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RG-11 coaxial cable & connectors question

gcd0865
01-03-2008, 05:40 PM
Hi All:

Related to my recent post about my experience with RG-11 coaxial cable, I have a question about attaching end connectors for it. Since I have some of this cable and a dozen end connectors sitting around (courtesy of a kind cable technician a few years back), and the price was right (free), I might as well add this into my OTA antenna system while I'm improving it. The cable has never been used, and it reads "Ameritech Flooded" on the outer jacket - it is the kind intended for being buried underground, as it includes the sticky waterproof layer around the outer braid. I have it wired throughout my house for the cable tv and it provided a small, but noticeable, improvement over RG-6 when it was installed.

The end connectors are the Thomas & Betts SNS11AS Snap-N-Seal variety (hxxp://technicalconnectionsinc.stores.yahoo.net/thbelrcrgsnf.html) and the cable technician used a dedicated snap tool for compressing the fitting. Since I've never stripped this type of cable or attached snap-fit end connectors of any kind, does anyone have experience with this cable and preferred connectors/strippers/compression tools for same?

Seems that a universal RG-6/RG-11 stripper (maybe hxxp://technicalconnectionsinc.stores.yahoo.net/sa87rgandrgs.html) and a universal RG-6/RG-11 snap tool (maybe hxxp://technicalconnectionsinc.stores.yahoo.net/sa90snintorg.html) would be good for allowing me to work with both kinds of cable from time to time.

Sorry about the hxxp's - I'm new to this forum. Thanks in advance for any comments/recommendations...

Scottnot
01-03-2008, 05:49 PM
Just my opinion, but it hardly seems that going to all of the trouble and effort to install runs of RG11 is worth it, as all it gets you over RG6 is a few tenths of a dB less attentuation over a hundred foot or so run. Why bother???

rbinck
01-03-2008, 06:34 PM
Maybe since he has it would be a reason, I don't know. Compression tools and strippers should be available at www.partsexpress.com (http://www.partsexpress.com). The strippers I use are adjustable with an allen wrench. They will also work with RG6, but the fittings are different. Whether you use your RG11 or buy new RG6, you will need the compression tool and stripper and since you have the cable and connectors, I'd say go for it.

gcd0865
01-03-2008, 06:42 PM
I know it seems like overkill, but like some others on this board, I'm apparently right on the edge of several fringe UHF HD stations with my current setup, and so I'm trying to improve the wiring and cut out extra connectors, etc. to get those stations to lock without pixelating like they do now.

I was considering these values for loss per 100 feet:

RG-6
50MHZ - 1.53 (Typically ch 2 in most systems)
450MHZ - 3.85 (Typically ch 60)
750MHZ - 5.6 (Typically ch 117, upper digital band)
1 GHZ - 6.5

RG-11
50MHZ - 0.92 (Typically ch 2 in most systems)
450MHZ - 2.5 (Typically ch 60)
750MHZ - 3.37 (Typically ch 117, upper digital band)
1 GHZ - 4.43

I'd be running between 35-50 feet of the RG-11 for the antenna, and the channels of interest right now are in the upper UHF. Of course, the RG-11 would only eek out maybe an extra 0.3-0.5 dB for these UHF channels, but since I have the cable and connectors sitting around (and got them for free), I thought I'd learn to attach the ends now, for eventually connecting more of it to a DirecTv dish, to avoid rain fade (as much as possible) at the much higher satellite frequencies.

Scottnot
01-04-2008, 05:53 AM
I'd be running between 35-50 feet of the RG-11 for the antenna, and the channels of interest right now are in the upper UHF. Of course, the RG-11 would only eek out maybe an extra 0.3-0.5 dB for these UHF channels, but since I have the cable and connectors sitting around (and got them for free), I thought I'd learn to attach the ends now, . . .
You're right about the almost insignificant loss; if you can deal with the bulkiness of the cable and have no problems running it, it certainly won't do any harm to use RG11.

. . . for eventually connecting more of it to a DirecTv dish, to avoid rain fade (as much as possible) at the much higher satellite frequencies.
Using RG11 won't offer any benefit with regard to rain fade, as this is atmospheric and the signal is already pretty well shot before it ever gets to the antenna.

Mark M
01-04-2008, 12:54 PM
Just be aware that over time the sticky glue will seep out and stain. When I worked for Time Warner Cable it was against the rules to use flooded cable indoors.