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Xbox360 and PS3 for Online Viewing in 12 Percent of US Households

PSound
11-08-2011, 09:43 AM
I have discussed before just how critical OTT devices are to adoption.

What is truly amazing is that the consoles have just barely tipped their toe in the water. Lots of opportunities for new content/channels are emerging for OTT.

The Games Console has become the most popular device for US consumers to watch online content on their TV screens. While PC remains the dominant screen for online viewing overall, transferring this experience to the big screen is becoming increasingly popular and is a key driver of consumption of filmed entertainment delivered via IP. Twelve percent of US households use games consoles to watch online content, more than the percentage of US households that connect PCs to TV via HDMI, according to the report from the Strategy Analytics Connected Home Devices (CHD) service, “Multiscreen Connected TV: Assessing Device Usage and Ownership.”

Strategy Analytics found that 65 percent of US-based weekly Xbox 360 users under the age of 25 access online TV shows and movies primarily via games consoles–even more than they do on desktop or notebook PC screens. “These findings indicate significant levels of consumer demand for such services. The upcoming Xbox TV launch for the holiday season will demonstrate an expansion of the partnership between the games consoles and the online TV and video industries,” says Jia Wu, Senior Analyst. Games consoles have already become the key media hub in US households.”

http://www.strategyanalytics.com/default.aspx?mod=pressreleaseviewer&a0=5133

bruceames
11-08-2011, 10:27 AM
Yes, the young are the ones that are using OTT more, while older people tend to use discs more. So the shift will be slow but steady. What will keep discs/physical alive and thriving (to a lessor degree) is those that need higher quality and more extras, as well as collectors for the packaging.

PSound
11-08-2011, 10:35 AM
Yes, the young are the ones that are using OTT more, while older people tend to use discs more. So the shift will be slow but steady. What will keep discs/physical alive and thriving (to a lessor degree) is those that need higher quality and more extras, as well as collectors for the packaging.

Yep.

Although the desire for packaging is becoming less and less. That is why I pointed to those user comments last week.

There are a growing number of people who are finding having to have a disc (or any packaging) more of a nuisance.

Quality is a big benefit to physical right now, but it does not seem to be a deciding factor. If it was, we would see far higher adoption rates of BD at places like Redbox and Netflix.

bruceames
11-08-2011, 11:00 AM
Yep.

Although the desire for packaging is becoming less and less. That is why I pointed to those user comments last week.

There are a growing number of people who are finding having to have a disc (or any packaging) more of a nuisance.

Quality is a big benefit to physical right now, but it does not seem to be a deciding factor. If it was, we would see far higher adoption rates of BD at places like Redbox and Netflix.

I'm not sure the desire for packaging is less than before, but we'll see. I agree that OTT content is less of hassle then changing discs and waiting for the Java/trailers to get out of the way. But there is an advantage to shelf browsing and looking at the packaging to decide what to watch.

As for OD rental, I agree that it's on the way out, and more than OD purchases. There's a huge difference in deciding what to watch while lying on your couch and watching it right away, as opposed to deciding at the grocery store or waiting a day or two to get it in the mail. The main advantage right now of OD rental is that new releases are available sooner. But when that goes away, it'll just be the price and quality advantages that keep it going.

HD Goofnut
11-08-2011, 11:03 AM
I'm 29 and I still prefer discs to streaming. This is probably because a BD is much higher quality than anything a streaming service can provide. My dad is the same way and he's 56.

PSound
11-08-2011, 11:08 AM
I'm not sure the desire for packaging is less than before, but we'll see. I agree that OTT content is less of hassle then changing discs and waiting for the Java/trailers to get out of the way. But there is an advantage to shelf browsing and looking at the packaging to decide what to watch.

As for OD rental, I agree that it's on the way out, and more than OD purchases. There's a huge difference in deciding what to watch while lying on your couch and watching it right away, as opposed to deciding at the grocery store or waiting a day or two to get it in the mail. The main advantage right now of OD rental is that new releases are available sooner. But when that goes away, it'll just be the price and quality advantages that keep it going.

It actually amazes me that the studios have not taken advantage of the inherent advantages of OTT rental.

If they priced new release rentals at say $3, they would severely harm the cheap OD rental businesses while immediately seeing a higher percentage of the revenue that is collected. There is really no reason why they could not work with Zune and Vudu (etc) to make that happen with the distributors making $1 per transaction and the studios collecting $2 per transaction. Volume would jump and both parties would benefit.


The current cheap OD rental structure sees far too high a percentage of revenue go to distribution and/or location rental. Basically to infrastructure costs that do not exist with OTT distribution.

bruceames
11-08-2011, 11:11 AM
I'm 29 and I still prefer discs to streaming. This is probably because a BD is much higher quality than anything a streaming service can provide. My dad is the same way and he's 56.

Blu-ray is going to need more young guys who think like you. :thumbsup:

Really the difference in convenience between streaming and discs is very small. Just a few minutes a load time and disc inserting to watch a 2 hour movie in much higher quality. And as TVs get bigger, that quality difference will be more noticable.

By comparison MP3s are far more convenient than CDs, as songs only last a few minutes and you can store a ton of songs on an MP3 drive and have them in any order.

HD Goofnut
11-08-2011, 12:47 PM
Blu-ray is going to need more young guys who think like you. :thumbsup:

Really the difference in convenience between streaming and discs is very small. Just a few minutes a load time and disc inserting to watch a 2 hour movie in much higher quality. And as TVs get bigger, that quality difference will be more noticable.

By comparison MP3s are far more convenient than CDs, as songs only last a few minutes and you can store a ton of songs on an MP3 drive and have them in any order.

I honestly can't stand MP3s. I gave them a chance a couple years ago and they sound awful compared to CDs. The bass is nonexistent, high ends are tinny, and guitars lack any real punch. You can thank compression for all of that.

PSound
11-08-2011, 01:06 PM
Blu-ray is going to need more young guys who think like you. :thumbsup:

Hehe...

We are definitely the outliers here.

Cygnus
11-08-2011, 01:30 PM
I disagree. You also have to deal with the annoying sometimes non-skipable theater and movie advertisements on disk. With streaming you go directly to the movie. Compression and bandwidth will only improve with time. Thus I never bought a BR player.

Really the difference in convenience between streaming and discs is very small. Just a few minutes a load time and disc inserting to watch a 2 hour movie in much higher quality. And as TVs get bigger, that quality difference will be more noticable.

bruceames
11-08-2011, 05:15 PM
I disagree. You also have to deal with the annoying sometimes non-skipable theater and movie advertisements on disk. With streaming you go directly to the movie. Compression and bandwidth will only improve with time. Thus I never bought a BR player.

Yeah, but the "setup time" is still only a couple of minutes, which is fairly small compared to the time spent watching the movie afterwards.

I do agree that forced trailers can be a pain, but fortunately they are not the norm. Also worth noting is that Blu-ray movies take much longer to load than do DVDs. So convenience-wise, it's a step back.

Cygnus
11-09-2011, 09:42 AM
You also have BR tech, video game, anti-smoking, etc ads. It would be different if the ads were shown the first time the movie is played. But it happens every single time the movie is played. I can't believe ppl are not outraged by that. That is why I don't buy movies and prefer to stream than rent them.

HD Goofnut
11-09-2011, 09:58 AM
You also have BR tech, video game, anti-smoking, etc ads. It would be different if the ads were shown the first time the movie is played. But it happens every single time the movie is played. I can't believe ppl are not outraged by that. That is why I don't buy movies and prefer to stream than rent them.

Get Any DVD HD by Slysoft then you can skip past all of the ads and trailers. It also turns any region locked BD into a region free BD. Even all of the various audio tracks remain intact. The only downside is that you lose the subtitles because they are separate files.