High Def Forum
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Dont beat me up to bad. (Cable question)

enoeht
06-08-2007, 01:37 PM
Im reading the boards here trying to learn did some searches and cant find a specific answer, I also see everyone helping each other so I built up the courage to post.:hithere:

For High Def what outputs are supported and what format of HD?
All of the common ones today?

COAX?
RCA?
I know HDMI and component. I am seriously sorry for the ignorance on my level, Like I said just trying to pick it up.

rwdavis2
06-08-2007, 02:03 PM
Im reading the boards here trying to learn did some searches and cant find a specific answer, I also see everyone helping each other so I built up the courage to post.:hithere:

For High Def what outputs are supported and what format of HD?
All of the common ones today?

COAX?
RCA?
I know HDMI and component. I am seriously sorry for the ignorance on my level, Like I said just trying to pick it up.

What exactly are you trying to do? Bseides the 2 (HDMI and component) you mention only DVI carries an HD signal. RCA is a type of connector and is irrelevent of the signals it carries. Component cables use RCA connectors.
As far as I know coax may carry an HD signal from the cable company you don't use coax to connect devices such as DVD to TV>
BD

enoeht
06-08-2007, 02:17 PM
Im not trying tohook up anything im trying to understand the transport medium.

When using standard RCA cables or the Yellow video portion can you carry an HD signal? They same with Coax is it possible? Or is the standard today that HD out of a Set Top Box or digital cable box not to broadcast HD out of those ports. It is very genric, and just a plea for understanding of the "transport" side of High Def. I aplogize for the mis nominclature on RCA I knew better than that :)

I do not have HD service as of yet I am researching the technology.

Rick-F
06-08-2007, 02:34 PM
rwdavis2 is correct in that "RCA" is a type of connector, or plug, on the end of a cable. It is not a type of cable. The Yellow composite cable that has an RCA connector aon each end will NOT carry, transport, and HD signal. COMPONENT cable(s)-- it takes 3 cables to carry the HD video signal to the TV.

A coax can carry the HD Video, SD Video, and the appropriate sound for both . . . If you have an HD TV with a QAM tuner you can connect the cable company's coax directly to your TV and watch Digital SD and HD and get 5.1 surround sound if your set is properly equipped.

m_vanmeter
06-09-2007, 07:27 AM
Video cables:
1. yellow color "composite" is analog SD (standard definition 480i) video made of 75 ohm coax with RCA connectors.
2. S-video is a slightly higher grade analog video cable than" "composite" and uses a 5 pin DIN round connector. Still analog SD, 480i
3. "Component" is a set of cables made up of three 75 ohm coax cables with RCA connectors marked Red-Green-Blue. "Component" cables can carry analog HD video signals (720p and 1080i)
4. "HDMI" is the current top end for true digital HD signals. HDMI can carry the digital video signal as well as digital audio signals. DVI is also digital HD video signals, but carries video only. It predated HDMI by several years. The digital video is the same as the digital video portion of HDMI. (720p, 1080i, and 1080p)

Audio cables:
1. Red-White audio cable with RCA connectors is for standard analog "stereo only" audio. By far the most common audio cables available but not for the more complex surround sound systems using Dolby or other digital surround encoders.
2. TosLink optical cable is now the standard "optical" cable for digital audio connections between the source and the 5.1/6.1/7.1 home theater sound system.
3. Coax optical cable. This is 75 ohm coax with RCA connectors and can carry the full digital sound feed, just like TosLink optical, but was used to avoid paying royalities to Toshiba to use their TosLink optical cable patent. I believe Toshiba has removed the royality requirements on TosLink now, so coax digital audio cables is less common now except on very low priced systems.

Hope this long-winded reply helps, it is kind of overwhelming to stare at all the possible connectors and cables and figure it out.

A couple of hints:
1. When hooking up your future system, pick one type of connection scheme for each input. In other words, if the TV 1 input has yellow composite, S-video, and R-G-B component - USE 1 input, don't connect the yellow composite and the three component R-G-B cables because they can interfer with each other. Same with audio, don't connect R-W stereo audio to the same input using TosLink optical, just pick one system.

2. Most important, DON'T spend a ton of money on high cost "special" cables. Dealers make a huge amount of profit on these beauties and push them hard. My $6 HDMI cable from www.monoprice.com works just as good as a $75 HDMI cable from Mon$ter, only I got to keep the $69 to spend on other neat stuff. I have bought a bunch of cables from Monoprice for myself, work, and other family members and all have worked exceedingly well.

Good Luck