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Nielsen to begin counting broadband viewing homes

Malanthius
02-21-2013, 11:49 AM
NEW YORK (AP) The company that measures television viewership will soon begin counting people who watch programming through broadband instead of a traditional broadcast or cable hook-up.

The move announced Thursday by Nielsen is a significant step toward recognizing a world where the definition of TV viewing is swiftly changing. For many years, roughly 99 percent of homes in the U.S. had televisions that received service through broadcast, cable or satellite signals.

Now the number of homes without such service is 4.2 percent and growing each year. Most of those homes have TVs, however, and their owners watch programming through game consoles or services like Netflix and Amazon. Starting September, Nielsen will begin tracking the habits of these homes.

http://movies.yahoo.com/news/nielsen-begin-counting-broadband-viewing-homes-165248375.html

Should be interesting to see the results!

bruceames
02-21-2013, 12:01 PM
It's inevitable that streaming will include stuff like sports, news, and even cable channels like TNT. It's just a cheaper method of delivery and has shown that it's hurting the cable/sat industry far more than OD. And it's not just loss of subs, but loss of pay TV channels as well (http://www.homemediamagazine.com/netflix/survey-nearly-quarter-netflix-subs-cancel-pay-tv-service-29671). Why would anyone pay to watch movies on HBO or Showtime anymore if they have streaming? The only thing keep those channels going are the TV exclusives, and Netflix is starting to play that game as well.

So streaming is just like regular TV and will be more so as time goes on. The nice thing about streaming sports would be that you don't have to remember to record it on your DVR if your not at home.

morriscroy
02-21-2013, 12:58 PM
Wonder if Nielsen will continue using the personal viewer diary system, for measuring broadband viewing.

RBTO
02-22-2013, 10:21 AM
Some independent group needs to do a study on Nielsen to see if their methods are valid. With all the means to get programing now, and the relatively small sample they use, I wouldn't be surprised that they need to change their methodology to get accurate information. I haven't had the opportunity to provide input on a Nielsen rating myself in well over 30 years???? About time they include the broadband group (does the include satellite?)

HiDefRev
02-22-2013, 07:01 PM
Indeed. I think it's about time Neilsen did this. It certainly won't hurt to show how many people are "cutting the cable" with the satellite and cable companies.

morriscroy
03-11-2013, 01:33 PM
Some recent Nielsen data asserts "zero tv" households consists of 5% of the market. (ie. Households who no longer watch traditional television offered by cable or satellite providers, but who tend to stream video online, via computers, smartphones or tablets).

http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/newswire/2013/zero-tv-doesnt-mean-zero-video.html
http://techcrunch.com/2013/03/11/zero-tv-households-now-at-5-million-says-nielsen-up-from-3-million-in-2007-but-still-just-5-of-market/

HD Goofnut
03-11-2013, 02:07 PM
Some recent Nielsen data asserts "zero tv" households consists of 5% of the market. (ie. Households who no longer watch traditional television offered by cable or satellite providers, but who tend to stream video online, via computers, smartphones or tablets).

http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/newswire/2013/zero-tv-doesnt-mean-zero-video.html
http://techcrunch.com/2013/03/11/zero-tv-households-now-at-5-million-says-nielsen-up-from-3-million-in-2007-but-still-just-5-of-market/

A whopping 5% and streaming has been easily accessible for about 4-5 years now. BD has been around for about 7 years and is in about 30-40% of households. That tells me right there that Neflix jumped the gun for sure in shunning the disc subscribers, but of course most of you recognized this when it happened as well.

Malanthius
03-11-2013, 04:56 PM
A whopping 5% and streaming has been easily accessible for about 4-5 years now. BD has been around for about 7 years and is in about 30-40% of households. That tells me right there that Neflix jumped the gun for sure in shunning the disc subscribers, but of course most of you recognized this when it happened as well.

Yes because Streaming was so familiar with consumers like Bluray was with DVD. :rolleyes: Bluray is going to max out at less than 3 billion in sales. Compared to DVD and VHS that really sucks. :hithere:

If you want to compare the two it's probably going to end up like this.
Hare and the Tortoise.
Bluray =Hare.
Streaming=Tortoise.

HD Goofnut
03-11-2013, 06:54 PM
Yes because Streaming was so familiar with consumers like Bluray was with DVD. :rolleyes: Bluray is going to max out at less than 3 billion in sales. Compared to DVD and VHS that really sucks. :hithere:

If you want to compare the two it's probably going to end up like this.
Hare and the Tortoise.
Bluray =Hare.
Streaming=Tortoise.

You know what they say about the word assume.;)

morriscroy
03-12-2013, 08:59 AM
(Another monkey wrench thrown in the mix).

http://www.deadline.com/2013/03/tv-advertising-weakness-economy-internet-analyst-report/#more-450811


The analysis today from Nomura Equity Research’s Michael Nathanson could dampen the mood at TV networks as we head into the big upfront ad sales season. The most startling discovery: total ad revenues didn’t grow at all in 2012 at the Big Media companies he tracks. Declines at Viacom and News Corp outweighed gains at Discovery and Scripps Networks while sales were “essentially flat” at CBS, Disney, and Time Warner. “Given the surge in media stocks, the aggregate 0% growth was somewhat surprising,” Nathanson says. Factoring out political and Olympics-related ads in 2012, he sees ad sales at the companies growing 3.6% in 2013. But the analyst is “cautious” about his forecast. The pickup in the U.S. economy has been “weak” and the ongoing budget stalemates portend “an uncertain economic future.”

Meanwhile Internet-based media are taking market share, and driving ad rates down. “In effect, online advertising — specifically online display advertising — is enabling advertisers to reach their ‘eye-ball targets’ with less (and sometimes even no) ad dollar budget growth.” For example, last year media and entertainment companies cut their ad spending 4.2% — even as box office sales hit a record high. Nathanson also warns that auto companies won’t increase ad spending as much as they did last year as they tried to make up ground they lost during the recession.

With ad growth slowing, Big Media likely will feel more pressure to raise the prices they charge pay TV distributors — putting pressure on them to raise subscribers’ monthly bills. Once CBS separates its billboard business, and News Corp and Time Warner spin off their publishing operations, ad sales will account for just 27.4% of all revenues at the companies Nathanson covers, down from 30.6% last year.


If this scenario pans out, wonder if this will lead to more "cord cutting" from higher cable/satellite bills.

HD Goofnut
03-12-2013, 09:49 AM
(Another monkey wrench thrown in the mix).

http://www.deadline.com/2013/03/tv-advertising-weakness-economy-internet-analyst-report/#more-450811



If this scenario pans out, wonder if this will lead to more "cord cutting" from higher cable/satellite bills.

My second 2 year contract with DirecTV ends next month. I'm going to talk them down or I am cutting the cord again.

Malanthius
03-16-2013, 10:57 AM
My second 2 year contract with DirecTV ends next month. I'm going to talk them down or I am cutting the cord again.

We have already cut back on all our premium channels. Most of the stuff we watch in our household is online or on disc. And with disc we either rent, wait till the price is dirt cheap or have it already. Amazon Prime, Netflix and my Plex server are used the most.

HD Goofnut
03-16-2013, 10:52 PM
We have already cut back on all our premium channels. Most of the stuff we watch in our household is online or on disc. And with disc we either rent, wait till the price is dirt cheap or have it already. Amazon Prime, Netflix and my Plex server are used the most.

The problem is my wife has a boat load of reality shows (crap in my book) that she likes to watch. The only shows I watch anymore are Swamp People and The Walking Dead.

morriscroy
03-17-2013, 08:01 AM
The problem is my wife has a boat load of reality shows (crap in my book) that she likes to watch.

Similar reasons why I still have cable.

For my partial contribution to the monthly cable bill, it goes into playing CNN (or MSNBC, FOX, BBC, etc ...) in the background while I'm at home. (I telecommute several days a week). Occasionally watch scifi type movies on other cable channels.

Most other stuff I watch regularly, is on ota network channels. (Such as some crime procedurals).


If my SO didn't watch any reality shows or sports, I wouldn't have cable at all.

morriscroy
03-18-2013, 11:02 AM
Wonder if this is the cable industry's response to competition from streaming providers.

http://online.wsj.com/article_email/SB10001424127887324392804578362943263175884-lMyQjAxMTAzMDEwNzExNDcyWj.html
http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57574848-93/verizon-looks-to-turn-tv-fee-rules-on-their-head/


Under existing arrangements, distributors like cable and satellite operators pay a monthly, per-subscriber fee to carry channels based on the number of homes in which they agree to make the channels available, regardless of how many people watch those channels.

"We are paying for a customer who never goes to the channel," Mr. Denson said.

Instead, Verizon would like to offer broad distribution of a "significant number of channels," including independent networks and smaller outlets. But each channel would be paid solely according to how many subscribers tuned in each month for a "unique view," or a minimum of five minutes, Mr. Denson said. Viewership would be measured by Verizon's set-top box data, not Nielsen ratings.

"If you are willing to give a channel five minutes of your time, the cash register would ring in favor of the programmer," Mr. Denson said. For smaller and independent channels that often aren't widely distributed, he said, this model would provide much broader exposure.


Perhaps this is their attempt at "killing two birds with one stone": responding to streaming competition and giving the middle finger to Nielsen.

Malanthius
03-18-2013, 04:19 PM
The problem is my wife has a boat load of reality shows (crap in my book) that she likes to watch. The only shows I watch anymore are Swamp People and The Walking Dead.

I don't know how you can watch Swamp People. But Walking dead is awesome isn't it? Best show on TV. Can't wait to see the governor get his!

HD Goofnut
03-18-2013, 05:01 PM
I don't know how you can watch Swamp People. But Walking dead is awesome isn't it? Best show on TV. Can't wait to see the governor get his!

I'm from Mississippi so that should tell you why I love it.

morriscroy
03-18-2013, 05:42 PM
But Walking dead is awesome isn't it? Best show on TV.

I tried watching a few episodes of Walking Dead. I wasn't really into it at first.

Though I may examine it again, at a later time.


Can't wait to see the governor get his!

What kinda of serialized show would Ahnold be a good fit in?

(ie. Besides making Expendables into a tv series).

morriscroy
05-07-2013, 11:05 PM
http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/nielsen-us-household-number-estimate-increase-1200471668/

Nielsen has reversed a two-year slide in the number of U.S. TV homes in which it tracks TV ratings thanks to a little help from a new calculus that takes into account broadband-connected TVs.

Heh.

Viewers were there all along, but were not "counted" previously? :haha: