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Burn-in --- Should I worry?

marylandmx
03-03-2005, 04:31 PM
I have a brand new 36inch(4:3) Panasonic HDTV, I bought this set because I fiqured out that I was getting a better deal than buying a 34inch widescreen TV. I discovered that when watching SD broadcast I get the "Whole" picture and when I watch 16:9 format the picture is only half an inch smaller than a 34inch widescreen.My question now is if I watch a 16:9 movie or two,back to back, will I have to worry about the dreaded burn-in issue.Thanks for all answers!

gollum
03-03-2005, 05:03 PM
My question now is if I watch a 16:9 movie or two,back to back, will I have to worry about the dreaded burn-in issue.Thanks for all answers!
not on a CRT, but you might want to adjust the brightness and contrast.:)

RSawdey
03-04-2005, 01:08 AM
Sorry, gollum, anything that uses phosphors can burn in... direct view CRT, RP CRT, Plasma, SED, FED. Keeping brightness & contrast moderate, and stretching & zooming your image to keep the screen filled, will slow the process. Unfortunately, it is impossible to zoom or stretch an HD signal on a 4:3 semi-compatible HDTV... and the contrast between the unused parts of the screen (with collapsed raster) and the lighted image is high.

You didn't get a better deal... you got a set that tries to show 2 million pixels in the center 3/4 of the screen, but fills the screen with only 330,000, and shows HDTV as 'shortscreen' instead of widescreen. Since the wide HDTV image has so much more detail, it should be shown larger, not smaller. Most phosphor based sets recommend the user not use modes that don't fill the screen more than 15% of time used... but that will be very difficult when SDTV is turned off in 22 months.

gollum
03-04-2005, 10:14 PM
Sorry, gollum, anything that uses phosphors can burn in... direct view CRT, RP CRT, Plasma, SED, FED.
The question was "Burn-in --- Should I worry?" and I said no...:o
But yes, only DLP and LCos are not subject to the burn-in.
Some tips (click the image below↓)
http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/images/keohihdtv_topbanner_1.gif (http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/learnabout/definitions/burnin.html)

(http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/learnabout/definitions/burnin.html)

Hvatum
03-04-2005, 10:39 PM
The question was "Burn-in --- Should I worry?" and I said no...:o
But yes, only DLP and LCos are not subject to the burn-in.
Some tips (click the image below↓)
http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/images/keohihdtv_topbanner_1.gif (http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/learnabout/definitions/burnin.html)

(http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/learnabout/definitions/burnin.html)

Have you ever actually seen burn-in? My computer at home has a black background and the windows XP silver theme with no screensaver. I've yet to ever notice any sort of burn in on that CRT. Are CRT televisions different?

gollum
03-04-2005, 11:03 PM
Have you ever actually seen burn-in? My computer at home has a black background and the windows XP silver theme with no screensaver. I've yet to ever notice any sort of burn in on that CRT. Are CRT televisions different?
actually, not on any of my TVs or monitors (even the very old ones):p, but I think, I remeber seening a :eek:samsung:eek: with some lines... (but that is the reason you stay away from "those" brands)
Again that is why I said that Marylandmx would not have to worry about burn-in that much.

RSawdey
03-05-2005, 06:26 PM
Direct view CRT aren't nearly as susceptible as the RPTVs based on CRTS... the projectors have to run their guns really bright to illuminate the whole big screen. Plasmas are also susceptible, and early ones aged FAST...

Anything with phosphors CAN burn in... the way to avoid it is to keep the screen filled & not display static images. Speed of deterioration depends on contrast & brightness.

I've worked with embedded PC systems for 20 years, and have seen plenty of burn in on PC monitors. Used to be a worse problem, but it still exists...

Marylandmx has the problem of a 4:3 TV semi-compatible with HDTV... it automatically letterboxes for HD signals, leaving 1/4 of the screen turned off. The used portion will dim with age at a speed depending on the brightness... most CRT based TVs recommend you not watch content that doesn't fill the screen for more than 15% of the time.