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Using a DLP as a large computer display?

scoosdad
12-01-2007, 09:36 AM
I'm looking for feedback on currently available rear projection DLP models that people have used as computer displays and gotten good results.

Background: my company has a large client who has a security operations center that runs 24/7 where they are looking at hundreds of security cameras, all coming into PC's over their network, and then formatted into displays looking like tic-tac-toe boards with up to 16 cameras on one display. They have gone through large LCD monitors very quickly with burn-in (and please don't turn this thread into a "LCD's don't burn" thread, that's simply not true in this application; I've got five 42" professional NEC LCD monitors in this facility, and another roomful of professional Mitsubishi LCD's with permanent burn-in to show you if you don't believe that!), and we've suggested that perhaps moving to large rear projection DLP displays would eliminate all possibilities of burn-in marring the images.

I have a two year old Samsung HL-R4667 myself that I've connected to a PC, and the results are fair to poor (picture quality wise). It's limited to 1024 x 768 and when it stretches across the width of the 16:9 screen the scaling artifacts are pretty apparent. I'd say picture quality was only fair.

Can anyone out there who uses their DLP as a computer monitor on a regular basis recommend a current model that gives a good result with both images and text? The ability to show the image completely underscanned is a must (the entire width and height of the PC signal must be showing, no masking around the edges). Thanks.

georgethompson
12-01-2007, 12:02 PM
I'll give it a try on my Samsung DLP tomorrow and let you know how it turns out.

Darrylhifi
12-01-2007, 12:59 PM
A HLR should look good as a computer display, but I believe there are a couple of tricks {tweaks} in the set up needed. If no one here knows the magic bullet , try Samsung tier 2 support and also the AVS Forum

BNCR
12-01-2007, 01:58 PM
I have used Infocus front projectors with pretty good results using Pelco MX4016CD camera muxes. We got as good a result as a S-video connection can provide.

You really need multiple pro level rear projection displays and muxes to do cctv on a large install. Planar is the display mux manufacturer that I have seen the most of.

scoosdad
12-02-2007, 06:05 PM
A HLR should look good as a computer display, but I believe there are a couple of tricks {tweaks} in the set up needed.

It looked OK, but not great. I adjusted the gamma settings in the laptop's video card that I used for the test and that made some difference in picture quality but of course didn't do anything for text quality, which in this application is going to be secondary anyway.

This morning I did a test with a friend's HLS-6187 (maybe a 6188 not sure), and everything (text included) looked much much better. So I think the later model Samsung's will work since it appears that they're getting better at it, compared to my HLR.

scoosdad
12-02-2007, 06:16 PM
You really need multiple pro level rear projection displays and muxes to do cctv on a large install. Planar is the display mux manufacturer that I have seen the most of.

The company I work for is a dealer/installer for some of the best commercial grade rear projection videowall systems on the planet, and we've done network operations center for some big utilities, transportation system, and computer networking and server hubs.

That said, we're only looking here to replace some pole-mounted 42" NEC LCD computer monitors that have horrendous burns in them, with something that can maybe sit on shelves behind the control consoles, that won't burn. The client considers these kinds of things to be basically disposable, and is looking for a less expensive type of display that they can hopefully get a few more hours on them than they got out of the LCDs before they toss them and buy something new again. We're not stocking dealer for consumer-grade rear projection DLP equipment, so we don't have a bunch of them sitting in the warehouse that I can test, so that's why I'm asking here.

BNCR
12-03-2007, 07:50 PM
Hi scoosdad,

I also work in the network operations field out of Las Vegas.

I have had multiple clients try consumer RPDLPs and found the 24/7/365 use caused them to go through a bulb every two to four months and Light Engines last a year.

And yes we found the LCD displays get cooked bad in these applications as you mentioned.

The fact is these displays are disposable in commercial environments.

Good Luck!!!