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Backlash in full swing...

ah802
12-31-2006, 02:56 PM
Engadget is reporting consumer dissatisfaction with HD purchases over the holidays. Looks like all the issues on this forum have come home to roost in one swell. The biggest complaint seems to be... where's the PQ quality; comparing their home display with the shops they bought from.

http://www.engadgethd.com/2006/12/30/millions-miffed-at-poor-quality-from-holiday-hdtv-purchase/

Looks like the consumer has adopted HD in a big way this season, but none of the original issues have settled out.

rbinck
12-31-2006, 04:00 PM
I don't know if the salesmen don't know better or if they purposely withhold the information about needing HD service, but in any case it is true most HDTV buyers have no idea, some for years after they get their HDTV.

borromini
12-31-2006, 09:36 PM
It's hard to believe that consumers are still so uninformed. Since 2001, there have been hundreds... maybe thousands of articles from throughout the nation's newspapers and magazines where "HD 101" was discussed and the sources of HD programming identified. Did no one read those articles? :confused:

firsTraveler
01-01-2007, 12:06 AM
It's hard to believe that consumers are still so uninformed. Since 2001, there have been hundreds... maybe thousands of articles from throughout the nation's newspapers and magazines where "HD 101" was discussed and the sources of HD programming identified. Did no one read those articles? :confused:


Most people delibleratly go threw life uninformed about just about everything.

paulman182
01-01-2007, 08:36 AM
I must say if I were a salesman, I would not be ready for something like this.

I just would not expect customers to come in and pay $1000, $2000 and up for something that they did not even know what it was.

paulc
01-01-2007, 09:35 AM
Doesn't surprise me at all. What really gets my goat is the fact that so many wear their ignorance as a badge of pride (with apologies to Brother James, "I'm dumb and I'm proud"). My guess is a lot of sets are being sold for 2 and only 2 reasons. Prices have fallen quite a bit and the guy next door got one (that one prompted by incessant press stories).

Still, once one actually has some understanding about the technology, one's concern falls on the content side. Lots of set being bought, even fro the "wrong" reason should go a long way to getting more content produced. One of my New Year's wishes is for Sundance, IFC, and TCM to at least start broadcasting HD. The more sets sold, the closer we get.

GerryG
01-01-2007, 11:14 AM
Did no one read those articles?

Read? READ? Heh.

ah802
01-01-2007, 01:33 PM
Doesn't surprise me at all. What really gets my goat is the fact that so many wear their ignorance as a badge of pride (with apologies to Brother James, "I'm dumb and I'm proud").

I like that one.... sheep to be lead to the slaughter.

Information overload... educators do it all the time, then when the student fails.... 'Wha... you didn't read that part?'. It's sorta like the Vietnam/Iraq war.... media overload with buzz words that take time to digest.

So when it's time to replace the venerable TV; People rely on the word of the salesman (the brand/superstore protection) and their favourite media adviser on ch9 news bite. Only to find that brand and store are not their 'real' friends, manufacturers are cash grabbing, programming is all hype... and HDTV is all smoke & mirrors at the store.

I suspect this tactic will set consumer spending back quite a distance, salesman will have reached new lows for trust, and content providers will have cut their own throats in the fury.

I'd laugh at peoples ignorance.. but for the fact that we need to change 'Brother James' mind set without getting into Iran.

Beck38
01-01-2007, 03:20 PM
Most people delibleratly go threw life uninformed about just about everything.

That says it all. The book "Everything I needed to learn, I learned in Kindergarten" comes to mind everytime I run into someone who started NOT learning anything at that point, and continued onward through their Doctoral Dissertation. :eek:

Diogenes
01-01-2007, 04:27 PM
read a story by C. M. Kornbluth (sf) titled "The Marching Morons", it explains a lot.

maicaw
01-01-2007, 04:53 PM
... The book "Everything I needed to learn, I learned in Kindergarten" comes to mind every time I run into someone who started NOT learning anything at that point, and continued onward through their Doctoral Dissertation. :eek:The old "experience is the best teacher" canard -probably meant when people did "teach" themselves - they would learn - at their own expense - perhaps also learning the value of reading up beforehand - -
But now it seems - the A/V media is the default instructor and no one wants to take responsibility to pursue privately their own ability to be better informed.

Just by googling a question and adding wikipedia to the string - almost always turns up accurate readable articles in a few seconds
According to Nature - Wikipedia on average - yields equal factual reliability as the average academic journal -
(Leave out the wikipedia and YMMV):rolleyes:
According to one biography I read - Harry Truman as a child read the entire Encyclopedia Britannica -
Hard to believe any layman - especially a child would even attempt that - considering the highly academic (grad level) articles Britannica used in those days.
I have two sets - the 1980s and the1940s versions =
Surprising how much of that old ink is still correct, relevant and educational no matter how wise one feels beforehand

edit - for example -Here's part of a wikipedia article found using the google search "The Marching Morons" Kornbluth
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyril_M._Kornbluth ..."The Little Black Bag" was adapted for television by the BBC in 1969 for its Out of the Unknown series. In 1970, the same story was adapted by Rod Serling for an episode of his Night Gallery series. This dramatization starred Burgess Meredith as the alcoholic Dr. Full, who has lost his license and become a derelict. He finds a bag containing advanced medical technology from the future, which, after an unsuccessful attempt to pawn it, he uses benevolently reclaiming his career and redeeming his soul ... but not that of the guttersnipe he takes in as his receptionist/assistant.

"The Marching Morons" was one of Kornbluth's most famous short stories; it is a satirical look at a far future in which the world's population consists of five billion idiots and a few million geniuses the precarious minority of the "elite" working desperately to keep things running behind the scenes. Part of its appeal is that readers identify with the beleaguered geniuses (which is entirely compatible with science fiction fans' broadly held opinion of their relationship with the mundane majority). Few people realize that "The Marching Morons" is a direct sequel to "The Little Black Bag": it is easy to miss this, as "Bag" is set in the contemporary present while "Morons" takes place several centuries from now, and there is no character who appears in both stories. The titular black bag in the first story is actually an artifact from the time period of "The Marching Morons": a medical kit filled with self-driven instruments enabling a far-future moron to "play doctor."...
and the actual story here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Marching_Morons

Beck38
01-01-2007, 08:58 PM
The old "experience is the best teacher" canard -probably meant when people did "teach" themselves - they would learn - at their own expense - perhaps also learning the value of reading up beforehand - -

Remember 'Best Years Of Our Lives'? The quote that alwasy rings true to me is, that the Army taught the guy how to LEARN. It did for me as well,, a skill sadly lacking in the general population these days.
Then they sent me off to college (TWICE) and I sucked that up preety well too.

Just by googling a question and adding wikipedia to the string - almost always turns up accurate readable articles in a few seconds
According to Nature - Wikipedia on average - yields equal factual reliability as the average academic journal -
(Leave out the wikipedia and YMMV):rolleyes:
According to one biography I read - Harry Truman as a child read the entire Encyclopedia Britannica -

So did I, in the mid-60's. My parents and older sister thought I was NUTS (kinda still do!) :)

I'm always taken aback here by folks who simply don't move their mouse a couple inches and find the answer right on their screen.

Here's part of a wikipedia article found using the google search "The Marching Morons" Kornbluth

I remember that story, I inhaled scifi when young.

It recently was made into a movie by Mike Judge (of MTV 'fame'), don't know if they gave credit to Kornbluth though.

maicaw
01-01-2007, 09:25 PM
It recently was made into a movie by Mike Judge (of MTV 'fame'), don't know if they gave credit to Kornbluth though.Are you referring to Idiocracy - it's due out on DVD this month http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/dvd
http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117931441.html?categoryid=31&cs=1&p=0

Beck38
01-01-2007, 09:38 PM
Are you referring to Idiocracy - it's due out on DVD this month http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/dvd
http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117931441.html?categoryid=31&cs=1&p=0


Yep; it's on my Netflix queue. Out 9 Jan.

paulc
01-02-2007, 09:11 AM
Speaking of the Encyclopedia Britannica, I remember way back in my academic days trucking out to Brooklyn frequently because they had the 1911 version: reputed to be THE best version. Reputation and fact were one and the same in this case.

SLedford
01-02-2007, 09:34 AM
Before I buy anything I read as much about the product that I can on the internet. I pay special attention to what actual purchasers have to say and give this a lot of weight. Most people do not do this (or any other research).

These same people, however, are quick to blame the BB or CC salesman, who may not know much more than they do about the product they are looking at. They are surprised that the analog signal they are getting from cable doesn't look as good as the high def feed they saw at the store. They are surprised at the lighting issues in their great rooms with large glass windows. The store (in a dark corner, with no windows) didn't have that problem.

Hopefully this will help generate some heat on the content providers to add more HD programming and channels.

akron05
01-02-2007, 11:00 AM
Engadget is reporting consumer dissatisfaction with HD purchases over the holidays. Looks like all the issues on this forum have come home to roost in one swell. The biggest complaint seems to be... where's the PQ quality; comparing their home display with the shops they bought from.

http://www.engadgethd.com/2006/12/30/millions-miffed-at-poor-quality-from-holiday-hdtv-purchase/

Looks like the consumer has adopted HD in a big way this season, but none of the original issues have settled out.

OK...let's see.

First off, about 20% of those complaining have their components incorrectly connected (using RF, composite, or S-video connections.) Another 20% have the settings wrong on their TV (contrast, etc) and another 10% aren't actually getting any HD content. The other 50% are a combination of the above.

akron05
01-02-2007, 11:01 AM
Before I buy anything I read as much about the product that I can on the internet. I pay special attention to what actual purchasers have to say and give this a lot of weight. Most people do not do this (or any other research).

These same people, however, are quick to blame the BB or CC salesman, who may not know much more than they do about the product they are looking at. They are surprised that the analog signal they are getting from cable doesn't look as good as the high def feed they saw at the store. They are surprised at the lighting issues in their great rooms with large glass windows. The store (in a dark corner, with no windows) didn't have that problem.

Hopefully this will help generate some heat on the content providers to add more HD programming and channels.

Several people I know have high-def cable boxes...with HD subscription...but hook them into the TV via the RF output...so their TV is displaying only the RF Channel 2 input they're sending it.

I think all high-def buyers need to take a class called "Component Video Cables and You. A Good Match."

SLedford
01-02-2007, 12:51 PM
akron05,

You are so right about a class on technology. There are terms batted around like DLP, DVI, HDMI, Component & Composite video (I have trouble remembering which is which on these).

When I am faced with a choice that I don't understand, my tendancy is to defer the choice (or purchase) till I know what is going on. How many sales has BB lost because the customer, who went in READY TO BUY, left confused and shaking his head. If they were smart, they would funnel the buyer over to the side to watch a short, snappy & intertaining video that would tell them the plusses & minuses of each type of television. And they would be handed a simple but handy check-list with same information summarized.

If nothing else, this would make the buyer feel informed and in charge of the buying descision, which would (hopefully) cut down on suprises and complaints later on.

akron05
01-02-2007, 02:19 PM
akron05,

You are so right about a class on technology. There are terms batted around like DLP, DVI, HDMI, Component & Composite video (I have trouble remembering which is which on these).

When I am faced with a choice that I don't understand, my tendancy is to defer the choice (or purchase) till I know what is going on. How many sales has BB lost because the customer, who went in READY TO BUY, left confused and shaking his head. If they were smart, they would funnel the buyer over to the side to watch a short, snappy & intertaining video that would tell them the plusses & minuses of each type of television. And they would be handed a simple but handy check-list with same information summarized.

If nothing else, this would make the buyer feel informed and in charge of the buying descision, which would (hopefully) cut down on suprises and complaints later on.

I've been more helpful than the BB/CC/HH salespeople on several occasions.

I was in BB the other day talking with a very confused couple. All they wanted was a TV that "worked" with a roof antenna for the man's 68 year old father, who refused to get cable. They didn't want an analog that would need a box, and he neither desired, nor had good enough eyesight to benefit from, a high-def TV. He also had a budget of $350. I asked them how his OTA reception was with his rooftop antenna, and they said "it's nearly perfect now but a little snow" and I told them he could probably get just a nice 27" or so SDTV 4:3 TV with an ATSC tuner for at or under $300 and pointed them to one. This was after they had nearly decided to tell his father that there wasn't anything they could do.

firsTraveler
01-02-2007, 10:36 PM
CE stuff can be confusing; that's why buyers should find a quality local vendor, not those idiots at BB/CC/WalMart/ect.

SLedford
01-03-2007, 07:38 AM
firsTraveler,

I bought my Denon DVD player from a quality A/V store because they would work with me. I had burned my home movies onto DVD+R disks, which were not listed as playable on any of the DVD players. They worked on most, of course, but I wanted to try before I bought.

The BB / CC people couldn't / wouldn't hook up a player to a television. Their response was "if it doesn't work, bring it back and try a different model". The A/V folks let me play the disk on several different models.

Televisions are a whole different ballgame. I had done the research already and wasn't willing to pay an extra $1,000 to the AV store just to benefit from their expertise in the matter. That is the benefit of a BB - you can buy a television when they are running a special and have 3 years interest free to pay it off, if you buy it using a BB card.

borromini
01-03-2007, 10:27 AM
CE stuff can be confusing; that's why buyers should find a quality local vendor, not those idiots at BB/CC/WalMart/ect. Or join the High Def Forum! ;)

CatManDoo
01-04-2007, 05:05 AM
I don't know if the salesmen don't know better or if they purposely withhold the information about needing HD service, but in any case it is true most HDTV buyers have no idea, some for years after they get their HDTV.
Of all the B&M stores I've been in looking at HDTV's, by far the BEST at notifying customers about the need for additional sources has to be Costco. They very clearly have signs posted throughout their TV area warning that you need an HD source like cable/sat/antenna before you can view HD content. They definitely go above and beyond to make sure their customers do not get the false impression of "plug-n-play". Granted, this might be due to the lack of salespeople available to explain or demo the TV's on the floor, but you'd have to be blind or illiterate not to see or understand the warnings. Maybe it's like the statements on packs of cigarettes which warn "YOU WILL GET LUNG CANCER IF YOU SMOKE THESE"; people see that and ignore it too.

rbinck
01-04-2007, 10:31 AM
Many think they have HD service because of the "Presented In HD" notice that appears at the start of some programs and all they need is a HDTV.

borromini
01-04-2007, 12:21 PM
...Granted, this might be due to the lack of salespeople available to explain or demo the TV's on the floor, but you'd have to be blind or illiterate not to see or understand the warnings... Not having salespeople around may be a blessing when it comes to HDTV shopping. ;) Informative plaques placed around the display areas may prove to be more effective as there's less chance of intentional or unintentional misinformation, bias and neglect. :)

paulc
01-04-2007, 01:08 PM
One thing that is also an issue is that some folks fling "technical" terms around when they actually have little understanding of what they actually mean. Spouting a lot of terms sure would convince someone the "spewer" actually knew something. Then they, truly in the spirit of trying to help another noob out, reiterate that wrong piece of knowledge because they learned it from a guy who DID seems to know the terms.

Not to mention that a couple of guys who DO know what the terms mean can also disagree... but that's a whole 'nother thing.

doggie
01-05-2007, 04:19 PM
The information was alot more confusing and less readily available 4 years ago when I bought my HDTV. Now, there are guides everywhere. Consumers today don't even have to worry about the "HD-Ready" and EDTV scams that I had to sift through years ago. Wait until these people see the vertical bars on 70% of their TV programs. Then all hell is going to break loose. :p

rinardman
01-05-2007, 05:08 PM
I suspect, based on what I've heard from people I talk to, that a new TV being "HD" doesn't mean as much to them, as a TV being "LCD" or "Plasma", or "flat panel". The "ones you can hang on a wall"!

Most seem to think the "HD" is just a part of the new "flat panel" technology, and the picture is better just *because* it's LCD, or Plasma.

richiephx1
01-05-2007, 06:38 PM
In my opinion, if people plop down 3 grand blindly for a HD tv, (thinking they are going to get instant HD), without doing research first then they deserve to be tagged as "stupid". It's no one's fault but their own.

mfabien
01-06-2007, 05:51 AM
... however, if the client first pays a visit to a specialty shop the sales person should make sure the client fully understands what needs to be done or purchased to get HD.

The problem is that many go to big stores first thinking that they will "also" get proper info.

paulman182
01-06-2007, 09:20 AM
I'm also amazed that people go to stores expecting to learn anything useful. Those guys are salesmen, not teachers.

They know only enough to usually get their info close to right. And they oversimplify terribly.

If anyone is reading this who hasn't taken the HD plunge yet, please use the web to educate yourself. And take even that info with a grain of salt, considering the source!

maicaw
01-06-2007, 04:31 PM
It is frequently quoted here and on reputable websites
For a dollar/issue - this magazine is an HDTV educational bargain IMO
Home Theater Magazine (http://www.netmagazines.com/product.asp?pID=111494&c=61841&TR=&cID=4)

Any consumer would know more than 99% of the sales people if they spend the buck/month and read the tech articles in Home Theater Magazine IMO -
Nothing wrong with that -
unless they really don't want to understand the technology and trust BB with their decision
There are also some other easier to read - free - mags for customers such as one Crutchfield's sends out
and also even better ones for the really $eriou$ "phile$"

jpfrasier
01-06-2007, 04:52 PM
I personally have always been a huge fan of Crutchfield's. You may not find the best bargains but the prices are pretty standard and competitive with the market. But what you will find is great information, excellent customer service, and delivery. Been using them for about 16 years and never had a problem.

CatManDoo
01-07-2007, 09:31 PM
In my opinion, if people plop down 3 grand blindly for a HD tv, (thinking they are going to get instant HD), without doing research first then they deserve to be tagged as "stupid". It's no one's fault but their own.Agreed!

Buying a TV is like dating. If you expect to find a spouse without researching multiple possibilities, it will soon be something you're looking to dump at the next garage sale. It's best to try out several different "models" before you plunk down your life savings on a "keeper"... :D

richiephx1
01-08-2007, 01:14 AM
You must be married to your HDtv? :D

santaclauspro
01-08-2007, 10:16 AM
Engadget is reporting consumer dissatisfaction with HD purchases over the holidays. Looks like all the issues on this forum have come home to roost in one swell. The biggest complaint seems to be... where's the PQ quality; comparing their home display with the shops they bought from.

http://www.engadgethd.com/2006/12/30/millions-miffed-at-poor-quality-from-holiday-hdtv-purchase/

Looks like the consumer has adopted HD in a big way this season, but none of the original issues have settled out.

HD does seem to be catching on with a lot of people. Most people have no idea what to buy to watch HDTV. Most of the salespeople have no idea what they are talking about. I just had 2 episodes involving Circuit City and King's Great Buys +. Both stores were advertising the hitachi 65F59 and 51F59 tvs as having high def tuners built in. I even called them to confirm this and they said both tvs had built in hdtv tuners.
I then called hitachi and was told that they do not have built in hd tuners. I don't expect either store will pull this deceptive advertising because i think they just don't know or care.
There are too many choices out there and the general public has to be aware of this. You must do your home work before buying and you will have to find a way to find out all this. I don't believe the stores will be any help at all.

CatManDoo
01-09-2007, 08:13 PM
You must be married to your HDtv? :D
No, to my kitty (I'll use that word to describe my cat since the other one would probably get me banned from this site) :D

borromini
01-09-2007, 11:09 PM
No, to my kitty (I'll use that word to describe my cat since the other one would probably get me banned from this site) :D Huh, what other word? At least tell us and then we'll let you know if you'll likely get banned. ;)

Razor05
01-09-2007, 11:54 PM
Agreed!

Buying a TV is like dating. If you expect to find a spouse without researching multiple possibilities, it will soon be something you're looking to dump at the next garage sale. It's best to try out several different "models" before you plunk down your life savings on a "keeper"... :D

My same philosophy, except I use a car as an example. ;) :banana:

Type A
01-10-2007, 02:41 AM
For a dollar/issue - this magazine is an HDTV educational bargain IMO
Home Theater Magazine (http://www.netmagazines.com/product.asp?pID=111494&c=61841&TR=&cID=4)



Sold...thanks for the link

oblioman
01-10-2007, 05:12 AM
Me puss crapped in me dryer. But he knows how to watch HD with me.

RBundy13
01-10-2007, 04:03 PM
Made my HD purchase last year for the holidays. I knew there were hoops to jump through to get HD going in. My ignorance came into play at the LACK of HD programming available. I'm still a little miffed. Even this year, CBS broadcasting NFL games in my area 4:3 aspect.
CBS sucks

maicaw
01-10-2007, 04:22 PM
No, to my kitty (I'll use that word to describe my cat since the other one would probably get me banned from this site) Huh, what other word? At least tell us and then we'll let you know if you'll likely get banned. ;)Maybe better than a large gnarly rodent - Oregonians love them too :thumbsup:

Razor05
01-10-2007, 05:36 PM
Me puss crapped in me dryer. But he knows how to watch HD with me.

Heh, nothing a few tumbles wouldn't cure. ;)

meh130
01-10-2007, 06:59 PM
... however, if the client first pays a visit to a specialty shop the sales person should make sure the client fully understands what needs to be done or purchased to get HD.

The problem is that many go to big stores first thinking that they will "also" get proper info.

I have seen just as much of a lack of knowledge in the specialty shops. There is a high-end audio/video store where I grew up who always offered high-end home stereo equipment, and was the first place in tow you could by a VCR, back when they cost a small fortune. Now they are almost exclusively an HDTV store.

I went there a couple of years ago looking for indoor OTA antennas. I found the sales guy and asked what they had, figuring they would have the higher-end models. He laughed in my face. I would also note although they had some name brand DVD players, they did not have any component cables on display. Not even the ridiculously overpriced Monster Cables, the most obvious upsell for any new TV.

This was before the local cable companies had HD content. The only HD available in the area was OTA or Voom. I bet had I asked the sales guy about Voom he would have thought I was speaking a foreign language. I had had asked if a DVD player was progressive scanning he probably would have thought it was a way to fast-forward the disc.

People dropping five or six grand for 60" DLPs, or even more for huge plasmas in this store were going home and hooking them into coax cables and connecting their DVDs with SVideo at best.

When I bought my SXRD at Best Buy on Black Friday, the young sales rep asked "What are you going to connect it to?" To which I answered "My existing Dish Network ViP622 HD DVR and an Samsung HD-960 upscaling DVD player, which are currently connected to my existing Samsung HDTV." The sales guy replied "Well, I guess you are ready."

The best thing Best Buy did is started selling DirecTV HD service and Comcast Digital Cable upgrades. It solves most of the HD content problem and is a natural upsell.

That said, the industry has completely screwed up this transition. 99%+ of TV customers just want to plug the set in, connect the cable, and watch it. They think set top boxes are stupid in an era of "cable ready" TVs, and they think OTA antennas are something from the pre-cable era. I remember when a local cable company had a "get rid of the box" promotion for DBS customers.

Why a handful of HD stations cannot be streamed over ordinary cable as a ASTC/QAM signal is beyond me. Why the cable box as a minimum doesn't do this conversion leaving the TV to work like a TV is bizarre. Hook an new HDTV to SD cable content and SD content just works. Hook it up to an OTA antenna and SD and HD content just work. But HD cable and HD satellite? PITA for ordinary customers. Then add the whole HD DVD/Blu-ray Disc fiasco.

Oh, and charge a premium for everything, and if it cause more confusing and pain the the customer (like additional remotes, and complex set-top boxes), charge even more. And for HD DVD, claim the production costs will be low because they can use the same manufacturing equipment as DVD, then charge a 50% premium. And with that 50% premium don't dare include the standard DVD version in the same box so you can watch it on the old DVD player in the bedroom. I might consider the 50% premium if it was a double sided disc with a regular DVD version on the back, even though I don't have an HD disk player. At least I would be future proof, and it might drive my choice of BD vs HD DVD in the future. And if you are Blu-ray, charge twice as much for a player which has minimal technology differences with an HD DVD player.

Right now, HDTV requires of ordinary TV customers what component stereo audiophile systems require of stereo customers.

If the industry wants widespread adoption of this stuff, make it easy. At the least put the local network stations on the basic cable as a ASTC/QAM signal. Then splice in adds for digital cable upgrades. Stop resisting the cablecard initiative. Make all HD DVDs and BDs flip discs with standard DVDs on the back. If not a flip disc, then price HD DVD/BD new releases the same as the current DVD new release. Stop selling full screen DVDs, and use the extra room on the shelf for the HD DVD/BD versions. For HDTV, Cable STB, DBS vendors, and HD DVD/BD players, Consider partnering with Logitech to license their Harmony remote technology. The remotes you are including do not do much, even when the TV and the other gadgets are the same brand.

Oh, and Charlie, if you are listening, upgrade the ViP622 with an ASTC out for the second TV. As the box already has two HD tuners, it could support a second HD set if it supported ASTC on its coax.

Then maybe we can all sit down and enjoy watching our HDTVs.

MGman
01-10-2007, 07:49 PM
Thats why I switched out my A2000 with an XBR2, cable card.

CatManDoo
01-11-2007, 04:13 AM
Huh, what other word? At least tell us and then we'll let you know if you'll likely get banned. ;)
I could have said it but I wouldn't be around to see your reply. Oops, :eek: I see "oblio" got it in Post #42. :D

CatManDoo
01-11-2007, 04:17 AM
Thats why I switched out my A2000 with an XBR2, cable card.
Which XBR2 has a CableCard slot? I thought Sony dumped that after the XBR1 was through ....:confused:

oblioman
01-11-2007, 04:35 AM
Heh, nothing a few tumbles wouldn't cure. ;)
He's still trying to untwixt his man boys.

BrianO
01-11-2007, 05:56 PM
Which XBR2 has a CableCard slot? I thought Sony dumped that after the XBR1 was through ....:confused:

The SXRD XBR2 models have CableCard slots. The Bravia XBR2 models do not.

reh6
01-11-2007, 07:03 PM
I'm totally illiterate when it comes to HD TV. But I decided to take the plunge back in Dec. ( 06 ) to replace my outdated 32" TV. As a lurker I discovered this group hoping to find some enlightment. The more I read the more confused I became. After reading about all of the strange numbers and different opinions I began thinking it was too complicated for me to even think about tackling such a monster. Everything seemed to boil down to a technicality beyond my comprehension. I left this group more illiterate and more confused than when I came in. I bit the bullet during Walmart's pre Christmas sale featuring an "off" brand sleek "Symphonic" 32" LCD HD TV ( $599.00 ) with a built in tuner. I talked to no "uninformed" salesman. I brought it home, set it on the mantle, called my cable provider Charter and they were out the next day hooking up my box. We're now getting a clear crisp theater like HD image with over a dozen HD channels with great surround sound for less than $15.00/mo over what we were paying for expanded basic. Honestly I can't see why this should seem so high tech. I'm outta here but thanks anyway.

RedSIinPA
01-30-2007, 08:45 AM
to respond to the last guy, there are 1,001 tutorial websites out there describing all facets of Home Theater and HD technology. I'd recommend those sites to come up to speed before looking to a forum, which is basically an opinion mine for instruction. If you want a good one, PM me.