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Lexus Hybrids?

TwoPlusTwo
05-25-2010, 09:14 PM
Does anyone know anything about the Lexus HS or RX hybrids? I have never owned a hybrid before, but leaning in that direction for next car purchase. They are similar in price to the Lexus sedans that I might consider if not one of the hybrids.

I'm not a car guy, and not going to purchase new car for a while...thought I might start preliminary research by asking if anyone knew anything about the hybrids.

Thanks. :)

amdgamer
05-25-2010, 10:36 PM
Does anyone know anything about the Lexus HS or RX hybrids? I have never owned a hybrid before, but leaning in that direction for next car purchase. They are similar in price to the Lexus sedans that I might consider if not one of the hybrids.

I'm not a car guy, and not going to purchase new car for a while...thought I might start preliminary research by asking if anyone knew anything about the hybrids.

Thanks. :)

If you are looking for a hybrid, I highly recommend that you at least consider a Ford Fusion Hybrid. I have been absolutely impressed with mine as I completed a round trip to Chicago and back on a single tank of fuel from Cincinnati. Two adults, 200 lbs of stuff on the back seat and trunk, 72mph average, over 40mpg average. I am currently averaging 40-44mpg driving around town.

While not everyone will like it, it also is a very sporty car for a hybrid and handles incredibly well.

As for the two Lexus hybrids you are looking at, the HS is based on the same hybrid system as the Toyota Camry hybrid. I don't know a thing about the RX400 though, although I oddly see a lot of college professors putzing around in those.

TwoPlusTwo
05-26-2010, 09:57 PM
If you are looking for a hybrid, I highly recommend that you at least consider a Ford Fusion Hybrid.

Errrmmm...

Basically I wanna choose from a Lexus hybrid, a Lexus sedan, or a Honda hybrid.

I've never owned a Ford, and don't know anything about cars. I am not a "car guy" and I never wanna have to service the car myself.

amdgamer
05-26-2010, 10:35 PM
Errrmmm...

Basically I wanna choose from a Lexus hybrid, a Lexus sedan, or a Honda hybrid.

I've never owned a Ford, and don't know anything about cars. I am not a "car guy" and I never wanna have to service the car myself.

The Ford Fusion was rated the most reliable mid-size car on the market, and Ford has become incredibly impressive under the leadership of Alan Mulally. Even if you don't want one, test drives are free and it will at least give you something else to consider. You have nothing to lose from just going and test driving a Fusion Hybrid :) The Fusion Hybrid was even called the most advanced hybrid on the market in an LATimes review last year, and are capable of the highest speeds of any hybrid on the market in pure EV mode(45-47mph). Of the midsize cars, the Fusion Hybrid is the most fuel efficient of all being rated at 36 highway/41 city.

Honda probably has the most reasonably priced hybrids on the market, although they will certainly be no Lexus. None of Honda's hybrids are full hybrids though as they fall under the category of partial or mild hybrid. Of the hybrids on the market, these are the slowest, although that is generally due to their small electric motors and very small(1.3 litre) internal combustion engines that are very torque challenged.

The Lexus Hybrids are like Ford in that they are full hybrids, and are capable of driving on just the gasoline engine, just the electric motor, or a combination of both. Partial hybrids like the Honda's(Civic and Insight) are only capable of running on just the gasoline engine, or with the gasoline engine and small 10-12hp electric motor in assist mode. With partial hybrids, you'll never have to joy of being able to cruise around in 100% EV mode in pure silence. I know it sounds cheesy, but it is intoxicating being able to cruise around a parking garage in pure silence.

If you have never driven a hybrid yet, I highly recommend that you make multiple test drives of many different models as they drive very differently than a typical vehicle. It takes some getting used to, and the CVT(continously variable transmissions) are interesting until you get used to them. Floor it, and you get no gear change as it almost feels like the transmission is slipping.

Be warned though, i'm a Ford shareholder(a small one unfortunately) so I have a conflict of interest here :p

Emil
05-27-2010, 11:22 AM
I've never owned a Ford, and don't know anything about cars.

Remember, the first car you bought you didn't own one previously like it either ...
There's a time when you need to try something else.

johns70
05-27-2010, 11:32 PM
Honda probably has the most reasonably priced hybrids on the market, although they will certainly be no Lexus. None of Honda's hybrids are full hybrids though as they fall under the category of partial or mild hybrid. Of the hybrids on the market, these are the slowest, although that is generally due to their small electric motors and very small(1.3 litre) internal combustion engines that are very torque challenged.

The Lexus Hybrids are like Ford in that they are full hybrids, and are capable of driving on just the gasoline engine, just the electric motor, or a combination of both. Partial hybrids like the Honda's(Civic and Insight) are only capable of running on just the gasoline engine, or with the gasoline engine and small 10-12hp electric motor in assist mode. With partial hybrids, you'll never have to joy of being able to cruise around in 100% EV mode in pure silence. I know it sounds cheesy, but it is intoxicating being able to cruise around a parking garage in pure silence.


You haven't read anything about the 2010 Honda Civic Hybrid.
It can run on just the electric motor when cruising around town at speeds below 35, and it can run solely on the gas engine at highway speeds. :p

amdgamer
05-28-2010, 09:52 PM
You haven't read anything about the 2010 Honda Civic Hybrid.
It can run on just the electric motor when cruising around town at speeds below 35, and it can run solely on the gas engine at highway speeds. :p

Not according to Honda's website. According to Honda, it is still a partial hybrid with an electric motor that works in assist mode. If i'm not mistaken, the Civic Hybrid electric motor is a 10-12hp motor.


http://automobiles.honda.com/civic-hybrid/features.aspx?feature=em

The IMA® electric motor works in conjunction with the gasoline engine and supplies additional torque in assist mode. The motor’s ultra-thin design allows it to be mounted between the engine and the transmission. The motor also functions as the generator for the IMA® system during deceleration and as a starter, quickly spinning the engine up to idle speed.

Emil
05-29-2010, 06:05 AM
Civic Road Test

http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/car/06q1/honda_civic_hybrid-road_test

Side note:
Remember when comparing electric motors they generate the most torque at 0 rpm. The motor may have a low hp rating but it still can have gobs of torque at low speeds but falls off considerably at high speeds.

TwoPlusTwo
05-29-2010, 07:41 AM
I'm not exactly sure what to make of all this, as in I don't really understand what you guys are saying about the Honda hybrids. :confused:

When I say "I'm not a car guy" I mean I know nothing about cars. I'm the sort of guy who takes a car to get serviced at the dealer when a light comes on and doesn't go off. :p

I really can't tell if the consensus here is that Honda hybrids are good or what. :what:

amdgamer
05-29-2010, 02:31 PM
I'm not exactly sure what to make of all this, as in I don't really understand what you guys are saying about the Honda hybrids. :confused:

When I say "I'm not a car guy" I mean I know nothing about cars. I'm the sort of guy who takes a car to get serviced at the dealer when a light comes on and doesn't go off. :p

I really can't tell if the consensus here is that Honda hybrids are good or what. :what:

Here are the cliff notes.

Full hybrids like Fords, Toyotas, and Lexus' can operate in electric mode, gasoline only mode, or a combination of both based on a very complex calibration that maintains peak optimization. These vehicles are far more complex and feature some awesome stuff like regenerative breaking where the electric motor basically runs in reverse when coasting or slowing down in order to charge the battery pack. Basically it is taking wasted energy and transferring it into something useful!

Partial Hybrids or Mild Hybrids(also sometimes called belt driven hybrids) can operate in gasoline only mode, or assist mode with both the gasoline and electric motor running. They are unable to run in just electric only mode unless they are at a stop light idling. These mild hybrids also feature an engine driven compressor so the engine must be running whenever you run the a/c or defroster.

If you know nothing about cars, I highly recommend that you start test driving every hybrid on the market. Remember that test drives are free! Don't be afraid that you don't know much about cars, as they all drive like regular cars do except they behave a bit differently. Just put gas in it and drive :)

TwoPlusTwo
05-29-2010, 05:51 PM
Here are the cliff notes.

Full hybrids like Fords, Toyotas, and Lexus' can operate in electric mode, gasoline only mode, or a combination of both based on a very complex calibration that maintains peak optimization. These vehicles are far more complex and feature some awesome stuff like regenerative breaking where the electric motor basically runs in reverse when coasting or slowing down in order to charge the battery pack. Basically it is taking wasted energy and transferring it into something useful!

Partial Hybrids or Mild Hybrids(also sometimes called belt driven hybrids) can operate in gasoline only mode, or assist mode with both the gasoline and electric motor running. They are unable to run in just electric only mode unless they are at a stop light idling. These mild hybrids also feature an engine driven compressor so the engine must be running whenever you run the a/c or defroster.

If you know nothing about cars, I highly recommend that you start test driving every hybrid on the market. Remember that test drives are free! Don't be afraid that you don't know much about cars, as they all drive like regular cars do except they behave a bit differently. Just put gas in it and drive :)

Thank you...Cliff Notes are exactly what I need! :yippee:

Anybody have Cliff Notes regarding the HS vs. RX?

Yes, of course we will test drive but we don't intend to purchase for a while. I'm just trying to pre-educate myself first. :p

amdgamer
05-30-2010, 10:23 PM
Thank you...Cliff Notes are exactly what I need! :yippee:

Anybody have Cliff Notes regarding the HS vs. RX?

Yes, of course we will test drive but we don't intend to purchase for a while. I'm just trying to pre-educate myself first. :p

I don't have any knowledge of Lexus as i'm mostly a Ford person who had a short stint with Honda, and Chevy in my past. However the Lexus HS sedan does have the same hybrid system as the Toyota Camry Hybrid does. If you want to save some money, don't discount the Camry Hybrid as it is roomier and bigger than the Lexus HS. The RX400 hybrid is supposed to be a full hybrid as well with a adapted version of their award winning V6. Both Lexus' are full hybrids, so you can use the cliff notes earlier and get a profile of what to expect.

johns70
06-04-2010, 12:06 AM
Not according to Honda's website. According to Honda, it is still a partial hybrid with an electric motor that works in assist mode. If i'm not mistaken, the Civic Hybrid electric motor is a 10-12hp motor.


http://automobiles.honda.com/civic-hybrid/features.aspx?feature=em

The IMA® electric motor works in conjunction with the gasoline engine and supplies additional torque in assist mode. The motor’s ultra-thin design allows it to be mounted between the engine and the transmission. The motor also functions as the generator for the IMA® system during deceleration and as a starter, quickly spinning the engine up to idle speed.

Go to your link, click on download a brochure, go to page 14 of the brochure and read it.

CITY CRUISING
At steady speeds below 35mph on level road and under light throttle, fuel injection can cease and the car can be propelled solely by the electric motor. Engine intake and exhaust valve stop opening to help reduce drag.

amdgamer
06-04-2010, 11:16 AM
Go to your link, click on download a brochure, go to page 14 of the brochure and read it.

CITY CRUISING
At steady speeds below 35mph on level road and under light throttle, fuel injection can cease and the car can be propelled solely by the electric motor. Engine intake and exhaust valve stop opening to help reduce drag.

Just so you know, a friend(more of an acquaintance) of mine has a Civic Hybrid(traded in his handed down first generation Prius) and I can assure you that it is not a full hybrid. The only thing it can do is shut off the engine while it coasts on a flat and downhill incline. This is a 10-12hp electric assist motor and is very limited in what it can do. It also requires the engine to be on in order to run the a/c compressor. It will run the climate control, but to my knowledge the compressor is not electric like on the Toyotas and Fords. There is a reason why the heavier, bigger Toyota Pious along with its bigger ICE motor gets better fuel economy. There is a reason why a 3800 lb hybrid like the Ford Fusion can get such incredible fuel economy.

Don't take my word for it, go do a search and you will quickly find out that Honda has NEVER sold a full hybrid as all of their hybrids from the original Insight were belt driven hybrids or partial hybrids.

Here is a review that I dug up from my archives from back when I was car shopping

http://www.thecarconnection.com/review/1041393_2010-honda-civic-hybrid

The system at work in the 2010 Honda Civic Hybrid actually has five modes that let the electrics and gas engine work together in various ways. In theory, the Civic Hybrid can run on electric power alone, but we never experienced it for any noticeable duration. The powertrain consists of a 93-horsepower 1.3-liter four mated to Honda's Integrated Motor Assist (IMA) hybrid system. The engine is assisted by a 20-horsepower electric motor sandwiched between the engine and transmission. The Civic Hybrid is rated by the EPA at 40 mpg city, 45 highway. This is marginally lower than the 2010 Toyota Prius, at 51 mpg city, 48 mpg highway. After 10,000 miles, the difference in consumption between the two would be a mere 38 gallons

mshulman
06-08-2010, 03:50 PM
Thank you...Cliff Notes are exactly what I need! :yippee:

Anybody have Cliff Notes regarding the HS vs. RX?

Yes, of course we will test drive but we don't intend to purchase for a while. I'm just trying to pre-educate myself first. :p

I think the only major difference between the two is the HS being a hybrid. The Hybrid also tends to be more fully loaded when comparing other models, I'm not sure if that applies to a Lexus.