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No 1080p input: So What?

netvizier
02-23-2006, 06:11 PM
I don't understand what the concern is with the various HDTVs (eg. SXRD) that can display 1080p but can only accept 1080i via HDMI, but not 1080p. This seems to me to be much ado about nothing.

First, let's be clear, when we talk about 1080i we really mean 1080i/60, that is 1080 lines interlaced at 60 frames per second. When we talk about 1080p we really mean 1080p/30, which is 1080 lines progressive at 30 frames per second. So, let's take a situation where you have some source material playing through some system that is capable of outputing both 1080p and 1080i. Now, consider that you have two identical HDTVs that can display 1080p, but one only accepts 1080i and the other 1080p.

In scenario 1, the source system outputs 1080p/30 to the 1080p/30 input on the HDTV and is displayed in 1080p/30.

In scenario 2, the source system outputs 1080i/60 to the 1080i/60 input on the HDTV which then de-interlaces the signal to display in 1080p/30.

In both scenarios, the picture is the same. The data is the same.

What is the concern?

Thanks,

nv

hdrichtv
02-24-2006, 06:41 AM
I think the fallacy in your argument is that you assume that the 1080p signal is at 30 frames/second. The 1080i signal being accepted at 60 frames/sec translates to 30 frames/sec progressive, but the 1080p signal being accepted at 60 frames/sec translates to 60 frames/sec progressive, which is a huge difference, and is why people will wait until they can get an HDTV with 1080p/60 throughput. Using your logic, a 720i signal is equal to a 720p signal. No way. Correct me if I'm wrong. These new HD DVD players may well deliver 1080p/60.

tuccillo
02-24-2006, 07:14 AM
If you are talking about a movie, arent they shot at 24 fps? If so, it appears to me that there is no additional information content if the HD DVD player outputs 1080p/60.

I think the fallacy in your argument is that you assume that the 1080p signal is at 30 frames/second. The 1080i signal being accepted at 60 frames/sec translates to 30 frames/sec progressive, but the 1080p signal being accepted at 60 frames/sec translates to 60 frames/sec progressive, which is a huge difference, and is why people will wait until they can get an HDTV with 1080p/60 throughput. Using your logic, a 720i signal is equal to a 720p signal. No way. Correct me if I'm wrong. These new HD DVD players may well deliver 1080p/60.

chooseyourtv
02-24-2006, 07:22 AM
Netvizier, 1080p is way better then 1080i. Not only are you mistaken about the frame rate but the simple fact of the difference between Interlace and progressive. First if the T.V. doesn't have 1080 horizontal lines then you are not getting a 1080i picture. A lot of TV's have a max res of 768 lines but claim they do 1080i. Really that picture is being down converted. Then if you have a 1080 line T.V. when it's showing a 1080i picture you are getting 540 lines showing you a picture and 540 lines moving. So they picture is not as high quality as a 1080 line picture. If you really saw a 1080p picture on new TV's and compared them with a 1080i side by side. You would see a big difference.

chooseyourtv
02-24-2006, 07:35 AM
If you are talking about a movie, arent they shot at 24 fps? If so, it appears to me that there is no additional information content if the HD DVD player outputs 1080p/60.


You are touching some on one of the most debated topics. Yes Movie theaters display 24 fps, because each still image is flashed before our eyes. When they move the movie to DVD we see it in 30 fps. As movies are shot with new camera equipment, that equipment has the ability to shoot 60 fps. From what I have see, media that is 1080p is 60 fps. DVD's is 30 fps and your movie theater is 24 fps.

hdrichtv
02-24-2006, 07:53 AM
All I know is the Holy Grail is 1080p/60, from source to display; that will produce the smoothest motion, the best picture quality, and that's where the technology is headed.

inazsully
02-24-2006, 11:04 AM
The HP 1080p accepts a 1080p signal and has been on the market for several months now. So, has anybody fed this set a 1080p signal and how does the end result compare to to say a SXRD rendition of the same signal? Proofs in the pudding.