000, the Commission further amended the rule so that it applies to customer-end antennas that receive and transmit fixed wireless signals. This amendment became effective on May 25, 2001.

The rule applies to individuals who place antennas that meet size limitations on property that they own or rent and that is within their exclusive use or control, including condominium owners and cooperative owners, and tenants who have an area where they have exclusive use, such as a balcony or patio, in which to install the antenna. The rule applies to townhomes and manufactured homes, as well as to single family homes.

The rule allows local governments, community associations and landlords to enforce restrictions that do not impair the installation, maintenance or use of the types of antennas described above, as well as restrictions needed for safety or historic preservation. Under some circumstances where a central or common antenna is available, a community association or landlord may restrict the installation of individual antennas. The rule does not apply to common areas that are owned by a landlord, a community association, or jointly by condominium or cooperative owners where the antenna user does not have an exclusive use area. Such common areas may include the roof or exterior wall of a multiple dwelling unit. Therefore, restrictions on antennas installed in or on such common areas are enforceable.

This Information Sheet provides general answers to questions concerning implementation of the rule, but is not a substitute for the actual rule. For further information or a copy of the rule, contact the Federal Communications Commission at 888-CALLFCC (toll free) or (202) 418-7096. The rule is also available via the Internet by going to links to relevant Orders and the rule.

http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

tortooga
03-13-2008, 07:33 AM
I was looking at this link:
dishnetwork . com/downloads/pdf/LLP_Release_Form.pdf

Where it says: Landlords or Homeowners Associations
may prohibit placement on:
1 Common areas
2 Rooftops
3 Outside walls
4 Window sills
(Unless permission is granted from

So I was assuming "outside" walls.
The homeowners assoc. says "cannot be in public view" but I think that if I put it on the house, I would have the FCC behind me. :-)

Loves2Watch
03-13-2008, 08:14 AM
Correct, if you own your property (and even if you rent), the FCC rules are on your side.

VictorB
03-13-2008, 01:40 PM
Correct, if you own your property (and even if you rent), the FCC rules are on your side.

I would disagree with this comment...at least with respect to my Homeowners Association in California. The CC&R's (convenents, conditions and restrictions) dictate that the HOA can set guidelines for installation of Dishes - mine even asked for an "architectural change request" before the board before I could install the dish.

One of the reasons I rent it out now instead of living in it.:eyecrazy

jpfrasier
03-13-2008, 04:29 PM
One may have the legal standing to do so, but I guess it becomes a question of how motivated and willing are you to fight the good fight. It's a pain in the butt to do battle with the homeowner's association, even though you maybe justified and correct in doing so.

deadhead68
03-13-2008, 04:46 PM
One may have the legal standing to do so, but I guess it becomes a question of how motivated and willing are you to fight the good fight. It's a pain in the butt to do battle with the homeowner's association, even though you maybe justified and correct in doing so.

Actually I quite enjoyed it. My HOA was giving me a hard time about the "big ugly" OTA antenna on my roof. They even had their lawyers send me a letter stating I was racking up a $25 a day penalty for having it up. I faxed the above mentioned FCC guidelines to the HOA lawyers and 2 days later I received a registered letter appologizing for the threatening letters and they stopped. Just for fun, I printed up copies for the neighborhood and put them in people's mailboxes. Next thing you know, I've got people coming by thanking me and some bringing me a case of beer for the effort. About a month later half the neighborhood was enjoying their FREE HD.

DeadHead68

jpfrasier
03-13-2008, 06:12 PM
Actually I quite enjoyed it. My HOA was giving me a hard time about the "big ugly" OTA antenna on my roof. They even had their lawyers send me a letter stating I was racking up a $25 a day penalty for having it up. I faxed the above mentioned FCC guidelines to the HOA lawyers and 2 days later I received a registered letter appologizing for the threatening letters and they stopped. Just for fun, I printed up copies for the neighborhood and put them in people's mailboxes. Next thing you know, I've got people coming by thanking me and some bringing me a case of beer for the effort. About a month later half the neighborhood was enjoying their FREE HD.

DeadHead68


That's awesome! I never imagined it could be so easy and I'm glad it worked out for you and your neighbors. I'm fortunate I don't have a homeowner's association to contend with but it's good to know if I ever do, it doesn't have to be a difficult process.

Michial
03-13-2008, 09:52 PM
I own a townhouse in Seattle with an association. I assume since I own it I can mount the dish up high on my exterior wall so I can get a clear line of sight. I bought this townhouse for 270k-so I should be able to stick half a dozen bolts into my townhouse without some wankers telling me I cant. What are my rights according to the law.

jim5506
03-14-2008, 07:21 AM
Be careful about putting things in mailboxes. that is a violation of federal law. The mailbox is the property of the US Postal Service, even if you bought it yourself. Only US Mail can be placed in your mailbox.

jim5506
03-14-2008, 07:23 AM
I own a townhouse in Seattle with an association. I assume since I own it I can mount the dish up high on my exterior wall so I can get a clear line of sight. I bought this townhouse for 270k-so I should be able to stick half a dozen bolts into my townhouse without some wankers telling me I cant. What are my rights according to the law.

You can mount it where ever you need to for reception. If it is unobtrusive that is best, but if it MUST be in the middle of your front lawn to get reception and that is an exclusive use area, you may put it there.

VictorB
04-15-2008, 03:17 PM
I own a townhouse in Seattle with an association. I assume since I own it I can mount the dish up high on my exterior wall so I can get a clear line of sight. .

See my comment previously. Check your CC&R's about external antennas - hope you are not restricted but better to be safe than to be sued!