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samsung capacitors?

docspencer
04-16-2011, 10:47 AM
I have a 32" Samsung - replaced capacitors twice already and now no power again. Is it worth another $100 to fix again? Should I even consider another Samsung?

Loves2Watch
04-16-2011, 11:29 AM
I would say it's time to change brands. Consider Toshiba, Sharp and (cough) Sony. If you are considering a larger size TV like 42", Panasonic plasma is the king.

docspencer
04-27-2011, 08:10 AM
I hadn't thought of Toshiba or Sharp, but I was looking at LG and Panasonic. I have a 50" Panasonic plasma and love it. Leaning toward the Panny.

Now that I'm here I had a question about my current Samsung - in the past the problem was indicated by the dreaded red blinking light. Now it's a different sympton. The red light isn't on at all - no power. Then, a few days later the red light comes back on and all is well. In other words, it comes and goes so it seems the problem in intermittent.

What could this be?

Loves2Watch
04-27-2011, 12:43 PM
Intermittent problems are tough to diagnose but from your description so far I would guess it to be a problem in the power supply.

Yay for Panasonic. That is my number 1 brand to suggest...

ckone180
04-27-2011, 04:43 PM
$100 for caps? I was about to suggest using heavier duty ones, but if they're that high they're probably heavy enough. What's caused the initial issue needs to be resolved or you'll keep having issues. I'd agree its a power supply issue I think.

broschb
04-27-2011, 06:46 PM
I had the samsung capacitor issue on my lcd. When I had the capacitors replaced I was told a quality surge supressor(not the crap you get at walmart) would prevent the problem. So far I have not had any problems since adding one if. The capacitors can only take so much of a surge before they bulge, and the problems start. If you put in higher capacity, the surge is just getting through to other components.

This worked for me, if you don't have a surge suppressor that would be my recommendation.:2cents

Loves2Watch
04-27-2011, 07:07 PM
I had the samsung capacitor issue on my lcd. When I had the capacitors replaced I was told a quality surge supressor(not the crap you get at walmart) would prevent the problem. So far I have not had any problems since adding one if. The capacitors can only take so much of a surge before they bulge, and the problems start. If you put in higher capacity, the surge is just getting through to other components.

This worked for me, if you don't have a surge suppressor that would be my recommendation.:2cents

Capacitors are meant to take a high charge and store it. A surge suppressor will in no way affect the way a cap. functions. Someone sold you a bill of goods. Many capacitors fail because they are faulty which has been a problem for Samsung in the past.

ddeerrff
04-27-2011, 09:17 PM
What typically happens is that a capacitor starts to get a bit leaky (passes some DC current, which an ideal capacitor would not). That leakage creates heat in the capacitor. A hot capacitor becomes more leaky, making more heat. Eventually, the capacitor bulges and fails as an open.

A voltage surge *can* start this process, but usually it is just a poor quality capacitor.

Cure is to replace the bad caps with higher quality parts. If physical space allows, going to the next higher working voltage and/or temperature range can be helpful.

Sounds like docspencer may have a loose connection. Going in and removing and reseating all the connectors would be a place to start.

videomot
04-27-2011, 10:47 PM
There are spikes and then there are surges. These two terms get intermixed and do not (as far as I know) have any generally accecpted definitions.

A spike is just what it sounds like, a short in duration but a high in amplitude. Standard house voltage is 120 VAC, 60 hertz. A spike might be several times 120 VAC and much quicker than 60 hertz in frequency.

A surge will be lower in amplitude, maybe up to 180-200 VAC and longer in duration, perhaps a few seconds.

If my descriptions seem vague, ambiguous and not very definative, that is on purpose. How short is short, several times, longer in duration, ambiguous descriptions. When does a spike become a surge? These terms are difficult to define in this context.

Between these two flavors of events can be different combinations of spike/surge events. The two variables are amplitude (voltage) and time interval (hertz). Typically as one goes up, the other will go down. The higher the spike, the shorter it is likely to be. The longer the surge, the closer to our nominal 120 VAC it is likely to be.

Any consumer device that is properly designed should take into account "standard" deviations for a 120 VAC service and should be designed to tolerate those probable/possible deviations.

If you have replaced power supply capacitors multiple times, some thing is seriously wrong. Either with the TV design or with the quality of service from the power company or even with the wiring of your house.

You can try replacing caps that have a higher voltage rating. See what you can get your hands on and what will fit into the space available. I doubt getting devices with greater capacitance (e.g. more micro farads) will help.

Certainly a spike protector will not hurt. The higher the "quality" the better. Evaluating spike protectors can also be tricky because the specs can be misleading. (for what it is worth, if I had to offer a brand you could trust I suggest Tripplite)

Surge protectors also present their own problems. It is not easy to design something that monitors and maintains a solid 120VAC max on second to second basis. For consumers, see if there are any battery backup UPS systems that offer some sort of voltage stabilzation. I think most will also offer some type of spike protection too.

Considering the cost of quality spike protectors and battery back up units, a new TV might be your preffered solution. Then on the other hand, if the problem is with your power company or house wiring, a new TV might get blowed up as well.

Sorry I cannot offer a magic bullet for a solution. Good luck my friend.

ckone180
04-28-2011, 06:25 AM
Yeah, don't change th uf rating, just the duty. Like 330v 100c. Honestly , check the power cord for connections and the power supply.

docspencer
04-28-2011, 05:05 PM
First, thanks for all the advice and information.

Let me see if I can sort through all of this. The two times I took it to the repair guy, he replaced caps with bigger ones. The first time this intermittent problem arose, he gave me new power cord saying it was probably the prongs getting lose in the tv end of the cord. It came on after that - so it seemed that fixed it - but it did it again. That's where I'm at now.

From what I gather from all these posts, it could be a loose connection somewhere in the power supply and/or surges/spikes. I'm having trouble getting the repair guy to return my calls, so in the meantime I have a better protector than the one on the TV now. I'll swap that in and see what happens.

Thanks to all of you!

jack

zrxmike
05-02-2011, 06:28 PM
First, thanks for all the advice and information.

Let me see if I can sort through all of this. The two times I took it to the repair guy, he replaced caps with bigger ones. The first time this intermittent problem arose, he gave me new power cord saying it was probably the prongs getting lose in the tv end of the cord. It came on after that - so it seemed that fixed it - but it did it again. That's where I'm at now.

From what I gather from all these posts, it could be a loose connection somewhere in the power supply and/or surges/spikes. I'm having trouble getting the repair guy to return my calls, so in the meantime I have a better protector than the one on the TV now. I'll swap that in and see what happens.

Thanks to all of you!

jack

I am no electronics expert but I fixed my Samsung with similar issues for a cost of about 20 bucks including the parts and everything needed to do the job. The capacitors that cause this are about 1.50 a piece at radio shack.

I searched the net for "Samsung capacitor issues" and found a thread at a website called techreport. I would post the URL but I just registered to respond to this post.

If you read the thread, look at the pics, and have any common sense at all, you can do this. The vast majority of the people who have responded to that thread have done this successfully.

It took me about an hour start to finish and my tv has been perfect for the last year. This is a know issue with certain Samsung TV's. Read the thread and be enlightened, and save some bucks!

ckone180
05-02-2011, 08:17 PM
Good insight Mike. I'd also like to add that failing caps do not start or end with Samsung. These parts are typically outsourced, and the cost effectiveness of testing these so called cheap parts must be limited, as many manufacturers have had strings of them. Changing brands can often yield good results as they are a different lot and run. Also increasing the duty tends to help. Don't give up unless you're out of options, as it can save you money short term, and possibly net a long life. Who knows?

millwork400
05-03-2011, 09:13 PM
Then on the other hand, if the problem is with your power company or house wiring, a new TV might get blowed up as well.

The odds of house wiring or imcoming power being the problem is slim to none at best. All electronic devices are designed to withstand reasonable increases in voltage. I have had problems twice with the caps and haven't once thought about the incoming power. The caps are just undersized. Just my two cents.

videomot
05-03-2011, 11:26 PM
Have you confirmed the AC socket is properly grounded?

I suggest getting one of those three prong AC circuit checkers. And make sure yoru power is 100% correct.

The odds of house wiring or imcoming power being the problem is slim to none at best. All electronic devices are designed to withstand reasonable increases in voltage. I have had problems twice with the caps and haven't once thought about the incoming power. The caps are just undersized. Just my two cents.
I agree that power is not the most likely suspect. I think we all agree something extraordinary is going on.

When it comes to power, there are all kinds power sources used around the country. Some sources can be pretty provincial. If you have a subscriber (like a factory) on your part of the grid, they can cause all kinds of havoc on you power levels.

If you have components that are marginally specified, and power that has some excessive surges, the combination cause trouble.

Loves2Watch
05-03-2011, 11:26 PM
The odds of house wiring or imcoming power being the problem is slim to none at best. All electronic devices are designed to withstand reasonable increases in voltage. I have had problems twice with the caps and haven't once thought about the incoming power. The caps are just undersized. Just my two cents.

More than likely they are either poor quality or faulty.

zrxmike
05-05-2011, 04:18 PM
More than likely they are either poor quality or faulty.

Based on my experience in trading them out for one's with more capacity, I disagree.

Loves2Watch
05-05-2011, 04:24 PM
Based on my experience in trading them out for one's with more capacity, I disagree.

That may be your assumption but Samsung designed the TV with certain specifications and the capacitors were supposedly designed to meet those specifications for the TV to work properly (Samsung did not manufacture the caps.). They failed due to either faulty production/ poor tolerances or numerous other things that allowed them to prematurely blow/pop/die.

ddeerrff
05-05-2011, 07:03 PM
Like everyone else, Samsung bought the cheapest caps they could find that were spec't to meet their requirements. Cheap caps are cheap for a reason, and in this case it looks like Samsung (and their customers) paid the price.