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Pacific Media Reports Rear Projection HDTV Sales Rise In January

eHDMI
03-18-2007, 09:23 AM
Pacific Media Associates, global market information experts on large-screen displays, reports that January unit sales of rear projection HDTVs in North America outpaced December’s record mark by 1.5 percent. By contrast, consumer flat panel sales for the same period declined by 20 percent. Their monthly RPTV Sell-Through Tracking Service also shows that the average street price tumbled nearly 10 percent in January.

“We saw inventories shrink as a result of aggressive discounting,” according to Rosemary Abowd, Vice President with Pacific Media. “Two thirds of the models had lower average street prices than in December.”

DLP models gained 19 unit sales share points to reach a dominant 70 percent market share. Online retailer sales of deeply discounted LG Electronics models played a large part in this gain. The 60-inch to 69-inch 1080p segment was the most popular, with nearly a 21 percent unit market share. Average street prices for 55-inch to 59-inch 720p models declined nearly 40 percent due to close-out sales of certain models.

Samsung regained its lead over Sony in unit sales, but Sony remained on top with a 30 percent revenue share. The top selling model for January was the 62-inch Toshiba 62HM196, which took a 7.4 percent unit market share with an average street price of $1,818.

Source (http://www.avrev.com/news/0307/16.rptvsales030.shtml)

BobY
03-18-2007, 09:06 PM
I always have to wonder what the point of articles like this are.

Are they trying to convince people that RPTV's are gaining momentum? If so, they need to include some real numbers, not percentage increases and decreases that mean nothing by themselves.

The key here:

"Average street prices for 55-inch to 59-inch 720p models declined nearly 40 percent due to close-out sales of certain models."

Close-outs at blow out prices don't tell you anything about what the market is going to do on an ongoing basis (unless you plan to keep selling all of your products at close-out, blow out prices)...

18 is # 1
03-19-2007, 09:53 AM
I think the RPTVs are getting into a low enough price range that those who are less likely to part with there money are surrendering to HD.

JP1inmichigan
03-19-2007, 10:56 AM
It worked for me! I picked up a Philips 51" 1080i RPTV back in December for $750.00 (with discount through employer). It was a price I couldn't refuse . . .

BobY
03-19-2007, 11:04 AM
Sure, but these are blow-out prices. Once the inventory is gone, you're not going to see these kinds of prices anymore. You might not even see any RPTV's anymore...

John Oliver
03-19-2007, 11:54 AM
So it sounds like DLP's are favorites because of the "blow out" prices? This was before the LED DLP's I assume. I was favoring a Sony SRD until I read on this forum about the ghost problem. I'm going to wait if that issue is resolved in the XBR2 series. Thank you all for posting on issues uncovered.

I wish SED would roll out, anxious to see it. Anyone know of where one can followup on the court case, and what is the law suit about?

thanks,
jo

Lee Stewart
03-19-2007, 02:49 PM
Sure, but these are blow-out prices. Once the inventory is gone, you're not going to see these kinds of prices anymore. You might not even see any RPTV's anymore...

Yes and No . . Manufacturers are clearing out their warehouses of the "old style" of RPTV to make room for the "new style" of RPTV which is about 11" deep and can if you choose, be hung on a wall like a FPD. Look for many LED RPTV's to get rid of blub and color wheel and look for Laser Light Engine in November to replace/augment LED.

These blow-out prices are clearence items.

firsTraveler
03-19-2007, 05:53 PM
720p is rapidly dieing.

Lee Stewart
03-19-2007, 06:06 PM
720p is rapidly dieing.

Bound to happen. The day LCD came out with 1920x1080 that was the first day of the end of 768P PDP. Very happy with mine. Gets the job done very well from 10' where I sit.

BobY
03-20-2007, 08:47 AM
We'll see. Once the new models come in, the prices will go back up and sales will drop.

IMHO, the only hope RPTV has for the future is *much* bigger screens than you can get with Plasma or LCD. The only advantage that RPTV has compared to either true flat-panel technology is larger screen size for the price.

Lee Stewart
03-20-2007, 09:18 AM
We'll see. Once the new models come in, the prices will go back up and sales will drop.

IMHO, the only hope RPTV has for the future is *much* bigger screens than you can get with Plasma or LCD. The only advantage that RPTV has compared to either true flat-panel technology is larger screen size for the price.

Totally agree . . .I did read that Mits will offer a Laser Light RPTV in 4th Qtr. 2007

JP1inmichigan
03-20-2007, 10:46 AM
The only advantage that RPTV has compared to either true flat-panel technology is larger screen size for the price.
Believe it or not, not everyone is rolling in dough, so that is pretty important to some people (points to self). There is no way that I could have afforded a 51" LCD or Plasma, however for less than I paid for my last TV, I am thoroughly enjoying my 51" RP.

(In case you're wondering - I paid $995.00 for my last TV - in 1995 - a top of the line 31"!)

BobY
03-20-2007, 02:58 PM
I hear you, but not everyone needs or wants a really big screen and most people prefer the picture quality and thinner package of LCD and Plasma (still significantly thinner than the new RPTV's coming out). Also, these new RPTV's are going to cost more than the current crop as they are new technology.

All I'm saying is, RPTV's are for people who don't want a front projector but do want a really big screen (>60"), which isn't available from direct-view LCD or Plasma, or for people who want a screen bigger than 42", can't afford an LCD/Plasma and don't care that the picture isn't as good. But the prices of LCD's in particular are going to fall and RPTV's under 50" are going to have a hard time competing price-wise. I think for them to stay in the market, they are going to have to go with larger than 60" screens to compete.

I can understand why people who want the maximum bang for their buck are grabbing RPTV's right now--they are cutting the prices to move old inventory. That's a temporary situation. The question is, what's going to happen with these new sets? I suspect that one of the reasons there's a glut of RPTV inventory out there is people are losing interest in that technology as real flat-panel displays come down in price and increase in picture quality.