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Wireless Speakers

poboxjosh
11-03-2005, 11:25 PM
Im looking to get some wireless speakers. Does anybody know anything about them how they work? If they are any good?

brax4
11-04-2005, 08:32 AM
Well it all depends on what you are using them for, surround sound, outdoor, just music in another room, etc.... Not knowing your setup and needs I'll try and cover a broad range. Basically you will have a transmitter from your source and then a receiver/amplifier in the location where the speakers are. Now the receiver/amplifier portion may be built in to the speakers themselves. What you are going to what to look for is whether the wireless speakers are IR (inferred) or RF (radio frequency). IR means that they will need a line of sight from the transmitter to the receiver, like your TV remote. You have to point your TV remote at your TV to control it. This is obviously the cheaper way to do it and most of the IR systems are not even being built anymore. Now with RF there will be 3 different types that you will need to consider: 900MHz, 2.4Ghz, or 5.8Ghz. The most common here will be the 900Mhz ones. I would suggest choosing a system keeping in mind of what your cordless phones and or wireless home network are running on. In other words if you have a 5.8Ghz cordless phone and are using 2.4Ghz home network then I would choose a 900Mhz version. The reason is that once you get multiple things in your house on the same frequency they can affect other devices on that same frequency. For example we had 2.4Ghz cordless phones and then I got a wireless router that was also on the same 2.4Ghz frequency. Every time I was on my laptop and received a call I would lose my wireless connection for my laptop. I swapped out our phone for 5.8Ghz and no more problem. Now most systems will have a couple of different "channels" you can select to help with any interference, but I have found that this are hit or miss and best to just try and use things on different frequencies. The different frequencies will also play a role in transmission distance, 5.8Ghz will go farther then 2.4Ghz and 900Mhz, etc..

Now there are some systems out there like the RCA RC970 that use your existing outlet wiring to transmit the audio, they are still considered wireless and operate on a frequency band. The RCA ones use the 900Mhz frequency band. These types of systems normally do not interfere with any other existing devices that are on the same frequency, because the signal is carried over the electrical wiring. But they do require you to plug them in to an outlet.

Trade offs for using a wireless system is that the output is not that great, normally only about 10-25watts. Kenwood does have a transmitter and receiver/amplifier that does 50watts a channel, but you still would have to supply the speakers. This is the highest output that I have seen on a wireless setup that was not a complete home theater system. There are some home theater systems out there that incorporate a wireless setup for the rear speakers that will do 100+watts, if that is mainly what you are looking for.

Main thing is what are you planning on using them for?

unkster
11-04-2005, 06:12 PM
Check out the Pioneer XWHT1 wireless rear surround speaker(s). I have it and it works excellent...................

poboxjosh
11-05-2005, 03:18 PM
Check out the Pioneer XWHT1 wireless rear surround speaker(s). I have it and it works excellent...................


i could deal with just having the rear speakers wireless i just bought a new house and its not convenient to run these wires everywhere. I can keep the main speaker wires hidden, it was the surrounds that i would have the problems with.

unkster
11-06-2005, 08:32 AM
Just so you know, you do need a 115v outlet to power the speaker. I wall hung mine, and hid the wire with plastic self-adhesive wiremold.

poboxjosh
11-07-2005, 05:08 PM
Just so you know, you do need a 115v outlet to power the speaker. I wall hung mine, and hid the wire with plastic self-adhesive wiremold.


115v?

rbinck
11-07-2005, 05:23 PM
115v = old school 120v.

unkster
11-08-2005, 07:11 PM
115-120 volt a/c outlet to power the rear speaker. The speaker is controled by a small reciever/transmitter via a wireless remote, which has all the functions. It's really a neat little unit that looks and sounds great. The surround sound is very effective, and has three different modes in both TV, DVD, & CD modes, with a seperate volume control for the rear speaker. Check it out