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Wal-Mart set to join UltraViolet digital movie group

mikemorel
03-06-2012, 06:25 PM
Wal-Mart set to join UltraViolet digital movie group (http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/entertainmentnewsbuzz/2012/03/wal-mart-set-to-join-ultraviolet-digital-movie-group.html)

Retail giant Wal-Mart will announce its support for Hollywood's UltraViolet digital movie technology at a media event to be held in Los Angeles next Tuesday, according to several people familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak publicly.

As the nation's biggest seller of DVDs — responsible for up to 40% of all DVD sales in the U.S. — Wal-Mart's support could provide a critical boost to UltraViolet, which had a troubled launch last fall. The technology, which is backed by five of Hollywood's six major studios and dozens of electronics manufacturers, lets consumers store copies of movies they buy in the online cloud, which they can then access on any compatible digital device.

Wal-Mart will sell Ultraviolet-enabled copies of movies through Vudu, the online video service that it acquired in 2010. In addition, consumers will be able to bring copies of DVDs they own into stores. For a small but not yet determined fee, Wal-Mart employees will give those customers a copy of the movie in their UltraViolet account.

That option, which Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group President Kevin Tsujihara called "disc-to-digital" at an investor event last week, will be critical to boosting use of UltraViolet. Thus far, the only compatible movies have been certain ones that have been launched on DVD since October.

Technological glitches and a cumbersome registration process generated negative consumer reactions when Ultraviolet debuted. Tsujihara said last week, "The launch wasn't perfect, I'll be the first one to admit it," adding that it was important to get the years-in-the-works technology rolled out sooner, rather than waiting to perfect it.

Tsujihara and other Hollywood executives have said it is critical for Ultraviolet to succeed in order to turn around ongoing declines in home entertainment revenue. While online movie rentals are increasingly popular, online movie sales are not. Studios make a much larger profit from sales than rentals.

Once Wal-Mart begins supporting UltraViolet aggressively, it's likely that other retailers such as Best Buy will follow. Amazon.com, the largest online DVD retailer, in January announced a deal giving it the rights to sell Ultraviolet digital copies, but it has yet to start offering the service.

All of Hollywood's top movie studios save for Walt Disney Studios are behind UltraViolet, but the dominant seller of digital movies, Apple's iTunes, is not involved. The iPhone and iPad maker is developing its own service to store movies in the virtual cloud, people familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak publicly have said.

News of Wal-Mart's plans to convert DVDs into Ultraviolet copies was first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

mikemorel
03-06-2012, 06:45 PM
Can Wal-Mart Save UltraViolet? (http://paidcontent.org/article/419-can-wal-mart-save-ultraviolet/)

Hollywood’s Ultraviolet cloud initiative has registered only 1 million users to date and has been dogged by complaints that its technology is too cumbersome for consumers. Next week, the five major studios behind Ultraviolet will hold a press conference with Wal-Mart (NYSE: WMT) to detail their new partnership. Is this the lifeline the struggling movie-cloud venture has been looking for?

On Tuesday in Los Angeles Wal-Mart is expected to announce details about how it will serve UltraViolet and provide with the retail partnership it can’t live without. Backed by five of Hollywood’s six major studios—Disney (NYSE: DIS) remains the only holdout—UltraViolet was launched in October with hopes that would entice consumers away from low-margin rental streaming of movies and TV shows, as well as illegal torrenting, through a system of cloud-based distribution of digital entertainment. The essential pitch: buy a DVD, Blu-ray or electronic sell-through title from a participating major studio, and play it on up to 12 devices and share it with your family.

At the Consumer Electronics Show in January, Amazon (NSDQ: AMZN) announced UltraViolet retail support for Warner Bros. (NYSE: TWX) releases. But to date, the initiative has lacked a crucial retail touchpoint serving all the participating studios—a much-needed brick-and-mortar destination that can walk consumers through the tedium of cloud sign-up and solve a range of other problems. The Wall Street Journal reported last week that Wal-Mart was in talks to establish such a location within the photo-printing area of most, if not all, of its U.S. stores. The Journal also said that Wal-Mart will kick in much-needed retail promotional support in the form of a $30 million marketing campaign. Wal-Mart is also expected to provide details on how authentication of current disc libraries will be handled through UltraViolet.

At CES, Samsung showed off several new Blu-ray players with a “Disc to Digital” feature that would upload consumers’ existing DVD and Blu-ray titles to the UltraViolet cloud for a nominal fee. However, it’s believed that Wal-Mart will announce a service whereby legacy disc titles will have to be authenticated through its stores in order to be uploaded to the cloud. A Samsung representative did not respond to inquiries as to how the Disc to Digital would work with such a retail scheme.

Also expected to be announced: the inclusion of Wal-Mart’s Vudu online movie download and rental service into the UltraViolet portfolio. To date, UltraViolet has lacked a partner with the technological infrastructure to sell and serve movies to a wide range of devices. Vudu, the nation’s No. 3 online movie service, has app that plays on most devices and could solve many of those issues.

Kosty
03-06-2012, 07:12 PM
Merging the infrastructure of Vudu and the prominence, reach and marketing of Walmart with UltraViolet is a very good thing.

Makes perfect sense to me.

PSound
03-06-2012, 09:26 PM
Vudu is the big deal here.

Nice to finally have UltraViolet on a quality EST / Streaming offering.

GizmoDVD
03-06-2012, 10:39 PM
So will Vudu stream UV copies from Blu-rays? That would be great.

PSound
03-06-2012, 11:39 PM
So will Vudu stream UV copies from Blu-rays? That would be great.

That should be the end goal.

To have a good streaming service behind however you obtain an UltraViolet license, vs getting stuck with the studio backed stream that may not be available on devices (or have a crappy stream).

DonnyDC
03-07-2012, 12:09 AM
In addition, consumers will be able to bring copies of DVDs they own into stores. For a small but not yet determined fee, Wal-Mart employees will give those customers a copy of the movie in their UltraViolet account.I wish they did this for blu rays.
And no, '$5 off MSRP when you trade in the DVD' doesnt count. But I guess a UV copy is a tougher sell.

Kosty
03-07-2012, 12:55 AM
So will Vudu stream UV copies from Blu-rays? That would be great.

I hope so. That would be great.

Kosty
03-07-2012, 12:56 AM
That should be the end goal.

To have a good streaming service behind however you obtain an UltraViolet license, vs getting stuck with the studio backed stream that may not be available on devices (or have a crappy stream).

I fully agree with you here.

A common platform also would ensure your cloud based stuff would be around in the future as well.

Chris Gerhard
03-07-2012, 04:35 AM
I have still never streamed or played UltraViolet but I do use Vudu and don't have an understanding of why any of this should matter to me. I like Vudu just fine but will never stream a movie I own on Blu-ray or DVD, instead will just play the disc as I always have. It seems like a waste of bandwidth to stream movies I own on disc from the internet. If you sell the disc can you still stream the movie?

bruceames
03-07-2012, 09:52 AM
I have still never streamed or played UltraViolet but I do use Vudu and don't have an understanding of why any of this should matter to me. I like Vudu just fine but will never stream a movie I own on Blu-ray or DVD, instead will just play the disc as I always have. It seems like a waste of bandwidth to stream movies I own on disc from the internet. If you sell the disc can you still stream the movie?

I agree, and in my case the quality would be worse than DVD because I don't have a lot of bandwidth to begin with (Comcast). Of course it would never compare with Blu-ray.

I think the studios are overestimating the desire for consumers to watch full length movies on their portable devices. I can see it for airport layovers, or being stuck somewhere where there's no TV and a lot of time on your hands, but how often is that going to happen? Business travelers can watch a movie on the airplane, or in a hotel room, I don't know. But for home viewing, it's better to just watch the digital copy or the disc itself.

Good question on if UV rights are transferable. I don't know the answer to that. If not, and you sell just the disc, you should not lose the right to the UV copy since you paid for it.

PSound
03-07-2012, 09:57 AM
I agree, and in my case the quality would be worse than DVD because I don't have a lot of bandwidth to begin with (Comcast). Of course it would never compare with Blu-ray.

I think the studios are overestimating the desire for consumers to watch full length movies on their portable devices. I can see it for airport layovers, or being stuck somewhere where there's no TV and a lot of time on your hands, but how often is that going to happen? Business travelers can watch a movie on the airplane, or in a hotel room, I don't know. But for home viewing, it's better to just watch the digital copy or the disc itself.

Good question on if UV rights are transferable. I don't know the answer to that. If not, and you sell just the disc, you should not lose the right to the UV copy since you paid for it.

We have talked about this before, but it is all about adding value to ownership.

For me, there is value in having my library with me wherever I am. That includes being able to hook up my iPad to a TV at a rental condo, hotel or even at a friends house.

I am far more likely to purchase a title (vs rent) if I know I will forever have access to it wherever I am.

bruceames
03-07-2012, 10:13 AM
We have talked about this before, but it is all about adding value to ownership.

For me, there is value in having my library with me wherever I am. That includes being able to hook up my iPad to a TV at a rental condo, hotel or even at a friends house.

I am far more likely to purchase a title (vs rent) if I know I will forever have access to it wherever I am.

I can see it adding value on the level of another special feature, but as special features go, not many people watch them. Watching movies on the go is not something people do a lot of, and those that do would probably prefer the digital copy anyway.

UV's future seems to be limited to adding value and extending the life of OD, rather than generating any appreciable revenue on its own. Reminds me of another format.

Kosty
03-07-2012, 11:41 AM
I can see it adding value on the level of another special feature, but as special features go, not many people watch them. Watching movies on the go is not something people do a lot of, and those that do would probably prefer the digital copy anyway.

UV's future seems to be limited to adding value and extending the life of OD, rather than generating any appreciable revenue on its own. Reminds me of another format.

At CES 2012 both the CEA and NPD had a lot of data that a lot of tablet usage, mostly television, was used not on the road but actually done in the home. Younger users especially were using the small screens to watch mostly short form content like TV show episodes around the house, in the bedroom and while multi tasking activities in the home.

How you can text, tweet, watch a TV show episode, do a You Tube video and play a game all at the same time on a smart phone or tablet is kinda beyond my personal capability but its being done.

Longer form content like theatrical movies still tends to be watched on the larger displays in the house but even then more and more people are mutitasking with second screens even then when they are watching the movie. That's why Disney and others are doing second screen applications so you can look up stuff on your iPad or smartphone on the web while watching the content on your larger screen on the Blu-ray Disc.

But for some family members that trend younger if you are used to using your tablet or smartphone all the time anyway having access to your families DVD collection when you want it on demand no matter what corner of the house you are at could also be appealing I guess. Not my preference, but I'm older than that to understand the urges of the younger generation. For me its a waste watching theatrical movies on a portable device unless I'm traveling. Even then I find more and more I can get an HDMI input on my hotel TV if I want to watch something off the web off my laptop.

Chris Gerhard
03-07-2012, 12:07 PM
I watch movies on the go, car DVD player or portable player but never, ever, not even one time have I watched a movie I own on Blu-ray using a portable player. I will just wait and watch that movie in HD on an HDTV. So much discussion about getting digital copies or UV copies or DVD copies of movies consumers buy on Blu-ray and it isn't even a feature that matters at all to me. I couldn't even place it in the top 1 million items I would want, it probably falls outside the top 1 billion but so much effort continues to be made to meet consumer's demand of that product.

Maybe the next time I see someone watching a movie on a 7" or 10" tablet or iPhone I will ask them if they own that movie on Blu-ray and if the answer is yes, I will ask them why in the world are you watching the movie on that piece of shit?

My children or grandchildren also don't need to watch digital copies of movies I own on Blu-ray, they can watch other programs not owned on Blu-ray, on portable players and watch anything owned on Blu-ray using a Blu-ray player and an HDTV. It is still the stupidest concept I see discussed at various forums, all of the fuss about digital copies, what an absurd worthless added value.

Kosty
03-07-2012, 12:52 PM
I watch movies on the go, car DVD player or portable player but never, ever, not even one time have I watched a movie I own on Blu-ray using a portable player. I will just wait and watch that movie in HD on an HDTV. So much discussion about getting digital copies or UV copies or DVD copies of movies consumers buy on Blu-ray and it isn't even a feature that matters at all to me. I couldn't even place it in the top 1 million items I would want, it probably falls outside the top 1 billion but so much effort continues to be made to meet consumer's demand of that product.

Maybe the next time I see someone watching a movie on a 7" or 10" tablet or iPhone I will ask them if they own that movie on Blu-ray and if the answer is yes, I will ask them why in the world are you watching the movie on that piece of shit?

My children or grandchildren also don't need to watch digital copies of movies I own on Blu-ray, they can watch other programs not owned on Blu-ray, on portable players and watch anything owned on Blu-ray using a Blu-ray player and an HDTV. It is still the stupidest concept I see discussed at various forums, all of the fuss about digital copies, what an absurd worthless added value.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=wKiIroiCvZ0

PSound
03-07-2012, 02:32 PM
I can see it adding value on the level of another special feature, but as special features go, not many people watch them. Watching movies on the go is not something people do a lot of, and those that do would probably prefer the digital copy anyway.

UV's future seems to be limited to adding value and extending the life of OD, rather than generating any appreciable revenue on its own. Reminds me of another format.

I think it is well understood that the audience here is the exception rather than the norm.

I can say from my discussions that having your entire library wherever you are is viewed as a big plus.

People want their content with them and for it to "just work". No downloading beforehand... no knowing what device it is on (and which it isn't)... no packing and/or moving a bunch of discs. Simply browsing their library and hitting play.

Kosty
03-07-2012, 07:13 PM
I think it is well understood that the audience here is the exception rather than the norm.

I can say from my discussions that having your entire library wherever you are is viewed as a big plus.

People want their content with them and for it to "just work". No downloading beforehand... no knowing what device it is on (and which it isn't)... no packing and/or moving a bunch of discs. Simply browsing their library and hitting play.

You are just so right on that point.

None of use home theater or movie enthusiasts or classic home collectors are normal consumers.

Its tough sometimes to let our personal preferences bias our perspective of other consumers in the market.

mikemorel
03-13-2012, 11:49 AM
Wal-Mart Tests Hollywood’s Cloud-Seeding Plan to Sell More Films (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-03-13/wal-mart-tests-hollywood-s-cloud-seeding-plan-to-sell-more-films.html)

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. (WMT), the nation’s largest retailer, backed a Hollywood-led plan that aims to counter online rental and subscription services by letting consumers buy, store and stream movies on the Internet.

Wal-Mart will become the first major retailer to offer a service that lets consumers bring their DVDs and Blu-ray discs into its stores and convert them into online copies, the Bentonville, Arkansas-company said today in Los Angeles. The service plan starts on April 16 in 3,500 stores.

Support from Wal-Mart, the biggest DVD seller, is a major step in Hollywood’s strategy to reignite home-video purchases through a system called UltraViolet, which allows users to store movies they own online and access them through multiple formats. DVD sales, traditionally the most profitable business at film studios, have shrunk for years as customers embraced less costly services like Netflix Inc. (NFLX), cable pay-per-view and Apple Inc. (AAPL)’s iTunes.

Wal-Mart is supporting disc-to-digital, a component of UltraViolet that aims to seed consumers’ cloud collections of movies with titles they already own. The company plans to charge $2 per disc, or $5 to upgrade to a high-definition copy. Consumers will be able to access those digital copies through Wal-Mart’s online movie service, Vudu.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 11:57 AM
Wal-Mart Tests Hollywood’s Cloud-Seeding Plan to Sell More Films (http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-03-13/wal-mart-tests-hollywood-s-cloud-seeding-plan-to-sell-more-films.html)

Wow. So the initial reports of $2-4 were wrong...its $2-5 dollars!

lol.

"nominal" fee indeed.

No freebies?

So - raise your hand if you are taking them up on their offer...

Kosty
03-13-2012, 12:02 PM
Wal-Mart Tests Hollywood’s Cloud-Seeding Plan to Sell More Films (http://wwwme.bloomberg.com/news/2012-03-13/wal-mart-tests-hollywood-s-cloud-seeding-plan-to-sell-more-films.html)

$5 to upgrade to HD copy on Vudu for a DVD you own not available on Blu-ray could appeal to me for some titles.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:06 PM
Walmart has a nice little video:

http://walmartstores.com/pressroom/news/10824.aspx

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:07 PM
Some good news - the $2 fee is flat for DVD or bluray.

Pay $2 on DVD - get SD

Pay $2 on bluray - get HD

$5 only for DVD to HD

"An equal conversion for standard DVDs and Blu-ray discs will be $2. Standard DVDs can be upgraded to High-Def (HD) for $5."

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:10 PM
"Walmart to Unlock America's Favorite Movies with Exclusive Disc-to-Digital Service

Retailer Partners with Hollywood to Increase Value of Movie Ownership with Any Time Access to DVDs

Attention Journalists - Broadcast quality b-roll available for download

BENTONVILLE, Ark., March 13, 2012 – It’s time to unlock your DVDs America! The freedom to watch your movies any time, any place is here! Walmart is giving physical DVD/Blu-ray collections across the country a second life by turning them into digital movies. The nation’s largest home entertainment retailer is the first to announce an exclusive in-store disc-to-digital service which gives movie lovers the freedom to watch their DVD/Blu-ray collections from Internet-connected devices, including televisions, tablets, smartphones, gaming consoles and more. The service is powered by VUDU, the industry-leading video streaming service.

Walmart, in partnership with the major Hollywood studios: Paramount Home Media Distribution, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, Universal Studios Home Entertainment and Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, is increasing the value of movie ownership for its customers. Starting April 16th, 2012 in more than 3,500 stores, Walmart customers will be able to bring their DVD and Blu-ray collections to Walmart and receive digital access to their favorite titles from the partnering studios. An equal conversion for standard DVDs and Blu-ray discs will be $2. Standard DVDs can be upgraded to High-Def (HD) for $5.

The appetite for enjoying movies is strong and growing. Walmart wants to help movie lovers download or stream their movies when they want and where they want. Walmart asked thousands of customers their thoughts regarding movie ownership. Customers want to own physical Blu-rays and DVDs and customers also want to have digital access to those same movies for convenience. Customers also cited accessibility, security, affordability, and simplicity as key decision factors for wanting a digital solution. Walmart listened and is delivering America’s first disc-to-digital service.

“Walmart is helping America get access to their DVD library,” said John Aden, executive vice president for general merchandising, Walmart U.S. “Walmart Entertainment’s new disc-to-digital service will allow our customers to reconnect with the movies they already own on a variety of new devices, while preserving the investments they’ve made in disc purchases over the years. We believe this revolutionary in-store service will unlock new value for already-owned DVDs, and will encourage consumers to continue building physical and digital movie libraries in the future.”

Walmart Entertainment’s Disc-to-Digital Service Powered by VUDU: How it Works

The process to convert previously-purchased DVD/Blu-ray movies to digital copies is quick and simple:

Bring your movie collections from the participating studio partners – Paramount, Sony, Fox, Universal and Warner Bros. – to your local Walmart Photo Center.
A Walmart associate will help you create a free VUDU account.
Tell the associate how you’d like your movies converted:
Convert a standard DVD or Blu-ray movie for $2; or,
Upgrade a standard DVD to an HD digital copy for $5.
Walmart will authorize the digital copies and place them in your VUDU account. No upload is necessary, and you get to keep your physical discs.
Log onto VUDU.com from more than 300 Internet-connected devices to view movies any time, any place.
Walmart Entertainment supports UltraViolet, the movie industry's initiative currently in its beta phase that allows consumers to put their purchased movies into a cloud-based digital library and keep track of them safely and securely. Walmart is able to offer customers the ability to watch and purchase UltraViolet-enabled titles directly from VUDU. These enhancements to Walmart Entertainment’s services are the first of their kind from a major retailer and mark an important milestone in the expansion of digital home video ownership.

To learn more about Walmart Entertainment’s new services and to view an animated demonstration please visit: www.walmartstores.com/entertainment

Quotes from Walmart’s Studio Partners:

“Consumers today want new and flexible ways to enjoy movies and Walmart’s disc-to-digital program will be another important avenue to introduce Paramount movies on this new platform to a broader, more comprehensive audience,” said Dennis Maguire, president, Worldwide Home Media Distribution, Paramount Pictures. “The unmatched reach of Walmart – which serves over 140 million consumers every week – means we can quickly grow awareness for this unique technology throughout every region across the country.”

"Never before have consumers been able to add value to their existing collections so easily and economically as with Walmart’s disc-to-digital conversion service,” said David Bishop, president, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. “Disc-to-digital will be a milestone through which Hollywood and Walmart are finding ways to create even more value for consumers."

“With Walmart’s new disc-to-digital service, there has never been a better time to own movies,” said Simon Swart,
executive vice president and general manager, North America, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment. "There are more than 100 million households in the US that have an existing DVD or Blu-ray library. It is now possible to digitize those movies conveniently and enjoy the benefits that ownership gives at home or any place you go.”

“Walmart’s disc-to-digital service is a terrific consumer proposition, offering exceptional value, ease and convenience in preserving and enhancing consumers’ prized movie collections,” said Craig Kornblau, president, Universal Studios Home Entertainment. “Now, with the launch of this pioneering service, Blu-ray and DVD buyers are afforded both the opportunity and the affordability to future proof their movie collections and assemble their own digital libraries that can be easily stored and accessed through their own UltraViolet cloud for viewing anywhere, anytime.”

“Consumers want value and convenience and Walmart’s disc-to-digital service will deliver both while helping consumers realize the benefits of digital ownership,” Ron Sanders, president, Warner Home Video. “Between the heavy foot traffic in-store and the aggressive educational campaign Walmart is planning, this partnership is the perfect opportunity for us to reach a mainstream audience much sooner than by more traditional means, while making the process as quick and easy for consumers as possible.”"

It's funny how Walmart is emphasizing VUDU and not UV.

TowerGrove
03-13-2012, 12:14 PM
It's funny how Walmart is emphasizing VUDU and not UV.

What would you rather do, which is the clearer path?

See this:

http://blogs-images.forbes.com/dorothypomerantz/files/2012/03/Consumer-alternative.001-001.jpg

Kosty
03-13-2012, 12:17 PM
Some good news - the $2 fee is flat for DVD or bluray.

Pay $2 on DVD - get SD

Pay $2 on bluray - get HD

$5 only for DVD to HD

"An equal conversion for standard DVDs and Blu-ray discs will be $2. Standard DVDs can be upgraded to High-Def (HD) for $5."

That makes a tiny bit more sense.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:19 PM
$5 to upgrade to HD copy on Vudu for a DVD you own not available on Blu-ray could appeal to me for some titles.

It will only be for "approved" movies according to their little video - see ~:38 second mark.

Who knows how limited it will be. We do know there won't be any Disney movies, which might be a bummer for the kids in the back seat in the video.

Funny - in the friendly cartoon video they show the kids in the back of the car with a tablet. What they don't share is that to use Vudu on that tablet in the car you need the internet and to get the internet on tablets you need a 3G/4G data plan or tether it to your smartphone via Wifi hotpost, which also costs additional money.

You are looking at ~$30/month to use your tablet via cell phone data. Vudu is useless in the car without it.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:20 PM
What would you rather do, which is the clearer path?

See this:

http://blogs-images.forbes.com/dorothypomerantz/files/2012/03/Consumer-alternative.001-001.jpg

Funny.

Question - you have UV. I assume you have Vudu too.

Right now, can you view UV movies not purchased through Vudu via Vudu?

Kosty
03-13-2012, 12:22 PM
The idea of going first to the Vudu website to see it the movie qualifies makes sense.

It also looks like the Walmart procedure is just going to the photo counter , giving them your Vudu account information and then having the skus scanned for entry and marking the discs. That should not take much time, its basically a point of sale checkout transaction.

The biggest time issue will probably be walking in the store and getting past the greeter with the merchandise and getting it checked out like a store return.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:24 PM
Another question - what keeps the Walmart employees from using my Vudu account?

I have to give them my account info. Unless they let me type it in myself (unlikely), I basically have to give them my password.

Of course I could go home and change my password, but that isn't very convenient. I have to change my password every time I do disc-to-digital so that a Walmart employee doesn't have my Vudu password?

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:27 PM
The idea of going first to the Vudu website to see it the movie qualifies makes sense.

It also looks like the Walmart procedure is just going to the photo counter , giving them your Vudu account information and then having the skus scanned for entry and marking the discs. That should not take much time, its basically a point of sale checkout transaction.

The biggest time issue will probably be walking in the store and getting past the greeter with the merchandise and getting it checked out like a store return. Yes - the video says it will take mere "minutes".

Question - if they do stamp them, then they have to open every case and stamp the discs. That will take some time, in addition to entering each title into the Vudu account.

What if you turn in a bluray then go home to find out they gave you SD access instead of HD access? How foolproof is the system? Will they be scanning barcodes only? Do you need to have the case for the DVD/bluray?

Lots of questions...

mikemorel
03-13-2012, 12:30 PM
Funny - in the friendly cartoon video they show the kids in the back of the car with a tablet. What they don't share is that to use Vudu on that tablet in the car you need the internet and to get the internet on tablets you need a 3G/4G data plan or tether it to your smartphone via Wifi hotpost, which also costs additional money.

You are looking at ~$30/month to use your tablet via cell phone data. Vudu is useless in the car without it.Why wouldn't they simply download the CFF file and watch that, in HD, using their new iPad? Problem solved.

Another question - what keeps the Walmart employees from using my Vudu account?

I have to give them my account info. Unless they let me type it in myself (unlikely), I basically have to give them my password.

Of course I could go home and change my password, but that isn't very convenient. I have to change my password every time I do disc-to-digital so that a Walmart employee doesn't have my Vudu password?When you buy a blu-ray at Wal-Mart, do you give them your Debit Card password? No?

Then why would this be any different?

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:31 PM
And still, there is no single UV login.

You have Flixster, Sony, Vudu, etc.

Where is the synergy?

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:32 PM
Why wouldn't they simply download the CFF file and watch that, in HD, using their new iPad? Problem solved. Because as of today that is vaporware.

Will it be ready by April 16th????????

Will Apple allow playback of CFF on the iPad?

Or will it be another work-around, like launching the Flixster app to gain access to CFF files. There is no Vudu app.

When you buy a blu-ray at Wal-Mart, do you give them your Debit card password? No?

Then why would this be any different? They need to log in to your Vudu account to add the movies. Which means they need your password. Is there another way the lady at the Photo desk will be able to add your movies?

For debit cards they have pin terminals where I enter the code. For this I assume they will use the register BEHIND the counter - aka off access to me, so I need to give them my password.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:39 PM
For $5 do you get Vudu HD or VUdu HDX?

mikemorel
03-13-2012, 12:50 PM
Because as of today that is vaporware.

Will it be ready by April 16th????????

Will Apple allow playback of CFF on the iPad?

They need to log in to your Vudu account to add the movies. Which means they need your password.This is a fun spectator sport; watching bombsnizzle come up with 50 different reasons why this will fail, 20 minutes after the announcement.

"Bu-bu-but, if you show up with a bag of used DVDs they will throw you in jail for shoplifting". :lol:

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 12:54 PM
This is a fun spectator sport; watching bombsnizzle come up with 50 different reasons why this will fail, 20 minutes after the announcement.

"Bu-bu-but, if you show up with a bag of used DVDs they will throw you in jail for shoplifting". :lol:

I notice you chose to post this type of comment instead of actually answering the questions presented. Convenient.

If you can't or choose not to foresee the potential issues with this that isn't my problem.

Have you been to a Walmart? They aren't the smoothest running operations. Especially the ones in lower income neighborhoods.

Do they offer disc-to-digital for HD DVDs? I didn't seen that in the announcement. If so you can take all of yours to Walmart bright and early on April 16th.

TowerGrove
03-13-2012, 01:00 PM
Funny.

Question - you have UV. I assume you have Vudu too.

Right now, can you view UV movies not purchased through Vudu via Vudu?

I don't have VUDU access sorry bomb. I'm curious myself.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 01:03 PM
This is a fun spectator sport; watching bombsnizzle come up with 50 different reasons why this will fail, 20 minutes after the announcement.

"Bu-bu-but, if you show up with a bag of used DVDs they will throw you in jail for shoplifting". :lol:

I hope this works and gives momentum to UltraViolet as I want to see it succeed.

But you have to admit he's bringing up some interesting points and its not like a lot of other commentators pundits and posters here are also not showing a lot of skepticism on the concept or the price points.

A lot of people checking in the door with bags of DVDs that might have to be checked in like returns seems like a legitimate issue to wonder about. especially if they are recent titles. Any unopened ones obviously need to be checked in for instance and what's to stop consumers opening up DVDs and Blu-ray off the shelves and claiming that they were just walking out with Vudu enabled discs that they already had purchased. They probably have to do some sort of check in with the greeter to solve those issues.

Until it plays out and we see what happens in practice it would seem that a lot of potential issues are ripe for discussion here.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 01:17 PM
...and what's to stop consumers opening up DVDs and Blu-ray off the shelves and claiming that they were just walking out with Vudu enabled discs that they already had purchased. They probably have to do some sort of check in with the greeter to solve those issues.

Didn't think of this scenario.

Their video shows you just walking in the door straight to the Photo desk. No questions asked.

Walk in with 5 DVDs...leave with 15. :thumbsup:

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 01:22 PM
It's funny how Walmart is emphasizing VUDU and not UV.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2401511,00.asp

Walmart also said that the service will focus on Vudu, not the UltraViolet technology that the same studios endorsed at the CES show in January.

mikemorel
03-13-2012, 01:27 PM
Any unopened ones obviously need to be checked in for instance and what's to stop consumers opening up DVDs and Blu-ray off the shelves and claiming that they were just walking out with Vudu enabled discs that they already had purchased.The same thing that stops them from walking out the door with the same discs. FEAR OF ARREST!!!

Seriously?? If they openned the DVDs and BDs off the shelves, why wouldn't they simply take the UV code number and shove that in their pocket and walk out? Why would they pay $2 to $5 if they are already stealing the movie? Better yet, why don't they just rent and rip it from Redbox?

Is this is Theater of the Absurd?

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 01:27 PM
Hilarious:

Seong Ohm, SVP and GM for Walmart Entertainment, said “a lot” of research showed the price point was the “sweet spot” for consumers, adding some people were willing to pay more.
http://www.homemediamagazine.com/walmart/walmart-bows-vudu-based-disc-digital-program-26664

"Sweet spot" for the consumers. Right. You know what would have been even sweet? $1. I guess that is too sweet. Apparently no one wanted $1. Only $2 or more.:rolleyes:

mikemorel
03-13-2012, 01:31 PM
Didn't think of this scenario.

Their video shows you just walking in the door straight to the Photo desk. No questions asked.

Walk in with 5 DVDs...leave with 15. :thumbsup:Blu-ray copy protection is hopelessly and completely broken. There are easier ways to steal them that don't involve Walmart.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 01:32 PM
The same thing that stops them from walking out the door with the same discs. FEAR OF ARREST!!! Some people don;t care about getting arrested.

Seriously?? If they openned the DVDs and BDs off the shelves, why wouldn't they simply take the UV code number and shove that in their pocket and walk out? Why would they pay $2 to $5 if they are already stealing the movie? Better yet, why don't they just rent and rip it from Redbox? This is cute. You are thinking of it from a viewpoint of the consumer wanting the digital version.

The viewpoint is they come in with DVDs and leave with more (stolen) DVDs that they would say were used as part of the Vudu conversion. Duh. They are seeking to steal DVDs - not digital versions.

Is this is Theater of the Absurd?You are looking at things from a biased perspective and can't see the issues. Like above. You really think people would crack open the DVD to get the UV code? NO. They want the physical product. I walk in with 2 DVDs in a bag, leave with 6 DVDs. The only way they will know is if they compare what is in my bag when I leave to the receipt I got from the photo desk that shows the movies I transferred, assuming the receipt does show such a thing. This opens a window for easy theft if not done properly.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 01:35 PM
Blu-ray copy protection is hopelessly and completely broken. There are easier ways to steal them that don't involve Walmart.

You don't get it do you?

PEOPLE STEAL DVDS TO SELL THEM!!

Unless certain safeguards are in place, the bringing in of DVDs in a bag opens the possibility for increased DVD/bluray theft.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 01:37 PM
Chris Nagelson, VP of entertainment merchandising for Walmart, said discs that undergo the digital conversion will be stamped in the middle of the disc to prevent copies from being converted twice. Employees will verify the disc with a barcode, and if the film is available via UltraViolet, will make a version available on the consumers’ UltraViolet account. If the disc in question is not available for UltraViolet, consumers can have an email sent to them, notifying them when it is.
http://www.homemediamagazine.com/walmart/walmart-bows-vudu-based-disc-digital-program-26664

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 01:42 PM
WalMart has the exclusive right to convert discs to digital in stores. (Samsung has announced a Blu-ray player that will transfer discs to digital for UltraViolet.) The company also plans a “multimonth educational campaign” both in and out of its stores to help people figure out what to do with their discs and how to access movies on mobile and other digital devices.
http://www.deadline.com/2012/03/walmart-supports-ultraviolet-and-launches-exclusive-disc-to-digital-service/

So no disc-to-digital at Best Buy? That is dumb. Why cut out a major player?

Silly me - I know why - because Walmart wants to push Vudu (not UV). The studios caved to Walmart, sacrificing Best Buy as a partner so that Walmart gets to promote the hell out of Vudu,

Again the fragmentation in the digital sector rears it's ugly head.

The studios sold out additional support via Best Buy to appease Walmart's push of Vudu, which likely means less overall potential conversions since a lot of people use Best Buy for movie purchases.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 01:43 PM
The same thing that stops them from walking out the door with the same discs. FEAR OF ARREST!!!

Seriously?? If they openned the DVDs and BDs off the shelves, why wouldn't they simply take the UV code number and shove that in their pocket and walk out? Why would they pay $2 to $5 if they are already stealing the movie? Better yet, why don't they just rent and rip it from Redbox?

Is this is Theater of the Absurd?

The point was that the discs coming into the store have to be checked in some way to preclude that possibility and that will add hassle to the process to normal consumers.

Also shrinkage is a real issue at Walmart stores and adding a process that has lots of consumers bringing recent discs into the store that they already own and may not have receipts for to co mingle in the store with unpaid merchandise creates advantages for shop lifters to push if steps are not taken to account for those angles.

I'm glad that you do not think like a thief or store security guy though. But its a real issue that undoubtedly has already been thought of and planned for in the process of launching this strategy.

bombsnizzle
03-13-2012, 01:47 PM
For $5 do you get Vudu HD or VUdu HDX?

Ruh Roh.

Here's how it works:
1. Bring in any physical Blu-rays or DVD (from the above studios) into your local Walmart.
2. Choose HD (720p) or SD quality. Blu-ray to HD or DVD to SD "conversion" will cost $2 per title, and DVD to HD "conversion" will cost $5. But the important thing to know is that this isn't really a conversion or a traditional movie 'rip'; Walmart employees will simply verify your movie and authorize that title for your VUDU. Oh, and you get to keep your disc!
3. Log into any Vudu-enabled media player to stream your movies anytime, anywhere (well, as long has you have an Internet connection). There are currently over 300 devices, including Phones, PCs, TVs, Blu-ray players, PlayStation 3s, or XBox 360s.
Also, for anyone who has UltraViolet Digital Copies, which are often included in multi-disc Blu-ray releases, you'll be able to watch, and purchase, UltraViolet titles directly from your VUDU account as well.
However, for your average HDD reader, there may be a few hiccups. First and formost, while I'm a huge fan of VUDU's HDX 1080p (as well as Dolby Digital Plus in 5.1 or 7.1) format, I confirmed that this disc-to-digital service is only for VUDU "HD", which is 720p. Second, what about all the earlier versions of Digital Copy (the pre-UltraViolet movies), which often cost more than the Blu-ray only copy of the film; will these be ignored? And, as movie collectors, do you really want to haul boxes of movies into a store to have them load your films into your VUDU account?
http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/High-Def_Retailing/Industry_Trends/Michael_S_Palmer/Walmart/Walmart_Launches_Exclusive_In-Store_Disc-to-Digital_VUDU_Service/9002

So I pay $2 to convert my 1080p bluray to 720p? Hmm.....

Kosty
03-13-2012, 01:50 PM
Some people don;t care about getting arrested.

This is cute. You are thinking of it from a viewpoint of the consumer wanting the digital version.

The viewpoint is they come in with DVDs and leave with more (stolen) DVDs that they would say were used as part of the Vudu conversion. Duh. They are seeking to steal DVDs - not digital versions.

You are looking at things from a biased perspective and can't see the issues. Like above. You really think people would crack open the DVD to get the UV code? NO. They want the physical product. I walk in with 2 DVDs in a bag, leave with 6 DVDs. The only way they will know is if they compare what is in my bag when I leave to the receipt I got from the photo desk that shows the movies I transferred, assuming the receipt does show such a thing. This opens a window for easy theft if not done properly.

Exactly right. Unless there is a procedure to account for the discs coming in without a receipt, which means some check in process, it might be easy to claim that some discs a person grabbed in the store were already owned.

What's to stop someone adding some discs from the isle displays into your bag of discs from home to be added to your UltraViolet account?

A consumer can go into the bathroom with his brown bag from home and open the stolen discs and add them to their disc collection unless they were checked in at the store entrance.

$2 for a new DVD converted to Vudu access that you did not own and you still can walk out of the store with the stolen DVD you can sell anyway. So there has to be a store check in at entry which will just add to the hassle factor of the whole process.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 01:53 PM
Blu-ray copy protection is hopelessly and completely broken. There are easier ways to steal them that don't involve Walmart.

Shrinkage aka shoplifting of packaged media movies and games is a large problem at any retailer including Walmart.

They obviously have to take steps to make sure this initiative does not add to the problem and that will mean some additional hassle to consumers trying to do this conversion.

jkkyler
03-13-2012, 02:24 PM
What about us losers who use Roku instead of vudu? Will there be a UV channel to us and also do you have to go to wal-mart to register discs or can you do it at home somehow and if so is the cost the same/less/more?

JerryDandridge
03-13-2012, 02:28 PM
http://www.homemediamagazine.com/walmart/walmart-bows-vudu-based-disc-digital-program-26664

From the article:

Employees will verify the disc with a barcode, and if the film is available via UltraViolet, will make a version available on the consumers’ UltraViolet account. If the disc in question is not available for UltraViolet, consumers can have an email sent to them, notifying them when it is.

Guess this means you better check to make sure the disc titles you have are part of the VUDU library (about 13,300 titles) before lugging them down to Wallyworld.

sbuberl
03-13-2012, 02:30 PM
What about us losers who use Roku instead of vudu? Will there be a UV channel to us and also do you have to go to wal-mart to register discs or can you do it at home somehow and if so is the cost the same/less/more?

I have a Roku (and a PS3 with Vudu). I believe Flixster plans on adding UV to their existent Roku app (when? don't know). Also, Amazon will be doing trial support of UV for one studio, so hopefully, they'll join fully and UV moves will be available through them too. We'll see.

chipvideo
03-13-2012, 02:39 PM
For $5 do you get Vudu HD or VUdu HDX?

What difference does it make. The average person couldn't tell or ever care for that matter.

mikemorel
03-13-2012, 02:39 PM
TK's Take:

Walmart-UltraViolet Deal: A Bold, Innovative Way to Launch an Entertainment Product (http://www.homemediamagazine.com/tks-take/walmart-ultraviolet-deal-bold-innovative-way-launch-entertainment-product)

Today’s announcement by Walmart that it will participate in the UltraViolet project marks a turning point in the way a new entertainment product or technology is traditionally launched.

Generally the Hollywood-CE partnership takes aim at the early adopters, hoping to wow the tech heads and then ride their wave of enthusiasm into the mainstream where it either catches on like wildfire (DVD) or slowly builds over a period of years until it becomes the new standard (Blu-ray Disc).

With UltraViolet, the studios and their partners are taking an unprecedented approach: They are going directly to the masses, hoping to win over middle America right away. And they couldn’t have picked a better partner than Walmart, the country’s top DVD and Blu-ray Disc seller (40% market share) and biggest retailer, period, with more than 3,800 U.S. stores that each week are visited by about 100 million customers, representing nearly one-third of the country’s total population.

But having Walmart on board so early in the game isn’t just a marketing win. It’s a strategic win, a tremendous vote of confidence that underscores my belief that with UltraViolet, Hollywood truly has built a better mousetrap in which the big winner is the consumer.

Too often, I think, we lose sight of consumers, who want to pay as little as possible for as much as possible and, at the same time, are looking for the easiest, simplest way to get what they want. Walmart has always put the consumer first, studying consumer trends and habits and then reacting, as it did with $4 prescriptions. We all know how big a success that was, and with UltraViolet Walmart is gearing up for an encore. Forget all the naysayers who keep harping on home entertainment as being a business in decline. Walmart obviously sees bringing digital functionality to physical discs as a winning combination, both for our business and, more importantly, for the consumer.

I have to agree. UltraViolet began as a way to turn a Blu-ray Disc into the be-all and end-all of home entertainment. Consumers buy a movie once and then send a copy into their very own digital locker up in the cloud, where they can access it anytime they want, on any device they want, in perpetuity.

A brilliant concept — in my book it’s one of the smartest things our industry has ever done.

The only thing better — I remember thinking back when UltraViolet was launched — would be to provide consumers with a way to do the same thing with their existing disc collections. And that’s precisely what Walmart is bringing into the game.

The first phase of the transfer process will be limited to retail, but that makes sense. This is a revolutionary concept, and consumers will need a little hand-holding. Phase two will involve online transfers, something that’s already on the way courtesy of specially equipped Blu-ray Disc players from Samsung.

The transfer fees for disc-to-digital conversion are reasonable, and I think both segments of the UltraViolet business model — buying Blu-ray Discs with cloud storage included in the purchase price, and sending discs you already own into the cloud — will feed off each other.

Wearing my consumer hat, I’m thrilled. And once I explain the concept to my friends, most of them are equally enthusiastic, especially the ones who have accidentally mailed a Redbox disc to Netflix or downloaded a movie from iTunes only to lose it when their computer crashed.

UltraViolet promises to be one of our industry’s true transformational moments. And with Walmart onboard, the potential impact is huge. It’s all about keeping the customer satisfied. :banana: :lol:

chipvideo
03-13-2012, 02:44 PM
This is nothing but a fart in the wind IMO. All hype and no show.

bruceames
03-13-2012, 04:03 PM
So according to TK, this is a "brilliant" idea? We'll see about that, but from where I sit, doing this is a double-edged sword because it smacks of a "red-to-blu" or "dvd-to-blu" program, giving the impression that OD will soon become obsolete and make way for digital. It's sends the wrong message to consumers. It is worth a couple of bucks from each of maybe 5-10% of DVD owners that would consider it? I don't think so, but we'll see what happens.

DonnyDC
03-13-2012, 04:44 PM
Is the ipad still restricted to SD Vudu movies?
Due to restrictions by content providers, playback is limited to SD quality. However, you can purchase a movie on your iPad for viewing in HD or HDX resolution on your TV.
http://blog.vudu.com/2011/08/now-playing-vudu-on-ipad/

What difference does it make. The average person couldn't tell or ever care for that matter.I guess you can logically assume that walmart doesnt just wanna focus on the average person.

mikemorel
03-13-2012, 05:23 PM
So according to TK, this is a "brilliant" idea?I was thinking the same thing when I read this article. But then I thought, makes perfect sense...For TK, being a Studio Schill trumps being a Disc Schill. He knows where his allegiance lies.

We'll see about that, but from where I sit, doing this is a double-edged sword because it smacks of a "red-to-blu" or "dvd-to-blu" program, giving the impression that OD will soon become obsolete and make way for digital.Announcements like this are a subtle reminder to US consumers that digital distribution is the future and that future is arriving.

It's sends the wrong message to consumers.Apparently it is the message at least some studios don't mind sending. Surely they must know how this affects consumer perception.

It is worth a couple of bucks from each of maybe 5-10% of DVD owners that would consider it? I don't think so, but we'll see what happens.I don't think this is about the money; it's more about the studios making a statement of "Digital DVD" (UV) support by Walmart. Studios are finally beginning to embrace digital delivery, instead of protecting OD.

DonnyDC
03-13-2012, 05:44 PM
You guys are over thinking this. New DVDs have UV support, this is giving old dvds retroactive UV support.
The alternative is people illegally ripping them and other piracy.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 06:20 PM
So according to TK, this is a "brilliant" idea? We'll see about that, but from where I sit, doing this is a double-edged sword because it smacks of a "red-to-blu" or "dvd-to-blu" program, giving the impression that OD will soon become obsolete and make way for digital. It's sends the wrong message to consumers. It is worth a couple of bucks from each of maybe 5-10% of DVD owners that would consider it? I don't think so, but we'll see what happens.

Well if you are inclined to do it then you are interested in it and will pay attention to it. If you are thinking that movie watching on portable devices is silly and you rather collect Blu-ray or DVDs then it won't matter much to you.

For the price points being high for now they can always come down or be discounted or promoted in the future.

But I think the point Tom K. Arnold is making is that jump starting consumer's UltraViolet collections with a conversion of Disc to Digital only enhances the value of adding to the collections in the future with future BD+DVD+UV or DVD+UV or UltraViolet or Vudu digital only sell through purchases in the future.

But you raise some good points as well.

Most consumer with DVD around have about 100 discs on average in their home IIRC. If this gets some consumers in the habit more of continuing to value buying instead of renting or streaming then its a nice jumpstart to UltraViolet and make make ownership more appealing again than just streaming or rental. That's the hope for UltraViolet in any case.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 06:26 PM
I was thinking the same thing when I read this article. But then I thought, makes perfect sense...For TK, being a Studio Schill trumps being a Disc Schill. He knows where his allegiance lies.

Announcements like this are a subtle reminder to US consumers that digital distribution is the future and that future is arriving.

Apparently it is the message at least some studios don't mind sending. Surely they must know how this affects consumer perception.

I don't think this is about the money; it's more about the studios making a statement of "Digital DVD" (UV) support by Walmart. Studios are finally beginning to embrace digital delivery, instead of protecting OD.

Studios and retailers want to promote and sustain the physical sell through channel as well as developing the digital sell through channel.

Having consumers jump start their libraries in the cloud also helps increase the value of ownership of future physical media sets with Vudu or UV copies in the set when you buy a physical disc. It also encourages consumers to add to their digital collections by buying digital copies at high margin as well as physical copies with digital Vudu or UV digital copies as well.

Consumers that are still buying DVD and Blu-ray are not likely to stop and rush out and go all Vudu or UV. This adds value to those physical purchases as well. What this may do it help increase anemic EST Vudu and UV sales as well.

TowerGrove
03-13-2012, 07:23 PM
http://www.deadline.com/2012/03/walmart-supports-ultraviolet-and-launches-exclusive-disc-to-digital-service/

So no disc-to-digital at Best Buy? That is dumb. Why cut out a major player?

Silly me - I know why - because Walmart wants to push Vudu (not UV). The studios caved to Walmart, sacrificing Best Buy as a partner so that Walmart gets to promote the hell out of Vudu,

Again the fragmentation in the digital sector rears it's ugly head.

The studios sold out additional support via Best Buy to appease Walmart's push of Vudu, which likely means less overall potential conversions since a lot of people use Best Buy for movie purchases.


Interesting tidbit:
According to Edward Lichty, Vudu's general manager, uploading the movie to a digital format will put it into the UltraViolet cloud; users will be able to watch that movie with another UltraViolet-compatible client, such as Flixster, or take a previously purchased UV movie and view it using Vudu.

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2401511,00.asp

TowerGrove
03-13-2012, 07:26 PM
This is nothing but a fart in the wind IMO. All hype and no show.

Looks like Walmart will be marketing the heck out of this service in the next several months.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 07:31 PM
So no disc-to-digital at Best Buy? That is dumb. Why cut out a major player?

Silly me - I know why - because Walmart wants to push Vudu (not UV). The studios caved to Walmart, sacrificing Best Buy as a partner so that Walmart gets to promote the hell out of Vudu,

Walmart is providing the infrastructure to do this disc to digital conversion with Vudu.

They want some head start in any case for their promotional efforts as they are committing to a multi month promotional effort in store at least.

Best Buy has a competitive digital cloud service in Cinemanow. Best Buy could do something similar in the future as well or just support UltraViolet in some other way.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 09:07 PM
It seems that Walmart at least thinks it helps with physical as well.

“It will encourage customers to continue buying physical DVDs,” says John Aden, WalMart’s EVP General Merchandise.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/03/walmart-supports-ultraviolet-and-launches-exclusive-disc-to-digital-service/

sbuberl
03-13-2012, 09:36 PM
To the article that said HD Vudu UV copies would be normal HD (720p), Vudu's own message forums says differently:

http://forum.vudu.com/showthread.php?t=82421

I'm hoping this source is correct but we'll have to wait and see.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 09:49 PM
To the article that said HD Vudu UV copies would be normal HD (720p), Vudu's own message forums says differently:

http://forum.vudu.com/showthread.php?t=82421

I'm hoping this source is correct but we'll have to wait and see.

HDX ain't quite Blu-ray but its getting there and would be the best quality available if a Blu-ray version was not available if the title was not out on Blu-ray yet. Plus that's pretty good quality for a portable device.

Kosty
03-13-2012, 09:53 PM
The vudu.com site mentions HD/HDX digital video. I guess it depends on what is the speed of your connection and what is available on the site already.

http://www.vudu.com/images/disctodigital/Disc-to-Digital-Text.png

http://www.vudu.com/images/disctodigital/Bullet_Box.png

http://www.vudu.com/disc_to_digital.html

TowerGrove
03-14-2012, 05:24 AM
The vudu.com site mentions HD/HDX digital video. I guess it depends on what is the speed of your connection and what is available on the site already.

http://www.vudu.com/images/disctodigital/Disc-to-Digital-Text.png

http://www.vudu.com/images/disctodigital/Bullet_Box.png

http://www.vudu.com/disc_to_digital.html

Can you download the movies you own from VUDU. Ultraviolet provides that service?

Kosty
03-14-2012, 06:21 AM
Can you download the movies you own from VUDU. Ultraviolet provides that service?

I have never tried. Vudu download to go is available now.

The Vudu website says it can be done to certain devices, here is the pdf on it.

http://www.vudu.com/docs/Download-and-Store-Feature-2010210.pdf

HDD had a story on Vudu download to go which debuted last year. I have never tried it.

At the time it seems it was a standard definition copy.


Vudu-To-Go Lets You Download Movies to Watch Later


Mon Nov 21, 2011 at 12:00 PM ET
Tags: VUDU, Digital Distribution (all tags)

The company has announced a few deals as well, like $5 credit when you buy a DVD or Blu-ray at Walmart.

The folks at Vudu tend to be held up as the one group that's doing digital distribution right - at least when it comes to video and audio quality. Today they've stepped over another significant hurdle in the online video world.

If you bought a movie from Vudu, you can now download that movie to your computer for future watching. That means you don't have to be online to watch the movie you bought online - a really nice step forward.

The downside of course, is that since it's a PC version you'll be stuck with standard definition. On the plus side, if the format is right this could be transferrable to smartphones, game systems and tablets.
The company announced a few cool deals too. If you buy select films from Walmart you'll be getting a $5 Vudu credit or a free Vudu rental from a list of selected titles.

To download, simply go to VUDU, head over to your purchased movies and hit "Download"

Today VUDU launched VUDU-To-Go, a new feature that allows customers to download purchased movies and television shows to their computers and watch them later. Any purchased title within VUDU’s catalog of 40,000 blockbusters, Hollywood classics, independent films, and TV shows can now be downloaded to your PC or Mac to watch at a later time.

In addition to VUDU streaming, now customers can also enjoy their VUDU movie libraries on their computer whenever they want – and without an Internet connection. Perfect for plane trips, car rides and more, the new feature allows you to take your VUDU entertainment with you.

To download your purchased VUDU content, simply visit www.vudu.com/movies, navigate to purchased movies and television shows and click the “Download” button. VUDU movie purchases start at $4.99 and TV show purchases start at $1.99 per episode and start at $7.99 –for a complete season.

There is no additional download fee.


http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/show/VUDU/Vudu-To-Go/Digital_Distribution/Vudu-To-Go_Lets_You_Download_Movies_to_Watch_Later/8133

bombsnizzle
03-14-2012, 07:28 AM
The vudu.com site mentions HD/HDX digital video. I guess it depends on what is the speed of your connection and what is available on the site already.

http://www.vudu.com/disc_to_digital.html

Note the asterisk:
"HD/HDX is not available on all devices or films"

So...

Step 1) see if the movie you want to convert is available from Vudu
Step 2) see if the movie you want is available in HD/HDX, or only in SD.

I can see certain studios not putting their titles up in HD/HDX. So if you only have the bluray of a movie, you are getting ripped off, since you might only be able to get an SD version, but it will still cost the full $2. In that case you are paying $2 to go from 1080 to 480.

Kosty
03-14-2012, 07:47 AM
If you have the Blu-ray version of the movie then the advantage is to play the Vudu copy on portable devices or smaller screens around the home as a portable digital copy as you already have the best quality available for your larger display in the house as a Blu-ray Disc version.

But I agree the HD/HDX quality issue is a bit up in the air for what you get. Its also dependent not only what they have but the speed of your connection as well as HDX needs more bandwidth speed than HD or SD.

bombsnizzle
03-14-2012, 08:29 AM
If you have the Blu-ray version of the movie then the advantage is to play the Vudu copy on portable devices or smaller screens around the home as a portable digital copy as you already have the best quality available for your larger display in the house as a Blu-ray Disc version. The newer tablets will all have displays with resolution of 1080p or better. The new iPad for instance. Asus Transformer Pad Infinity too.

bombsnizzle
03-14-2012, 08:59 AM
Valid Point:

BTIG Research analyst Richard Greenfield said the high-definition transfer fee is half what he was expecting. He reiterated previous sentiments that the upload fee should be free to consumers as an incentive to join...Given that consumers do not know which studio makes their movies and [in-store signage does] not say don’t bring your Disney movies in, we are curious if consumers will be frustrated by the inability to convert Disney content (and how the marketing campaign will address this it)," Greenfield wrote.
http://www.homemediamagazine.com/walmart/walmart-bows-vudu-based-disc-digital-program-26664

People that bring in Disney DVDs are going to disappointed.

bombsnizzle
03-14-2012, 09:07 AM
"Walmart employees will begin training on the new service in a couple of weeks, with both photo service employees and employees behind the Connections Center able to help consumers. Trained employees will be armed with a standards and procedures manual, Walmart representatives said.

“Those associates are really used to those type of transactions,” Nagelson said, adding that those employees are used to handling phone and photo services."

Well I feel better. They will start training in a few weeks, even though April 16 is 1 month away.:confused:

I'm sure photo service employees and employees behind the Connections Center will be at the top of their game.

bruceames
03-14-2012, 09:49 AM
Valid Point:


http://www.homemediamagazine.com/walmart/walmart-bows-vudu-based-disc-digital-program-26664

People that bring in Disney DVDs are going to disappointed.

It's going to be crazy. Disney movies are going to be the first choice for consumers to convert because it'll make it easier for them to load them up for their kids.

As long as Disney is not on board then UV will be a total failure. Launching this exclusive Walmart service without Disney is a mistake.

mikemorel
03-14-2012, 10:43 AM
It's going to be crazy. Disney movies are going to be the first choice for consumers to convert because it'll make it easier for them to load them up for their kids.

As long as Disney is not on board then UV will be a total failure. Launching this exclusive Walmart service without Disney is a mistake.Total Failure? People won't be lined up to take advantage of this on day one, and you said yourself that only 5%-10% max would take advantage at all. Most who know the service even exists will know that Disney is not participating. So a meager few early adopters get some titles registered and not others. Not the end of the world. Hell, most thirtysomethings with small children probably already "converted" Disney titles themselves.

But it just underscores the urgency the studios must be feeling to launch this initiative before it is fully online.

Anyway, what choice does Disney have, other than joining UV? Launching Keychest would guarantee that both Keychest AND Ultraviolet fail. There is more than enough confusion now with Apple's cloud service up and running.

Walmart should instruct consumers who complain about the lack of Disney titles to take the matter up with Disney. That might get them to play ball.

bruceames
03-14-2012, 11:07 AM
Total Failure? People won't be lined up to take advantage of this on day one, and you said yourself that only 5%-10% max would take advantage at all. Most who know the service even exists will know that Disney is not participating. So a meager few early adopters get some titles registered and not others. Not the end of the world. Hell, most thirtysomethings with small children probably already "converted" Disney titles themselves.

But it just underscores the urgency the studios must be feeling to launch this initiative before it is fully online.

Anyway, what choice does Disney have, other than joining UV? Launching Keychest would guarantee that both Keychest AND Ultraviolet fail. There is more than enough confusion now with Apple's cloud service up and running.

Walmart should instruct consumers who complain about the lack of Disney titles to take the matter up with Disney. That might get them to play ball.

Just think it's a mistake to launch a service mainstream like this while it's still a work in process. First impressions are important when taking the masses into account, they'll see that UV is incomplete and not give it a second look. The early adopters know better of course.

Sure, sales will occur and register on the EST ticker. But what about lost sales from consumers who see UV as the replacement to OD and stop buying discs for that reason? Double-edged sword, not much different than introducing the HD formats at DVD's peak, expect this time the physical form is gone, so the change is more dramatic.

TowerGrove
03-14-2012, 11:53 AM
Valid Point:


http://www.homemediamagazine.com/walmart/walmart-bows-vudu-based-disc-digital-program-26664

People that bring in Disney DVDs are going to disappointed.

People who bring in their porn collections will be disappointed as well. I would love to see the look on the Walmart associates face when someone brings in a big box of titles of the "Adult" variety for their $2 UV upgrade. :D :D

TowerGrove
03-14-2012, 11:58 AM
It's going to be crazy. Disney movies are going to be the first choice for consumers to convert because it'll make it easier for them to load them up for their kids.

As long as Disney is not on board then UV will be a total failure. Launching this exclusive Walmart service without Disney is a mistake.

Bruce I don't see UV being a failure. It will be only a matter of time now that two of the worlds largest retailers are on board, Amazon and Walmart. Disney will be coming up to the table in no time at all.

BTW.. Where is the Disney version of UV? Why are we hearing nothing about that?

TowerGrove
03-14-2012, 12:02 PM
Total Failure? People won't be lined up to take advantage of this on day one, and you said yourself that only 5%-10% max would take advantage at all. Most who know the service even exists will know that Disney is not participating. So a meager few early adopters get some titles registered and not others. Not the end of the world. Hell, most thirtysomethings with small children probably already "converted" Disney titles themselves.

But it just underscores the urgency the studios must be feeling to launch this initiative before it is fully online.

Anyway, what choice does Disney have, other than joining UV? Launching Keychest would guarantee that both Keychest AND Ultraviolet fail. There is more than enough confusion now with Apple's cloud service up and running.

Walmart should instruct consumers who complain about the lack of Disney titles to take the matter up with Disney. That might get them to play ball.


I expect to see this thing marketed as the best thing since sliced bread. It will be marketed to the Jayne and Joe six packs the "People of Walmart" crowd and not the enthusiast and collector like us.

I expect this to become a big success with the proper marketing to the right crowd.

ack_bak
03-14-2012, 12:29 PM
I expect to see this thing marketed as the best thing since sliced bread. It will be marketed to the Jayne and Joe six packs the "People of Walmart" crowd and not the enthusiast and collector like us.

I expect this to become a big success with the proper marketing to the right crowd.

I was skeptical before about this whole deal and I am just as skeptical now. You are asking people to rebuy movies digitally that they already own on a disc. And in order to do that, they have to haul their movies to Walmart of all places and work with a photolab technician who may or may not know what they are doing and who may already be dealing with a big line of customers waiting for pictures. :helpme

Throw in the Disney factor and it just seems like a cluster you know what...

Time will tell, but I just don't see this doing much to the bottomline for the studios. There has to be better ideas than this...

bombsnizzle
03-14-2012, 01:36 PM
Total Failure? People won't be lined up to take advantage of this on day one, and you said yourself that only 5%-10% max would take advantage at all. Most who know the service even exists will know that Disney is not participating. So a meager few early adopters get some titles registered and not others. Not the end of the world. Hell, most thirtysomethings with small children probably already "converted" Disney titles themselves.

Wait...I thought the studios said there is HUGE demand from the masses that want to liberate their collection and watch their DVD-shelf movies on the go on their mobile devices???? As if people are saying to themselves "man - I would re-watch "The Big Lebowski" for the 7th time if only I had it on my phone instead of on my DVD shelf".:rolleyes:

Reality - I don't re-watch the movies on my shelf because I don't feel like it or have the time to watch them again (obviously I've already seen them). That's why I stopped buying movies. That's why I use Redbox to rent new movies I haven't seen for $1 and change. I don't think I am alone. My issue isn't I would watch them more if they were portable.

I simply am not going to pay Walmart $2 to get a digital portable version that won't be watched just like the physical copy sitting on my shelf isn't watched. It isn't the portability that is making me not re-watch my collection. A digital version would collect digital dust just like my physical copies collect real dust.

The problem isn't DVDs on the shelf not being watched because they aren't portable - the problem is people have lots of other things to do besides watching movies now.

Hollywood is over-estimating this supposed pent-up demand for portability of movie collections. It is already easy to order a movie rental on phones and tablets.

I simply do not see the public clamor for having portable movie collections. It works for certain things. Kids in a car backseat. Or plane rides. Or hotel stays where the hotel offers free wifi. Other than that, what are you going to get in 15 minute portions on your bus ride everyday? Lunch break? Full length movies don't work in the segmented consumption way that music or TV shows do. Without an extended period of viewing time portable movie collections are pointless IMO.

I would get more use of UV merely being able to stream movies on in home devices than viewing movies on the go. But like I said, if I don't watch the movies I own now, why would I watch a digital version? Merely because it is digital? No. I won't watch it just like I don't watch what I have now.

Kosty
03-14-2012, 02:16 PM
It's going to be crazy. Disney movies are going to be the first choice for consumers to convert because it'll make it easier for them to load them up for their kids.

As long as Disney is not on board then UV will be a total failure. Launching this exclusive Walmart service without Disney is a mistake.

Lots of moving parts here that have potential to irritate consumers.

Hope it works well though but I think skepticism of how well it will go off and how much consumers react to it is really warranted here.

Kosty
03-14-2012, 02:18 PM
Just think it's a mistake to launch a service mainstream like this while it's still a work in process. First impressions are important when taking the masses into account, they'll see that UV is incomplete and not give it a second look. The early adopters know better of course.

Sure, sales will occur and register on the EST ticker. But what about lost sales from consumers who see UV as the replacement to OD and stop buying discs for that reason? Double-edged sword, not much different than introducing the HD formats at DVD's peak, expect this time the physical form is gone, so the change is more dramatic.

The entire UltraViolet launch has been a work in progress.

The studios want to move it along for the future but they also do not want to screw up the still huge packaged media sell through revenue stream so they have this two step dance going on.

TowerGrove
03-14-2012, 05:29 PM
Lots of moving parts here that have potential to irritate consumers.

Hope it works well though but I think skepticism of how well it will go off and how much consumers react to it is really warranted here.

Doesn't it also irritate consumers who buy digital copies on iTunes only to realize that when they switch to android or decide to watch their videos on something other than Apple branded product that they can't? How is this (UV) worse or less worse than the options provided by Apple Inc yet Apple seems to be doing just fine in their media Dept?

TowerGrove
03-14-2012, 05:34 PM
I was skeptical before about this whole deal and I am just as skeptical now. You are asking people to rebuy movies digitally that they already own on a disc. And in order to do that, they have to haul their movies to Walmart of all places and work with a photolab technician who may or may not know what they are doing and who may already be dealing with a big line of customers waiting for pictures. :helpme

Throw in the Disney factor and it just seems like a cluster you know what...

Time will tell, but I just don't see this doing much to the bottomline for the studios. There has to be better ideas than this...

Curious Ack are you also skeptical of the iTunes movie walled garden standard? Doesn't apple want you to rebuy your movies to store in their iCloud. With music didn't they try to resell you a copy in the cloud that you may or may not have purchased for an upload fee? Thought I saw that being advertised sometime last year? Again how is UV and the Walmart move any better or worse than the iTunes movie store? Or do you dislike both services?

TowerGrove
03-14-2012, 05:44 PM
Wait...I thought the studios said there is HUGE demand from the masses that want to liberate their collection and watch their DVD-shelf movies on the go on their mobile devices???? As if people are saying to themselves "man - I would re-watch "The Big Lebowski" for the 7th time if only I had it on my phone instead of on my DVD shelf".:rolleyes:

Reality - I don't re-watch the movies on my shelf because I don't feel like it or have the time to watch them again (obviously I've already seen them). That's why I stopped buying movies. That's why I use Redbox to rent new movies I haven't seen for $1 and change. I don't think I am alone. My issue isn't I would watch them more if they were portable.

I simply am not going to pay Walmart $2 to get a digital portable version that won't be watched just like the physical copy sitting on my shelf isn't watched. It isn't the portability that is making me not re-watch my collection. A digital version would collect digital dust just like my physical copies collect real dust.

The problem isn't DVDs on the shelf not being watched because they aren't portable - the problem is people have lots of other things to do besides watching movies now.

Hollywood is over-estimating this supposed pent-up demand for portability of movie collections. It is already easy to order a movie rental on phones and tablets.

I simply do not see the public clamor for having portable movie collections. It works for certain things. Kids in a car backseat. Or plane rides. Or hotel stays where the hotel offers free wifi. Other than that, what are you going to get in 15 minute portions on your bus ride everyday? Lunch break? Full length movies don't work in the segmented consumption way that music or TV shows do. Without an extended period of viewing time portable movie collections are pointless IMO.

I would get more use of UV merely being able to stream movies on in home devices than viewing movies on the go. But like I said, if I don't watch the movies I own now, why would I watch a digital version? Merely because it is digital? No. I won't watch it just like I don't watch what I have now.

People bought around $10 billion dollars in disc and EST last year that shows that many people still want to purchase their movies instead of renting.

You many not watch movies you own now but many people do. I agree who are these people watching full length movies on the go. On the tube and NY subway look around, do you see people watching full length productions? I see people face booking tweeting and playing video games or listening to music, not watching films.

mikemorel
03-14-2012, 06:31 PM
Walmart, Studios Launch 'Disc-to-Digital' (http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/gizmo/142645896.html)

...

The process of registering a disc will "take seconds," said our man in Hollywood David Bishop, once a Camden Catholic High and St. Joe's student, and now chief executive of Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. And it's designed to give aid and comfort to people for whom concepts like "cloud-based entertainment" make their eyes glaze over.

In fact, Disc-to-Digital is part of a larger Hollywood studio initiative called UltraViolet, likewise designed to give "added value" to consumers and keep them buying hard copies of movies. (While still quite robust, the video disc biz slipped about ten percent last year.) UltraViolet invites buyers of select titles (identifiable with a UV sticker) to register the purchase on line and then share the movie in streaming fashion among six family members and friends all registered on the same account. UV also allows a buyer to download and carry the movie around permanently installed on one device.

"Disc-to-Digital uses the same backbone, the same verification system as UV," explained Bishop, "but this (DtoD) is easier to comprehend and execute in a retail setting. And in time, we're hoping the Walmart staff will also be able to lead its customers through the UV sign-up and registration process."

Samsung recently previewed a Blu-Ray player that will offer built-in capacity for Disc-to-Digital file conversion transactions, though at first that operation will work only with conventional DVDs. Bishop couldn't explain the limitation "because Samsung doesn't talk to Sony." But he added that "the Sony PlayStation 3 and other devices can and will perform the same functions in the near future."

HD Goofnut
03-14-2012, 06:52 PM
Walmart, Studios Launch 'Disc-to-Digital' (http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/gizmo/142645896.html)

More failure models. DVD means SD.

TowerGrove
03-14-2012, 07:30 PM
More failure models. DVD means SD.

Unfortunately doesn't SD = good enough for most people? If I remember correctly few even have their HDTV calibrated to get true HD stretching standard def and getting rid of those pesky bars that are there to cut away from the picture. :)

mikemorel
03-15-2012, 03:01 AM
More failure models. DVD means SD.I didn't read it the way you are. I took it as "the Samsung player only works with conventional DVDs".

I read it as "the Sony PlayStation 3 and other devices can and will perform the same functions [as Walmart] in the near future."

In any case, we may find out soon, as David Bishop stated that UV support for the PS3 and other devices will be coming "in the near future".

bombsnizzle
03-15-2012, 07:00 AM
"Disc-to-Digital uses the same backbone, the same verification system as UV," explained Bishop, "but this (DtoD) is easier to comprehend and execute in a retail setting. And in time, we're hoping the Walmart staff will also be able to lead its customers through the UV sign-up and registration process." Walmart is leading its customers to Vudu sign-up. Vudu is what will be plastered into consumers eyes and brains, not UV. Walmart is intentionally putting the Vudu name in highlights and de-emphasizing UV.

Samsung recently previewed a Blu-Ray player that will offer built-in capacity for Disc-to-Digital file conversion transactions, though at first that operation will work only with conventional DVDs. Bishop couldn't explain the limitation "because Samsung doesn't talk to Sony." But he added that "the Sony PlayStation 3 and other devices can and will perform the same functions in the near future." That's nice. No need to work together on this. Let's just have everyone do their own thing. I am sure things will just organically come together on its own...:rolleyes:

I didn't read it the way you are. I took it as "the Samsung player only works with conventional DVDs".

I read it as "the Sony PlayStation 3 and other devices can and will perform the same functions [as Walmart] in the near future."

In any case, we may find out soon, as David Bishop stated that UV support for the PS3 and other devices will be coming "in the near future".
There is no way it is this hard to implement UV. It is, for all intents and purposes, just another "app". To have this much delay and scattered supported means there is likely some type of internal friction between the studios and CEs. Otherwise things would be going smoother than they have been since launch.

Fox is still without a UV title right?

I keep hearing about this Samsung player...any release date yet? Only DVDs? Brilliant move there.:banghead:

We have Flixster vs. Vudu. Paramount selling their own movies on their website.

It is a fractured mess just like the rest of the digital movie sector is.

Someone needs to tell Bishop that the public isn't going to know that Vudu and Flixster have the same backbone because all they will see are different logos and companies. Walmart's press release essentially intentionally buried UV references in lieu of getting the Vudu name front and center.

They are doing an absolutely horrible job of making UV appear to be one unified platform. I guess that is expected when companies don't even talk to one another...

Oh and still no Disney or Apple.

GizmoDVD
03-15-2012, 08:47 AM
Walmart is leading its customers to Vudu sign-up. Vudu is what will be plastered into consumers eyes and brains, not UV. Walmart is intentionally putting the Vudu name in highlights and de-emphasizing UV.

That's nice. No need to work together on this. Let's just have everyone do their own thing. I am sure things will just organically come together on its own...:rolleyes:


There is no way it is this hard to implement UV. It is, for all intents and purposes, just another "app". To have this much delay and scattered supported means there is likely some type of internal friction between the studios and CEs. Otherwise things would be going smoother than they have been since launch.

Fox is still without a UV title right?

I keep hearing about this Samsung player...any release date yet? Only DVDs? Brilliant move there.:banghead:

We have Flixster vs. Vudu. Paramount selling their own movies on their website.

It is a fractured mess just like the rest of the digital movie sector is.

Someone needs to tell Bishop that the public isn't going to know that Vudu and Flixster have the same backbone because all they will see are different logos and companies. Walmart's press release essentially intentionally buried UV references in lieu of getting the Vudu name front and center.

They are doing an absolutely horrible job of making UV appear to be one unified platform. I guess that is expected when companies don't even talk to one another...

Oh and still no Disney or Apple.

You sound like a really bitter Blu-ray fanboy. I know it's sad that the studios are no longer cheering on Blu-ray and put it on the back burner and instead embracing UV, but this is just getting a bit....sad.

Now you are whining about Disney and Apple? But Blu-ray was awesome and great when they didn't have Universal, Paramount and only some of Warner! :thumbsup:

ack_bak
03-15-2012, 08:56 AM
Curious Ack are you also skeptical of the iTunes movie walled garden standard? Doesn't apple want you to rebuy your movies to store in their iCloud. With music didn't they try to resell you a copy in the cloud that you may or may not have purchased for an upload fee? Thought I saw that being advertised sometime last year? Again how is UV and the Walmart move any better or worse than the iTunes movie store? Or do you dislike both services?

Towegrove, for music the Apple Cloud is actually very slick. If you bought the song or album via iTunes you can upload it to the cloud and then push it to as many devices as you are authorized (I forget the number, but want to say it is 8?). It is free. No charge. So I was able to push all the songs and albums my wife and I have bought over the last ten years or so through iTunes into the cloud and share with all my authorized devices. Very slick and free. And it is one app, and easy to use.

Now for all the other songs and albums you have in your iTunes library that you did not purchase through iTunes (i.e. songs ripped from a CD or downloaded from another provider) you can signup for their iTunes Match service for $24.99 per year that will let you store that content in the cloud and push it to all your authorized devices. For someone like me that has hundreds of ripped albums that is a nice service to have.

The nice thing, is this is pretty easy to use and pretty seamless as it is all done through one app that most of us are already familiar with, iTunes. No driving to Walmart. No buying a new computer or device. No jumping through multiple portals from five different companies. No limitations on your ripped content. If it is in iTunes you can put it in the cloud and share it.

This is what UV needs to strive to.
Seamless. Easy to use. No hoops. No Walmart. No forcing me to buy new hardware.

This is why I don't think Apple will ever be in a huge hurry to jump in bed with UV. Apple really tries to have a good UI, and a good user experience and not force people to jump through hoops.

I just think this Walmart solution is really clunky. I think having disc to digital capable players (like the PS3) is a better solution, but it is yet to be seen how it will work and if it is worth the cost of paying to move your movies from your disc to the cloud.

If the studios came together and said "hey, for $25 per year, we will let you move any movie on disc you want into the cloud no matter how many you have whether it be HD or SD". I personally have no desire to pay all that money to move my content from a disc to the cloud when I already own the disc.

And I am just not going to haul all my movies to Walmart. When I think of knowledgeable technical people and good customer service, Walmart is not at the top of my list :)

bombsnizzle
03-15-2012, 09:05 AM
You sound like a really bitter Blu-ray fanboy. Better than a bitter HD DVD fanboy.:haha: Winner>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>loser.

Can't you take your HD DVDs into Walmart for a UV copy?????? Probably not. They don't support dead, failure formats that no one uses.

I know it's sad that the studios are no longer cheering on Blu-ray and put it on the back burner and instead embracing UV, but this is just getting a bit....sad. Embracing UV? One of the few ways to get UV is WITH purchase of a bluray.

Unless you can show me Paramount is selling millions of movies on it's dedicated UV website.:what:

Now you are whining about Disney and Apple? But Blu-ray was awesome and great when they didn't have Universal, Paramount and only some of Warner! :thumbsup:

Amazing that your discussion always reverts back to dissing bluray. You simply CANNOT go a day without insulting the format, which shows how really, truly butter you are about HD DVD getting it's teeth kicked in and having it's throat slit by the industry.

Apple and Disney also didn't support HD DVD. FAILURE.

This is a thread about UV at Walmart. Stay on topic. The only reason bluray should be brought up in this thread is if in reference to taking a bluray in-store to get a digital UV version. Keep your bluray hatred to confined to bluray threads.

mikemorel
03-15-2012, 09:09 AM
Walmart is leading its customers to Vudu sign-up. Vudu is what will be plastered into consumers eyes and brains, not UV. Walmart is intentionally putting the Vudu name in highlights and de-emphasizing UV.All explained here (http://www.thewrap.com/movies/column-post/wal-mart-offers-ultraviolet-boost-begins-offering-cloud-service-36210):

Walmart gave UltraViolet a shot in the arm on Tuesday, all while barely mentioning it by name.

The retailer announced that it will begin offering a cloud-based video system to its customers via its online movie service Vudu.

However, noticeably absent in its presentation to media on Tuesday at the Roosevelt Hotel in Los Angeles was explicit mention of UltraViolet.

Instead, Walmart kept referencing the service as "disc to digital," as a way to familiarize customers with the concept of storing and accessing their movies digitally. "Disc to digital" will be compatible with Ultraviolet and will use the technology developed as part of the service.

Walmart executives were concerned that UltraViolet was too esoteric a concept to entice customers, according to an individual with knowledge of the situation.

In a release touting the launch of its new service, Walmart referenced UltraViolet as being in its beta phase. Walmart does not want to give consumers the idea that yet another video format has arrived in the US to compete with discs, despite the fact that Ultraviolet IS another video format that will compete with discs.

That's nice. No need to work together on this. Let's just have everyone do their own thing. I am sure things will just organically come together on its own...:rolleyes:Working together on products opens doors to antitrust litigation and intellectual property theft.

Fox is still without a UV title right?They said back in January they wouldn't release until Q4. So they are right on schedule. :yippee:

I keep hearing about this Samsung player...any release date yet? Only DVDs? Brilliant move there.:banghead:Reminds me of the Samsung BD-P1000.

We have Flixster vs. Vudu. Paramount selling their own movies on their website.

It is a fractured mess just like the rest of the digital movie sector is.The whole idea of Ultraviolet is to have multiple companies selling movies and players, and apps. It is fractured because it is evolving. I called it "early beta" in October. Walmart refered to it as beta Tuesday.

bombsnizzle
03-15-2012, 09:19 AM
All explained here (http://www.thewrap.com/movies/column-post/wal-mart-offers-ultraviolet-boost-begins-offering-cloud-service-36210):

Walmart does not want to feed consumers the idea that yet another video format has arrived in the US. That's nice of them. So now no one will know that Flixster and Vudu and whatever other UV service that pops up are interoperable. That doesn't help UV become the "standard". That was the entire point of UV.

Working together on products opens doors to antitrust litigation and intellectual property theft. If that were true then no standards committees would exist. UV has that page with all of their partners listed right? They signed up to support UV. The paid whatever fees/dues. They are supposed to advance it as a whole.

They said back in January they wouldn't release until Q4. So they are right on schedule. :yippee: Why the wait? UV is hot right now. The consumers are dying to get their hands on it! 1M accounts!!!

Reminds me of the Samsung BD-P1000. Yes. Funny how UV doesn't catch the amount of shit bluray did for having such a horrific launch.

The whole idea of Ultraviolet is to have multiple companies selling movies and players, and apps. It is fractured because it is evolving. I called it "early beta" in October. Walmart refered to it as beta Tuesday.Please show me the plan that will bring everything together. Please show me Disney on board.

Do you think it makes sense to be required to use a Flixster app to watch movies?

It is stupid to have all of these different services hiding the UV brand.

There should be a single UV app. Where all of your movies are. UV is the standard. UV is the format. The point is for UV to be THE gateway.

Right now UV access is like entering through a back or side entrance of a theme park instead of using the front gate with the big sign and flashing lights UV! UV!.

UV should be the focus. Not Flixster. Not Vudu. It muddies the picture.

ack_bak
03-15-2012, 09:22 AM
All explained here (http://www.thewrap.com/movies/column-post/wal-mart-offers-ultraviolet-boost-begins-offering-cloud-service-36210):

Walmart does not want to give consumers the idea that yet another video format has arrived in the US to compete with discs, despite the fact that Ultraviolet IS another video format that will compete with discs.

Working together on products opens doors to antitrust litigation and intellectual property theft.

They said back in January they wouldn't release until Q4. So they are right on schedule. :yippee:

Reminds me of the Samsung BD-P1000.

The whole idea of Ultraviolet is to have multiple companies selling movies and players, and apps. It is fractured because it is evolving. I called it "early beta" in October. Walmart refered to it as beta Tuesday.

So UV is a giant cluster&*%* that can only get better in time..

Or not...

The problem with UV, as I see it, is that UV seems to be at the mercy of the studios and they are not pushing for a seamless experience.

This is not how you are going to win people over to buy into UV. You only have so many chances to rollout a new service and get it right before you tarnish your name and reputation.

I would have rather that UV and the studios take the time to do it right than do what they currently are.

As for this "Walmart" deal. Do you honestly feel this will even make a dent vs the lost revenue the studios have suffered since the heyday of DVD? I give this service a year tops before it gets yanked.

bombsnizzle
03-15-2012, 09:36 AM
So UV is a giant cluster&*%* that can only get better in time..

Or not...

The problem with UV, as I see it, is that UV seems to be at the mercy of the studios and they are not pushing for a seamless experience.



It would be as if in ~1997 DVD was advertised at the hypothetical Flixster store as a "Flixster disc", and then at Walmart as a "Walmart disc".

Now, those discs are actually the same exact thing (a DVD), so your disc player will indeed play both "Flixster discs" and "Walmart discs", the only difference is the store that is selling them. Seems a little confusing no? "Hey Bob, can I play my "Walmart disc" in your Flixster player?"

So instead of just using a simple term, oh like "DVD" - with everyone knowing that DVD is the standard and works everywhere on everything, you have different services with different names and different hardware/software that make it unclear as to if they are actually the same format or not.

Kosty
03-15-2012, 10:09 AM
Well if Walmart stops the disc to digital service in the future the movies will still be in consumers Vudu or UltraViolet accounts.

TowerGrove
03-15-2012, 10:28 AM
Towegrove, for music the Apple Cloud is actually very slick. If you bought the song or album via iTunes you can upload it to the cloud and then push it to as many devices as you are authorized (I forget the number, but want to say it is 8?). It is free. No charge. So I was able to push all the songs and albums my wife and I have bought over the last ten years or so through iTunes into the cloud and share with all my authorized devices. Very slick and free. And it is one app, and easy to use.

Now for all the other songs and albums you have in your iTunes library that you did not purchase through iTunes (i.e. songs ripped from a CD or downloaded from another provider) you can signup for their iTunes Match service for $24.99 per year that will let you store that content in the cloud and push it to all your authorized devices. For someone like me that has hundreds of ripped albums that is a nice service to have.

The nice thing, is this is pretty easy to use and pretty seamless as it is all done through one app that most of us are already familiar with, iTunes. No driving to Walmart. No buying a new computer or device. No jumping through multiple portals from five different companies. No limitations on your ripped content. If it is in iTunes you can put it in the cloud and share it.

This is what UV needs to strive to.
Seamless. Easy to use. No hoops. No Walmart. No forcing me to buy new hardware.

This is why I don't think Apple will ever be in a huge hurry to jump in bed with UV. Apple really tries to have a good UI, and a good user experience and not force people to jump through hoops.

I just think this Walmart solution is really clunky. I think having disc to digital capable players (like the PS3) is a better solution, but it is yet to be seen how it will work and if it is worth the cost of paying to move your movies from your disc to the cloud.

If the studios came together and said "hey, for $25 per year, we will let you move any movie on disc you want into the cloud no matter how many you have whether it be HD or SD". I personally have no desire to pay all that money to move my content from a disc to the cloud when I already own the disc.

And I am just not going to haul all my movies to Walmart. When I think of knowledgeable technical people and good customer service, Walmart is not at the top of my list :)


You mentioning authorizing devices. Isn't that on Apple devices though. Can you play your iTunes store video purchases on another companies mp4 player? I don't think you can as that would be outside of the Apple Eco system.

ack_bak
03-15-2012, 10:46 AM
You mentioning authorizing devices. Isn't that on Apple devices though. Can you play your iTunes store video purchases on another companies mp4 player? I don't think you can as that would be outside of the Apple Eco system.

An authorized device would be anything that supports iTunes. Like Windows devices, Apple devices, etc. If Apple wanted to become a major player in the video streaming/cloud space they would need to partner with the major CE's and offer an app like Netflix, Vudu, etc. But at a minimum they would play on iPads, Macs, Windows PCs, AppleTV, iPhone, etc. So they would still have a massive consumer base.

All this comes back to the studios. Until they pull their heads out of their collective asses, and actually get behind something that consumers will want and use, we are going to have these fractured services and ideas.

The studios continue to be in the mindset of throwing darts on a wall to see what sticks, and this Walmart service is a good example.

I still think the idea of UV is a step in the right direction, but so far the execution has been poor, and I know I am sounding like a broken record here, but until the CE's get Apple, Disney on board and come up with a much more integrated and seamless approach, UV is going to have a very difficult time becoming the next revolutionary format.

Kosty
03-15-2012, 10:55 AM
The studios continue to be in the mindset of throwing darts on a wall to see what sticks, and this Walmart service is a good example.


Yep.

Baby steps here as well in trying to spin up UltraViolet.

mikemorel
03-15-2012, 11:00 AM
If that were true then no standards committees would exist. UV has that page with all of their partners listed right? They signed up to support UV. The paid whatever fees/dues. They are supposed to advance it as a whole.Re-read my post. Companies band together to develop specifications. It's up to each company indiviually to develop products and services based on those specifications.

Please show me the plan that will bring everything together. Please show me Disney on board.LOL. DECE is showing you their plan. If you have a better plan for the salvation of the home video market, then present it here. Maybe studios will listen to you.

There should be a single UV app. Where all of your movies are. UV is the standard. UV is the format. The point is for UV to be THE gateway.They can't have a standard app that will work on every company's platform, from cell phones, to blu-ray players, to PCs, to game consoles, to devices not invented yet. That would stifle innovation and reeks of anti-trust. All they can do is specify the format and let companies develop their own players. In the end, consumers will choose app that best suits their needs. It is the way free markets work.

Even with blu-ray, every CE manufacturer had to develop their own firmware or software (on the PC) that would playback blu-ray discs. The BDA specified the format, it was up to manufacturers to develop the "apps" to make their players come to life.

You complain that Apple and Disney are not on board and in the next sentence you call for a standard UV app for all devices. There is NO WAY Apple OR Disney would EVER get on board with that mandate.

bombsnizzle
03-15-2012, 11:43 AM
LOL. DECE is showing you their plan. If you have a better plan for the salvation of the home video market, then present it here. Maybe studios will listen to you. As a consumer I am perfectly happy with the $1.xx Redbox plan.

They can't have a standard app that will work on every company's platform, from cell phones, to blu-ray players, to PCs, to game consoles, to devices not invented yet. Why exactly?

Hulu Plus does. Netflix does.

The goal was to push a unified solitary digital format so the consumer feels justified their digital media is safe and won't disappear (like when so many other digital movies services have folded).

Does allowing Flixster and Vudu to carve their own name promote cohesiveness in UV? It promotes recognition of Flixster and Vudu, not UV.

That would stifle innovation and reeks of anti-trust. All they can do is specify the format and let companies develop their own players. In the end, consumers will choose app that best suits their needs. It is the way free markets work.I disagree.

Quite simply spreading out UV across plural services wherein some of the services like Vudu do not even promote UV is a hindrance to the goal of a unified UV digital format. Consumers will see the various vendors but not UV.

Even with blu-ray, every CE manufacturer had to develop their own firmware or software (on the PC) that would playback blu-ray discs. The BDA specified the format, it was up to manufacturers to develop the "apps" to make their players come to life. But they all do the basic task of playing the bluray format. That is standardized and uniform.

Vudu barely mentions UV. It is an afterthought to the Vudu brand. The UV format takes a back seat.

You complain that Apple and Disney are not on board and in the next sentence you call for a standard UV app for all devices. There is NO WAY Apple OR Disney would EVER get on board with that mandate. Disney agreed to the DVD standard. They agreed to the bluray standard. They have no problem agreeing to movie format standards. Except UV apparently.

sbuberl
03-15-2012, 12:52 PM
Why exactly?

Hulu Plus does. Netflix does.

The goal was to push a unified solitary digital format so the consumer feels justified their digital media is safe and won't disappear (like when so many other digital movies services have folded).

I used to believe a one single UV app would be best. And maybe in time, there will come another better than Flixster that's gets pushed as main UV player.

However, right now, I'll take UV wherever I can get it. UV is still a beta. Their website is near useless atm (other than adding users). No registering devices and downloads directly from their site. No CFF.
I'd be most interested in disc-to-digital when its doable from a PS3 or a PC. I want them focusing on those things first.

While Netflix is probably the most widespread streaming app on smart devices, the rest are quite a bit behind. Yes, they are on a lot of devices, but there's a still a lot they're not on. Hulu Plus just became available on Wii. Vudu finally reached xbox 360. Plus, one smart tv may only have amazon for vod, another has vudu, and another has cinemanow. And all those services have several years headstart on making deals to get on more and more devices.

So the question is would you rather UV focus on expanding availability of only one UV app (probably Flixster)? Between negotiating with device makers to get the app put on the device and developing code for new apps for each new platform, this would take years before it was available on lot of different devices.

Or would you rather have UV available much faster to the masses by enabling on existing services are already fairly widespread like amazon vod, cinemanow, and vudu?

ack_bak
03-15-2012, 02:47 PM
I used to believe a one single UV app would be best. And maybe in time, there will come another better than Flixster that's gets pushed as main UV player.

However, right now, I'll take UV wherever I can get it. UV is still a beta. Their website is near useless atm (other than adding users). No registering devices and downloads directly from their site. No CFF.
I'd be most interested in disc-to-digital when its doable from a PS3 or a PC. I want them focusing on those things first.

While Netflix is probably the most widespread streaming app on smart devices, the rest are quite a bit behind. Yes, they are on a lot of devices, but there's a still a lot they're not on. Hulu Plus just became available on Wii. Vudu finally reached xbox 360. Plus, one smart tv may only have amazon for vod, another has vudu, and another has cinemanow. And all those services have several years headstart on making deals to get on more and more devices.

So the question is would you rather UV focus on expanding availability of only one UV app (probably Flixster)? Between negotiating with device makers to get the app put on the device and developing code for new apps for each new platform, this would take years before it was available on lot of different devices.

Or would you rather have UV available much faster to the masses by enabling on existing services are already fairly widespread like amazon vod, cinemanow, and vudu?

I would rather UV have a unified app that all the studios get behind and support. A standard for the industry like VHS, DVD, and Blu-Ray before it. Now is the time to do it. Vudu makes up a tiny percentage of home video revenue based on the numbers we have seen. At a minimum, they could roll UV out on Windows and Android devices and then on the game console front get the PS3, Wii, and 360 within a year or less. This is nothing different than what Netflix and others have done. Then roll it out to Blu-Ray plauyers and other standalone machines and get a deal in place with Apple and Disney.

The industry needs a real standard that they can rally around and hang their hat on, and consumers want a standard they can trust and recognize. We are talking the average American here.

Kosty
03-15-2012, 05:00 PM
Right now UltraViolet is a key storage and rights access system with the actual servers for streaming and digital content from different sources. The services like Flickster and Vudu are using the UltraViolet system for management of access not for servicing the actual usage.