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I am livid! Drywallers nicked my 75' Component Cable!

boxturtle
01-25-2008, 08:28 PM
Help me keep my sanitity!

New construction. I've run a 75' component cable to the far corner of a new room (game room/pool table, etc.)

I went to GREAT LENGTHS to run this baby up through the rafters, tie it down every 5 or 6 feet.

So what just happened? I went to check on how the drywall guys did and ABOUT LOST MY MIND!!!!!!!!!! They cut about half way through one of the strands of RG6. So close to the actual outlet/box/wall.........

I am going to go OFF on somebody if I don't get some reassuring info tonight. So please help!

Can I "patch" this cable? If I can not I insist that these drywallers take every piece of sheetrock off the wall and the ceiling, pull all the insulation out and run a new ($80.00) component cable.

I can not believe these guys did this. Good thing I checked to cuz they would have not said a word about it.

Anybody have any calming info for a guy in need?

rbinck
01-25-2008, 08:50 PM
You should be able to patch it if you are pretty good with a soldering iron.

Scottnot
01-25-2008, 08:53 PM
UGH!!!

Even though I could do it myself, I think I would insist that they pay for you to bring a a "professional A/V guy to "repair" the cable.
The repair will be to cut the cable, carefully install two high quality connectors and use a barrel connector to join the two pieces.
This repair will be "almost" as good as new (meaning that you will never see the difference in picture quality.
Since the component cables are only carrying baseband signals, the slight mismatch introduced by the repair will have no real effect on their performance.

rbinck
01-26-2008, 10:39 PM
If you go with the connector route, I would put an access plate in the wall. Connectors have a tendency to cause problems inside of walls. A good soldering job would be much better if you are going to bury it in a wall, imo.

Scottnot
01-26-2008, 11:34 PM
A good soldering job would be much better if you are going to bury it in a wall, imo.
I don't mean to be picky, but I have never seen or heard of "splicing" a coaxial cable with a soldering iron.
- Problem #1 the discontinuity (impedance mismatch) would be horendous.
- Problem #2 some braid is not solderable, and even if it is, wrapping it all to one side to solder seems pretty yuck.
- One somewhat reasonable and conventional method might be to construct a small pc board with a short 75 ohm microstrip line on it and use it as a "splice"; "properly" terminating the coax in this manner can greatly reduce mismatch resulting from the discontinuity.

Scottnot
01-27-2008, 08:09 AM
You might check out good ol' Radio Shack . . .

This looks like it might be a male/female pair of terminations;
of course it might also just the a pair of connetors with a barrel;
anyway, worth a look . . .

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103381

boxturtle
01-27-2008, 08:39 AM
You might check out good ol' Radio Shack . . .

This looks like it might be a male/female pair of terminations;
of course it might also just the a pair of connetors with a barrel;
anyway, worth a look . . .

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103381

Thanks. That looks like it might be the ticket. I've calmed down a bit but am still quite disappointed in the drywaller guys. This is a pretty good example of "undocumented" workers and the quality "work" they are doing to save us all money!

So what you guys are saying is just patch it and don't worry about it. I can handle that. I just didn't know how fussy these cable can be when we're dealing with HDTV. I guess the signal is already going through a places where RG6 has been connected so I won't freak.

Thanks guys!

rbinck
01-27-2008, 08:46 AM
I don't mean to be picky, but I have never seen or heard of "splicing" a coaxial cable with a soldering iron.
- Problem #1 the discontinuity (impedance mismatch) would be horendous.
- Problem #2 some braid is not solderable, and even if it is, wrapping it all to one side to solder seems pretty yuck.
- One somewhat reasonable and conventional method might be to construct a small pc board with a short 75 ohm microstrip line on it and use it as a "splice"; "properly" terminating the coax in this manner can greatly reduce mismatch resulting from the discontinuity.I don't think we are talking about individual coax cables like rg6 or 59 quad shield here but a component cable. Pull back the connectors on the ends of component cables and what do you find? Solder joints. The impedance issues over 1/2" at a splice will be nothing. As far as a shield splice goes, the component cables shields solder just fine. That's how most connect to the RCA plugs on the ends.

It is a good idea to keep the joint as short as possible, but component signals can and are sent over twisted pairs unshielded all of the time with baluns, so a 1/2" of unshielded joint is hardly going to be a big issue.

Chances are the OP will have problems with soldering properly anyway, and if that is the case the best answer would be to get the cable replaced or hire someone to patch the cable.

On the other hand if we are talking about individual rg6 cables that accept F connectors, then the barrel splice will be the way to go. Just allow for access to them.

Scottnot
01-27-2008, 08:51 AM
I've calmed down a bit but am still quite disappointed in the drywaller guys. This is a pretty good example of "undocumented" workers and the quality "work" they are doing to save us all money!
Good that you have calmed down, and don't feel like the lone ranger, we've all been there. Reminds me of the roofing guy I hired a few years back to save a few bucks . . . then the rains came . . . I'll spare you the details.

So what you guys are saying is just patch it and don't worry about it. I can handle that. I just didn't know how fussy these cable can be when we're dealing with HDTV. I guess the signal is already going through a places where RG6 has been connected so I won't freak.
Correct. Component connections are extremely forgiving, so an additional splice will make no difference. RG6 cable is designed to handle signals up to 1.0 gHz and higher; the component signal requires less than 50 mHz of bandwidth so it's not like your stretching the capabilities of the cable. You'll be fine.

caliberconst.
01-28-2008, 05:36 PM
Im a contractor, you should make them replace the whole cable, screw trying to fix it. No matter what you do its not a nice new cable anymore. If they wont discount you $80.00 then they are not a professional company and you should tell them that you will never do buisness again and will tell everyone you know. They have enough proffit to discount $80.00. Part of their job is not to hit ANY of the wires and they know it.