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Front Projection VS Rear Projection: Which one is better?

Themorioles
04-02-2006, 10:58 PM
Simple question: Which is better, Front Projection or Rear Projection TVs? (not which is a better deal)

I am planning on redoing (from the ground up) my basement into a home-theater area. The room is medium size so I am probably looking at about a 60" TV. The size of the devices and lighting in the room are not an issue.

I am looking for the best possible Home Theater Experience, so I want to know what the absolute best system for me to buy would be (no matter the price).

Which technology would be the best for me? Front Projection or Rear Projection?

maicaw
04-02-2006, 11:33 PM
I am looking for the best possible Home Theater Experience, so I want to know what the absolute best system for me to buy would be (no matter the price).check this one out then DIGITAL CINEMA PROJECTOR SC-1 SIGNATURE CINEMA™ PORTFOLIO (http://www.runco.com/image/brochures/SC-1_2-06.pdf)
MSRP (USD) : $ 250,000 “The dream behind the Signature Cinema SC-1 is to be the best that Runco has ever offered — truly our crown jewel, custom crafted for those elite few who want the very best that money can buy, and have budgeted accordingly. Its film-like quality and overall performance is simply stunning. There is nothing else in the world like it, period!”http://www.projectorcentral.com/Runco-Signature_Cinema_SC-1.htm
or the Runco Video Xtreme VX-80d Projector at only $90,000

borromini
04-03-2006, 12:30 AM
If the room will truly be a home theater then front projection hands down, since that's the only technology that truly provides a theater-like experience. Also, I don't know what you mean by the room size being "medium", but unless it's only an 8'x10' room...you should be prepared to project an image at 80" or larger...preferably 96". Now that's a home theater! :)

Themorioles
04-03-2006, 01:39 PM
Thanks for your input!

When I say money is no object, I'm looking to spend at most $10,000 on a projector, but thanks for putting in perspective for me with those $250,000 sets.

In terms of quality for normal HD television (through Comcast) is front projection better quality then rear projection?

Thanks!

Wiley
04-03-2006, 06:03 PM
I'll butt in here to ask a question: When you go to the theater where do you sit in relation to the screen? If you sit in the front row then go for the biggest image you can display on your wall/screen. If you sit in the back or in the balcony then screen size isn't as critical. If like most you sit near the middle then I would suggest this:

Go to your favorite movie theater and take with you a length of string, say about a yard long. Sit where you prefer to sit, then when the movie plays extend your arms in front of you, adjust so the distance between your fingers is the visual edges of the screen. Now do it again but this time stretch the string between your fingers. Mark the length stretched between your fingers with a small knot. Now when you return to your basement figure where you want to sit. This of course will be dependent upon what kind of sound system etc. you want (since rear speakers usually are placed behind you and you need some distance there). Now take your sting and once again stretch it out in front of you at arms length. Have someone make marks on the wall where the edges of your ideal screen would be. What is the distance between the marks? If greater than currently available rear projection sets or plasmas or LCDs or ? then you can forget about even considering them. If the distance is such that you could have one of them then you have to decide. But note: if the marks indicate that a rear projection set might work in your application then you would have to move your seat about two foot closer to the basement wall when making the size determination as the screen isn't on the wall. You can take your string with you to the stores and stretch it in front of you and see how well the different displays look. Can you decern the individual pixels? This is an empirical approach but it is your theater.

If you are planning on spending the kind of money you are talking then your basement theater should be designed around you. A ten grand projector would probably need an equivalent costing sound system, then there's seating and sound proofing (so you can enjoy what you want when you want and not have the wife filing for divorce or the neighbors calling the cops) and, of course, decor. 30 grand ought to do it up nicely.

Wiley

borromini
04-03-2006, 07:46 PM
...In terms of quality for normal HD television (through Comcast) is front projection better quality then rear projection?... The quality would be about the same. The difference is the sceen size between the two.

Now that you've identified $10k as your projector budget, try checking out www.projectorcentral.com for more info on determining what front projectors might work best within your budget.

mshulman
04-09-2006, 01:43 PM
I'll butt in here to ask a question: When you go to the theater where do you sit in relation to the screen? If you sit in the front row then go for the biggest image you can display on your wall/screen. If you sit in the back or in the balcony then screen size isn't as critical. If like most you sit near the middle then I would suggest this:

Wiley

I have to disagree here. I don't think where you sit in a movie theater relates very well to the size screen you want. Most theaters near me these days are stadium seating, except for the first 5-6 rows or so. I end up sitting somewhere in the center of the stadium seating about halfway between the bottom and top. I do this simply because it's about the center of the theater, directly in front of the screen and is always a good view.

So, by those standards, I think you'd probably say I'd be happy with a 50" TV since I sit about 10' from it at home. But, I actually am extremely happy with my 92" image.

Oh.. I'd also add - I wouldn't base anything by comparing to a movie theater experience. You can go bigger (virtually based on how close you sit) and have a much better experience at home than in the theater - I haven't been to the movies since we've gotten our projector (ok, that's a lie - I think I've been once since having it).

maicaw
04-09-2006, 02:59 PM
In a reputable interview (can't locate it now) - I read that Steven Spielberg says he like to watch from the 6-10 row of the theater -in the center section- I assume he shoots from that perspective. - another recent interview Spielberg at the Revolution-The director has seen the digital future, and he'll be there — reluctantly
Posted Tuesday, Mar. 14, 2006 (http://www.time.com/time/arts/article/0,8599,1173367,00.html) ....I only paint on the one size sheet of paper. I always make my movies for a movie theater that has, like, 500 seats, and I like to imagine how big that screen is and feel confident the audience can see a central character a hundred yards away in the lower right hand corner of that screen...

hdtvpros.com
05-01-2006, 12:09 PM
Simple question: Which is better, Front Projection or Rear Projection TVs? (not which is a better deal)

I am planning on redoing (from the ground up) my basement into a home-theater area. The room is medium size so I am probably looking at about a 60" TV. The size of the devices and lighting in the room are not an issue.

I am looking for the best possible Home Theater Experience, so I want to know what the absolute best system for me to buy would be (no matter the price).

Which technology would be the best for me? Front Projection or Rear Projection?

My opinion from experience only:
I would build a nice cabinet against the wall. And since you say your looking at about a 60" tv, have the cabinet guy build around a rptv. I would buy the HP 65" 1080p. All the specs are great and the pq is great.

Believe me when I tell you the pq is great. We also sell Sony, Hitachi, Panasonic, Toshiba, Samsung, Brillian and of course HP.

So I have seen them all.

Ok I lied Sony and Brillian have slight better pq but in a controlled enviroment you and at greater then 10feet you will not see the difference. Then take the money you saved on the HP and put that extra money into your Surround Sound System (SSS).

borromini
05-01-2006, 12:53 PM
60" if it's a TV, but with front projectors you definitely can go larger without impacting the space and more importantly increase the immersive experience RPTVs can't provide unless you sit significantly closer to the TV. Since you are "looking for the best possible Home Theater Experience", front projectors should be given serious consideration.

You'll also save money with the current crop of LCD/DLP 720p projectors that cost less than $4k not to mention eliminating viewing angle limitations from RPTVs.

hdtvpros.com
05-01-2006, 05:00 PM
60" if it's a TV, but with front projectors you definitely can go larger without impacting the space and more importantly increase the immersive experience RPTVs can't provide unless you sit significantly closer to the TV. Since you are "looking for the best possible Home Theater Experience", front projectors should be given serious consideration.

You'll also save money with the current crop of LCD/DLP 720p projectors that cost less than $4k not to mention eliminating viewing angle limitations from RPTVs.

Yes I understand what you are trying to say and he does too. But as his post states he only want about a 60" screen/TV.

borromini
05-01-2006, 05:50 PM
How do you know he understands me too. :) I understood it as 60" for a TV...it isn't clear to me that this applies to a front projector as well. Bottom line is with a projector, you apply a different set of rules for screen sizing than you would with TVs.

mfabien
05-12-2006, 05:36 AM
check this one out then DIGITAL CINEMA PROJECTOR SC-1 SIGNATURE CINEMA™ PORTFOLIO (http://www.runco.com/image/brochures/SC-1_2-06.pdf)
MSRP (USD) : $ 250,000 http://www.projectorcentral.com/Runco-Signature_Cinema_SC-1.htm
or the Runco Video Xtreme VX-80d Projector at only $90,000

The guy invests $ 250,000 and he doesn't have a digital input. If he buys an HD DVD or BR, he better pray that the film makers don't put the ICT Flag for viewing with Component...

borromini
05-12-2006, 02:26 PM
If he can afford a $250k projector, he can afford a $25k video processor unit that will accept the HDMI feeds from a BR or HD-DVD players.;)

mfabien
05-12-2006, 04:30 PM
If he can afford a $250k projector, he can afford a $25k video processor unit that will accept the HDMI feeds from a BR or HD-DVD players.;)

...just want to learn something here...

the $25k video processor receives as a compliant HDCP component in the circuit and then can transmit to a non compliant projector? Is that what you are saying?

borromini
05-12-2006, 05:02 PM
Yeah...I read about it in a magazine a while back. According to the reviewer, the video processor unit also had the most amazing scale-up chip(s) that took 480i/p signals and produced breathless HD images that you'd swear was authored in HD.

Guess there hasn't been any concern from Hollywood since the $25k component is considered "exotic" and only sells to a handful of rich folks that have $500k to $1 million home theaters.:)

zozu13
05-18-2006, 09:27 AM
I have a cheap Dell mp2300 DLP projector hooked up to a Comcast HD cable box :with a DIY 108 inch screen frmed in Black that BLOWS away my 55 inch Toshiba HD rear screen.
If lighting can be controlled, you will NEVER watch a HD sporting event again without the projector. Non HD channels are good, not as good as the scaled up output on my rear projector, but I am researching the purchase of a line doubler to bring all channels to HD or near HD.

If lighting cant be controlled all bets are off.

assmanfrom1973
05-22-2006, 10:59 PM
Speaking from experience I am now certain that a 57" cannot supply a home theater experience and I can safely assume that an extra 3" upgrade to a 60" wouldn't change anything.
Go with the front projector. A true movie experience means that you may have to use your eyes to scan around the screen when watching the movie at a theater, go big man. I enjoy my 57" and people comment on how its big enough, I thought so too until I had mine for about six months. I've watched movies on my friends cheap shitty front projector and the size ALMOST makes up for lack of quality in the Home Theater feeling/sense thing (I think he spent $1200, not enough for sure). Spending 3 times that amount probably would have made a world of a difference and the cost and quality would have been the same as my 57"
I can't stop thinking how nice a 120" screen would look at the front of my HT room, DAMMIT!!

borromini
05-23-2006, 04:14 PM
...(I think he spent $1200, not enough for sure). Spending 3 times that amount probably would have made a world of a difference and the cost and quality would have been the same as my 57"
I can't stop thinking how nice a 120" screen would look at the front of my HT room, DAMMIT!! Actually only another $800 would have been enough to get a nice LCD 720p projector.:)

Glen Carter
07-27-2006, 11:46 AM
Front projection is nice and I have a 110” screen with a Marquee 9500LC CRT. Picture is great, but viewing environment needs to be absolutely dark. With a budget of $10K, I would seriously consider a Brillian 6580iFB and a Lumagen HDQ processor. This TV has the best viewing image I have seen to date, under $10K. It is extremely bright and can be viewed in rooms with high ambient light and has very good black levels. However, as with all bulb type displays, black level is not suited for totally dark viewing. The Brillian includes ISF calibration ($400 standard cost). Besides the stunning picture, I like the Brillian because of the reduced SSE and white field uniformity over other consumer RPTVs.

The Sony “Ruby” VPL-VW100 SXRD projector has been liked for its image quality (good replacement for a 9” CRT), however bulb life seems to be around 1000-hours and costs $1000 or more. Then there is the cost of a good screen, the Stewart Studiotek 130 is the most recommended.

borromini
07-27-2006, 07:07 PM
Front projection is nice and I have a 110” screen with a Marquee 9500LC CRT. Picture is great, but viewing environment needs to be absolutely dark... "absolutely dark" is debatable as there are plenty of LCD HD models that work well with low to medium level ambient lighting and a screen with decent gain. The trick is getting the right balance of screen/projector to allow some ambient lighting without severely deteriorating image contrast. It just means doing some homework before deciding.

maicaw
07-27-2006, 07:58 PM
.... With a budget of $10K, I would seriously consider a Brillian 6580iFB and a Lumagen HDQ processor. This TV has the best viewing image I have seen to date, under $10K. It is extremely bright and can be viewed in rooms with high ambient light and has very good black levels. However, as with all bulb type displays, black level is not suited for totally dark viewing. The Brillian includes ISF calibration ($400 standard cost). Besides the stunning picture, I like the Brillian because of the reduced SSE and white field uniformity over other consumer RPTVs...]Flogging that set in 5 posts today - even tells you how to get one -
from him:D
Search: Key Word(s): brillian ;
Posts Made By: Glen Carter
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Replies: 6 65" RP LCoS TV made in USA
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They are sold through "Custom...
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Replies: 6 65" RP LCoS TV made in USA
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