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Netflix's Reed Hastings' 11-page manifesto

morriscroy
04-26-2013, 10:25 AM
Heh.

A long rambling essay by Reed Hastings, on the future.

http://files.shareholder.com/downloads/NFLX/2445649448x0x656145/e4410bd8-e5d4-4d31-ad79-84c36c49f77c/IROverviewHomePageLetter_4.24.13_pdf.pdf

Dunno whether to laugh or cry. :haha:

morriscroy
04-26-2013, 10:37 AM
The closest to fighting words, is the statement:


7
Streaming 4k video will happen long before linear TV supports 4k video;


Hopefully this won't be "prophetic". :rolleyes:

It would be a travesty if Netflix ends up becoming the de facto industry standard for 4K video.

GLOW
04-27-2013, 04:05 PM
The closest to fighting words, is the statement:



Hopefully this won't be "prophetic". :rolleyes:

It would be a travesty if Netflix ends up becoming the de facto industry standard for 4K video.

Netflix has a hard enough time doing 1080p, sometimes it even struggles to get an HD res period. Also, I thought 4k BDs were on the way. :confused:

Echo13
04-27-2013, 07:39 PM
Youtube has supported 4K video for over 2 years now.

HD Goofnut
04-27-2013, 08:20 PM
Youtube has supported 4K video for over 2 years now.

Have you seen their 1080p videos? They leave quite a bit to be desired. Here's one of my 1080p videos taken straight from the BD. Click on the YT link in the bottom right hand corner of the video to go to the page and change it to 1080p. There's so much compression going on it's not even funny.

nRgXToKyq5o

GLOW
04-28-2013, 09:25 AM
Youtube has supported 4K video for over 2 years now.


:lol: do you know what the bandwidth is on that? :lol:

morriscroy
05-08-2013, 10:17 AM
In light of some old articles about Blockbuster's poor relations with Hollywood movie companies back in the late 1990's

http://www.highdefforum.com/1314323-post37.html

I wonder if Netflix producing their own new original content, is a way of preemptively minimizing a possible future Blockbuster-style bad blood fallout with the movie companies.

If Netflix wasn't producing their own new content, in principle it would be completely vulnerable to the movie studios ganging up and destroying Netflix. (Similar to how the movie companies were looking to destroy Blockbuster a decade ago).

EDIT: By producing their own new original content and creating their own catalog, Netflix in principle can make itself less dependent on the existing movie companies.

morriscroy
05-08-2013, 12:18 PM
I wouldn't be surprised if Reed Hastings' end game, is for Netflix to be a legitimate producer and big player in Hollywood, such that Netflix is completely independent of the existing incumbent system of movie companies, while beating them at their own game and changing it forever.

Possibly Reed Hastings' covert way of giving the middle finger to the incumbent system of movie companies. :what:

morriscroy
05-09-2013, 07:24 PM
Article asserts Netflix gobbles up around one-third of the internet's bandwidth, and is highly dependent on Amazon's cloud infrastructure services.

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-05-09/netflix-reed-hastings-survive-missteps-to-join-silicon-valleys-elite

Ray Von Geezer
05-10-2013, 05:11 AM
Article asserts Netflix gobbles up around one-third of the internet's bandwidthIt actually says Netflix accounts for a third of all traffic, that's a subtle but very important difference.

Still, an interesting article, cheers :)

Ray Von

morriscroy
05-10-2013, 05:47 AM
It actually says Netflix accounts for a third of all traffic, that's a subtle but very important difference.

The use of the word "third" is ambiguous in that article. (Whether this was done deliberately or not).

They should have written it out numerically to be precise.

In the first sentence, it is written as:

"On a normal weeknight, Netflix (NFLX) accounts for almost a third of all Internet traffic entering North American homes. "


From grade school math, I always thought context of the word "of" means a multiplication.

A dictionary definition of "third" is:

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/third?s=t


third
[thurd] Show IPA

adjective
1.
next after the second; being the ordinal number for three.
2.
being one of three equal parts.
3.
Automotive. of, pertaining to, or operating at the gear transmission ratio at which the drive shaft speed is greater than that of second gear for a given engine crankshaft speed, but not as great as that of fourth gear, if such exists: third gear.
4.
rated, graded, or ranked one level below the second: He's third engineer on the ship.

noun
5.
a third part, especially of one ( 1 / 3 ).
6.
the third member of a series.
7.
Automotive. third gear: Don't try to start a car when it's in third.
8.
a person or thing next after second in rank, precedence, order: The writer of the best essay will receive a gold medal, the second a silver, and the third a bronze.
9.
Usually, thirds. Law.
a.
the third part of the personal property of a deceased husband, which in certain circumstances goes absolutely to the widow.
b.
a widow's dower.


Hence the words "third of all Internet traffic" using possible above definitions in context, implied the numerical operation (1/3) * (all internet traffic).

If the sentence was meant to be something else using the word "third", then the editor should have used different wording.

Ray Von Geezer
05-10-2013, 12:08 PM
The use of the word "third" is ambiguous in that article. (Whether this was done deliberately or not).

They should have written it out numerically to be precise.

In the first sentence, it is written as:

"On a normal weeknight, Netflix (NFLX) accounts for almost a third of all Internet traffic entering North American homes. "


From grade school math, I always thought context of the word "of" means a multiplication.

.....

Hence the words "third of all Internet traffic" using possible above definitions in context, implied the numerical operation (1/3) * (all internet traffic).

If the sentence was meant to be something else using the word "third", then the editor should have used different wording.That's not what I'm talking about, it's your use of "internet's bandwidth" vs what the author actually said ("internet traffic").

In networking, bandwidth is a measure of available capacity, traffic is a measure of how much of available capacity is utilised.

If I have a 10Gb/s network, a third of bandwidth is ~3.3Gb/s, but traffic might only be 3Gb/s, and a third of that is only 1Gb/s, or 10% of bandwidth.

The reason I say it's a subtle but important difference is that saying "around one-third of the internet's bandwidth" implies that any sizeable increase in usage would impact on overall capacity, and there's no way to gauge that since the article only talks about traffic and we don't know how much traffic there is.

Ray Von