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Horizontal Lines & Ghosting on Samsung LN-T4661F

Cavette
04-22-2010, 08:21 AM
Regarding a 2 year old Samsung LN-T4661F 46" LCD TV:
Starting a couple of weeks ago, three horizontal lines dividing the screen into four equal bands appear when the TV is turned on. The lines are barely visible on the left side of the screen and become more defined to the right. Along with the lines there is also ghosting that becomes more pronounced from left to right. This used to last only a minute or two at startup, but has now progressed to 15 minutes before the lines and ghosting disappear. Once they disappear, the picture is perfect. If the TV is left off for a couple of hours the lines will return.

Any ideas?
Thanks

PFC5
04-22-2010, 01:31 PM
As a guess it is likely a video processing board issue. Not sure which one though.

wotenk
05-13-2010, 12:22 PM
http://www.highdefforum.com/flat-panel-tvs/112604-horizontal-lines-through-display.html#post1043579

Issue seems to be a problem on more than one occasion.

standup4uright
02-27-2011, 03:03 PM
Regarding a 2 year old Samsung LN-T4661F 46" LCD TV:
Starting a couple of weeks ago, three horizontal lines dividing the screen into four equal bands appear when the TV is turned on. The lines are barely visible on the left side of the screen and become more defined to the right. Along with the lines there is also ghosting that becomes more pronounced from left to right. This used to last only a minute or two at startup, but has now progressed to 15 minutes before the lines and ghosting disappear. Once they disappear, the picture is perfect. If the TV is left off for a couple of hours the lines will return.

Any ideas?
Thanks
I too have had this problem with the very same model, it is most often improperly diagnosed as a t-con board issue by most who just want to provide an answer for the sake of there own ego at various forums. This is a manufacturing defect. I have been dealing with Samsung for over a month now and have been offered a replacement model of lesser quality(LN40C650L1F) at a prorated cost of $300.00 to me which I have not accepted as of yet. My TV began having this issue almost exactly 1 year beyond warranty period. Typically it will only happen when TV is cold(if temp in room falls to approx. 68 deg or lower). When cold due to naturally occurring shrinkage as with anything, the tab bonding contacts to the screen are broken and therefore gives you 3 thin horizontal lines across separating the screen into four quadrants vertically and blurry details of everything including channel info, menu info, etc. It goes away after several minutes of warm up time, as the unit warms up expansion of the panel resumes and contact through the defective tab bond is made and picture is back to normal. A quick test to determine this is if you gently squeeze the bezel(frame) around the panel at the top left corner approx. 2 to 4 inches from the corner(this is where the defective tab is located for this particular problem) the problem will go away until the unit is turned off and has ample time to cool off again. When you squeeze you are effectively forcing the tab bonding back together and contact again is made. Another way to diagnose would be to turn your thermostat in house up above 72 degrees or so and wait a few hours for the TV to acclimate to the temp(expand) .This is why if left alone for a few minutes to warm up the problem disappears. Consequently people who keep there homes on the warm side, say above 70 deg. don't often see this problem, but the more heat-cool cycles the units go through the more likely this problem will rear up its ugly head.I believe this defect will pop up eventually on all samsungs produced with the same tab bonding method or materials that were used for however long they were manufactured that way. Naturally everything moves(expands and contracts) through heat-cool cycles but proper engineering methods or materials should prevent something like this from happening for at least, lets say 10 years, the average life expectancy one would expect to get out of a $1500.00 or more purchase depending on screen size. Common sense would dictate larger screens would be more prone to this problem due to more movement and smaller less prone. Unfortunately there are numerous tab bonds all across the top of the screen(panel) and different ones affect different functions of the operation of the set, therefore there may be many other various problems people may be experiencing with there samsungs due to a failure of one of these tab bonds. They are often erroneously diagnosed as circuit board failures due to laziness on the part of the tech. I would recommend to anyone experiencing intermittent or any problems to gently squeeze all along the top of the bezel to locate a defective tab bond. As for dealing with Samsung, all I can say is good luck, it is difficult to reach their corporate office and even more difficult to get a resolution. I would gladly join in any class action lawsuit if brought about as the one regarding their capacitor issue disappeared once they sought to start addressing the issue and this was only after an absurd amount of complaints to the NJ BBB and consumer affairs websites. I think they realize that they have a huge problem with most models manufactured in the last 3-4 years(primarily due to using cheaper components as a cost reduction/profit boosting solution) and as with any large corp., are not willing to issue any recall as it is cheaper to just deal with angry customers on a case by case basis, very unfortunate for them as their sales will suffer terribly because most people research on the web before making major purchases in today,s world and thank god for that.

unspun01
04-29-2011, 02:15 PM
A quick test to determine this is if you gently squeeze the bezel(frame) around the panel at the top left corner approx. 2 to 4 inches from the corner(this is where the defective tab is located for this particular problem) the problem will go away until the unit is turned off and has ample time to cool off again.


Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

EricsLCDTV
07-27-2011, 06:03 PM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

My Samsung 40LCD TV was having problems with 3 horizonal lines going across the screen and dividing the screen into 4 equal sections. It happend mostly when it was cold, but would flicker in and out when the TV was warmed up.
So I used the method describe above - I also added the foam tape to the sensors on the sides. It worked great!!! Thanks a ton for the advice - the internet really can be useful sometimes - I let you know in a few days if the foam catches on fire from the heat:lol:

rmaclean1964
12-31-2011, 04:53 PM
This worked like a charm for my 3 year old Samsung LN46A650! Easy to do if you follow the step by step instructions.
At first the lines and strange ghosting would last a few minutes and then disappear, then the time it was weird got longer and longer over 6 months. I was up to 35 minutes yesterday. I was about to pick up a new TV on the after Christmas sales but now I don't need to.

I love the picture on this TV!

Thanks very much for the great fix!

Kennyp74
01-03-2012, 07:25 PM
A great big thank you to all the posters in this thread. I have been afflicted with this problem as well with my two year old LN52A650. I was getting very frustrated as the "warm up" time had progressed to 20 minutes or so. I finally found this thread and on new years day decided to dig in and see if I could fix it. 2 1/2 hours later and a $1.99 investment in water pipe insulation, the job was done. It has been 100% on every power up since. Thanks again! Ken

pynewbie
01-12-2012, 12:31 AM
I am pretty sure I have the same TAB problem discussed here and on other forums. Half my screen will be 'darkened' when I first turn on the TV and is taking longer and longer to warm up. This only started after we moved to our new house on Dec 1 of last year. This house is a little cooler (we live in Canada and the house is older less insulated) than our previous house and never experienced this until the move.

Does anyone think this could be because of the move (inadvertent knock to the TV during transit) or do you think it is because of the manufacturer defect.

I must say this is pretty lame of Samsung to not catch this or fix as it seems these kinda issues could have been resolved with them applying this foam during manufacturing.

Thanks so much for this post, hopefully it saves me a repair bill! If this works I think we all owe unspun01 a beer!!

Dprouty
01-14-2012, 05:04 PM
I have a 17" long x 2 pixel wide horizontal line starting from the right side of the screen progressing to the left. The thin line starts about 3.5" above the bottom of the screen. The line color is black against color or white against black.

Anyone with this same problem? I have a samsung LNT4061FX/XAA

jdm025
02-26-2012, 02:23 AM
I went through the steps (couldn't be clearer by the way) but it still did not work. I still have the lines even though I applied the foam. I did notice that there were four tabs going down the sides, but they did not seem to be bonded to any sort of circuit. Should I try it again and also apply an extra eight strips (four on each side)?

Should I just buy a Sony? :P

cflannigan
03-03-2012, 10:13 PM
I can confirm that unspun01's fix worked for my LN-T4661F. Thanks! The left side of my screen would be dark, segmented, and ghosted until the TV warmed up for about 1/2 hour. On my 46" TV, there was only about 1/8" clearance between the ribbon cable and the metal frame around the panel. I used double stick foam tape to apply pressure to the ribbon cable.

Attached is a photo of the top of the TV with the tape applied and a close up of one of the ribbon cables.

matty511
03-23-2012, 05:18 PM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

Well i thankyou,how great is the internet!!

i have the Samsung LE40A6561A(SERIES 6)
i have disconected the power & inputs,undone the 19 screws whilst the tv was upright,take the back off,then on the top left there were two ribbon connectors,one horizontal,one vertical overlapping,i have used a strong tape to secure these down & after two weeks of constant horizontal lines...hey presto... they have gone :yippee:
the back is still off the tv as i have only just repaired it & the lines came back faint once & a little tap sent them packing so may need further tampering(bodging)
What i have noticed is the very top left of the bezel , when pressed in the lines appear,so i might not bother putting the screw back there & will prob screw the back on as i have the tv turned on-will have to disconect briefly to do this
cannot believe some sticky tape has cured this problem...the roll only cost 59p & ive used approx 0.2% of it,so samsung could of saved a lot of trouble for approx 0.1p
I hope this helps somebody out there & i will update on progress
happy viewing :thumbsup:

matty511
04-04-2012, 09:03 AM
update... the tape:-although it works, when the tv warms up the tape expands so the strips slightly come away from the back of the tv leaving the equal lines again,since ive still got the back cover from the tv off i just rub over the tape i secured the strips with & the lines go again,i will have to look into packing the gap between the back cover & the strips with something more permanent than tape...

madeup
04-30-2012, 02:06 PM
Thank you all very much, I was about to throw my 40" Samsung away when I found your detailed fix, I followed your simple clear instructions and the TV is a good as new!

workky
05-09-2012, 03:43 PM
Well, i tried it. And mine still has the same problem.It seemed to make no difference what so ever, i wished it did fix it
anyone have anymore advice?

Thanks

workky
05-11-2012, 07:24 AM
This morning my TV was perfect, for about 15 minutes, then it started the whole line thing again.
Im not sure whats up, but now i have hope, i do know the foam pieces i put in were extremely tight. Maybe i need to back off on the foam and get a smaller piece to put in, i was using 1/2, but i think 1/4 would have worked..

Im using weatherstripping foam with adhesive on one side, I took lots of pictures if anyone wants me to post them ,just chime in
Im going to fix this thing today if it kills me, im going with smaller adhesive tape stuff and see how that works
Maybe the foam is doing something when it gets hot, i dont know.

matty511
05-20-2012, 03:18 PM
Damn lines are back!!
Nothing seems to make them go at the moment...thrown out of the window would :-)
I will report back any fix...fingers x...or get the professionals in...or buy a new non samsung tv.

matty511
05-21-2012, 06:51 AM
My advice is to follow unspun1,ive just done this & the lines have gone...unfortunately i cracked the screen in the process so ive stripped the parts to go on fleabay this week...gutted!!
:2cents Samsung can kiss my entire ass

Psychatog
05-31-2012, 12:30 AM
Much appreciated for this information sharing forum. I followed the direction of how to fix the problem based I've read so far:lol:. Using weatherstrip to press the lcd print strip really worked out great! All of sudden, my wife was pleased and kicked me out of the room after she saw that the LCD was working great!:lol::lol::D

mdl062573
07-01-2012, 12:25 PM
I did everything you said, plugged it in and still lines/double images. I then just took the back of the tv off and applied a little downward pressure at the top of the matal frame and they were gone, perfect screen. I then needed an ultra thin clamp to apply pressure or "pinch" the weather stripping foam together between the two metal frames. A simple black "pinch type" paper clip for large stacks of paper did the trick. If you know what I am talking about give it a try. This saved me from a new tv that the repair man said was shot.

DYZN
07-05-2012, 01:00 PM
Hey Guys, Im Doing eveything what you guys just said. i'm still trying to do this! So if anyone got pictures of how he did this or pictures of the foam i would love to see it! Thanks! :banana: :yippee: :cool:

DYZN
07-05-2012, 02:11 PM
Hey Guys, Im back again! What you guys said about fixing it, it didnt work :(

Mine Gets The Vertical Lines after 5-6 seconds, The First 5-6 seconds it is perfect! I really dont know what to do... Can somebody help me? otherwise i gotta throw it in the trashes :/

karufta
07-05-2012, 07:43 PM
Go to these 2 youtube videos and you'll see what you need to do to make sure it stays fixed.

(this stupid thing wont let me post url's till Ive done 5 posts so go to youtube and type in

1. " Part 1 of 2 How to fix a Samsung tv w lines / ghosting "

2. " Part 2 of 2 how to fix Samsung TV with ghosting or line "

and they should come up

These aren't real great quality sorry. but I think they get the point across ok.

Thanks so much for all the help! I would never have even tried this without such great instructions from this forum!

dalenen
07-09-2012, 01:45 PM
I too have started to experience this problem. It started with short periods until the TV warms up, however; as time goes on, it seems to be taking longer for the trouble to go away only to appear the next time the set cools down as you stated. I have a LNT466 1FX/AA 46" LCD Samsung.

I will attempt to contact Samsung about this issue. I also agree to join any Class Action Suites in the event I receive the same Samsung treatment as you did.

Just advise me of any pending actions at [email protected]

1William1001
07-21-2012, 08:53 AM
I have a LN52A850 It had ghosting/lines/white blocks. Over the last month, it was getting worse and worse, taking up to an hour to 'come back'. Had a tech come out, they diagnosed a LDVS cable. Another tech came to install the cable and told me it was the screen tabs and the Samsung repair was to replace the panel. Phone calls to Samsung were met at first by a refusal to offer any help (combined with constantly be put back on hold) and clueless CSR reps. Finally I figured out the VP of Service Operations email address and I wrote him. The called mt back and I actually got a guy that had some compassion. However... all Samsung would do is off a pro-rated price on a new TV. I paid close to $3,000 for this three years ago and now it is worth $600?? a 80% loss?? Sorry Charlie but they just lost a customer. I have three large flat panels in my house, all Samsung. I will not be buying another. I expected Samsung to step up and supply a new panel and I'd have to pay labor.
So... my choices were to live with the bad TV until it failed, bite the bullet buy a new one today or apply 'the fix'. I figured the worst case would be that I'd have to go out today and get a new TV. So 'the fix' was worth a shot.
One hour, twenty minutes and the TV is working. At first I thought the foam was to be applied to the panel. Then I saw the pictures and realized it does not go on the panel rather it goes on the circuit board.
My frame around the panel was too tight to fit 3/8" foam, I fit 3/16" and even then it was tight.Samsung should do this repair for people. I hope they learned a lesson and in new designs, they have done something to prevent delamination of the bonded connection.
Shame on you, Samsung, shame on you!

Ves
08-04-2012, 11:12 AM
I want to thank the folks that posted the fix for the ghost imaging and horizontal lines. I had a repair man tell me that the screen was damaged and repair would cost over a grand. Said it made more sense to buy another one. So I said what the heck -- let me try to take it apart and follow the clear directions that were provided. I can't thank you enough. The screen looks perfect again and there is no warm up time needed at all.

A piece of styrofoam and the power of internet saved me a bunch of money. Many thanks!

mikejensen
08-05-2012, 02:26 PM
Thank you for your clear repair instructions!

My 2009 52" Samsung LCD was ghosting in the right corner. I advise everyone to take pictures before unscrewing the parts during dismantle. There are dozens of screws and you'll forget were everything goes if you don't have pictures. There are little arrows next to most of the screws that need to be unscrewed. Make sure to place all the wires back in the original positions. TAKE PICTURES!!! I used the Home Depot black foam 1/2" pipe wrap and cut (16) 1/2" x 2" pieces and curled packing tape to hold them onto the LCD connector things that run along the top length of the front screen behind the frame. Had to press down hard to get the screws to catch onto the frame since the foam makes it bulge out a bit.

It now works perfectly! Thank you! You saved me $1000's!!! If I can do it, you can do it. Don't be scared taking about a LCD TV its actually not that complicated!!! Anyway you have nothing to lose if its not working correctly!

dj_dupa
08-11-2012, 09:34 AM
Thanks for these instructions, they have worked for me as well, on my Samsung 46" LNT4661fx. The band across the top, from the top left corner has now disappeared. I have tried previously replacing both the LVDS cable (brand new from Samsung), and I had also tried replacing the T-CON board, but this simple down-force solution was the only resolution.

However, now I am experiencing the negative image issue (search "Samsung LN32A450 Screen Problem.AVI" on Youtube to see what I am seeing) after repairing the ghosting/horizontal line issues. Has anyone seen this before, or been able to remedy it? I've found one solution where the guy covered the metal tabs under the two thin wafer-like boards at the top of the TV that are bonded to the actual LCD panel with electrical tape (I've also tried with foam tape), but this solution has not worked for me. I've also tried swapping the LVDS cable and the T-CON with my replacements, to no avail. I did not have this issue before attempting to resolve the original horizontal lines/ghosting issue. Did I mess up my LCD panel for good now by potentially damaging the 12 bonded tabs? I was very careful when taking all apart and moving the components around, but after spending many hours on this new issue, I cannot figure out what has gone wrong.

mikejensen
09-16-2012, 08:45 AM
Thank you for your clear repair instructions!

My 2009 52" Samsung LCD was ghosting in the right corner. I advise everyone to take pictures before unscrewing the parts during dismantle. There are dozens of screws and you'll forget were everything goes if you don't have pictures. There are little arrows next to most of the screws that need to be unscrewed. Make sure to place all the wires back in the original positions. TAKE PICTURES!!! I used the Home Depot black foam 1/2" pipe wrap and cut (16) 1/2" x 2" pieces and curled packing tape to hold them onto the LCD connector things that run along the top length of the front screen behind the frame. Had to press down hard to get the screws to catch onto the frame since the foam makes it bulge out a bit.

It now works perfectly! Thank you! You saved me $1000's!!! If I can do it, you can do it. Don't be scared taking about a LCD TV its actually not that complicated!!! Anyway you have nothing to lose if its not working correctly!

UPDATE: The black pipe foam heats up and shrinks and becomes flat after about a month reducing the pressure on the defective LCD tabs, which caused the ghosting problem to come back. My solution is to use those small felt discs that prevent your chairs from scratching your wood floors. Cut them in half moon shapes and use the adhesive backing to stick to the LCD tabs. I used (2) half moons per tab and turning one up and the other facing down (staggered). Make sure they are the same width as the tab. It seems to be working better against the heat from the display.

Cremon
10-31-2012, 12:35 AM
My lnt5271fx/xaa has a ghosting issue that has not gone away since it has cooled down outside. Also a portion of the screen is slightly dark. It used to fix itself but no longer anymore. Will this foam fix apply to my tv model as well?

nalgene5622
11-30-2012, 06:58 AM
I followed the instructions and now I have anearly white screen. I can see the faint screen image. I orginally had the black lines and now they are gone but have white screen. I used to the foam strips and followed the detailed instructions. Has anyone else got the white screen after going through the instructions if so were you able to fix it?

mhoran1071
12-04-2012, 05:41 PM
I'm having the same issues that you mention with a LN46B650 model and have gotten absolutely nowhere with these idiots. I did uncover the President and not sure of her title (maybe chief complainer officer). At least vent your frustration and tell them how you feel. My last email included the President Kim again essentially saying Goodbye Samsung.

President email: YKKim(at sign)sea(period)samsung(dot com)
Kristyn G: KristynG(at sign)sea(period)samsung(dot com)


Good Luck and if you run across any Class Action Suits, pass it on to me.

s3niorito
12-13-2012, 02:41 AM
can somebody please upload it on youtube? I'm not that good in electronics..pleaase..

kjnylin
12-31-2012, 04:25 PM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

Thanks to unspun01. The fix worked! I did end up with two very thin vertical lines on the right side of the screen. One green and one red. Not terrible noticeable and certainly better than it was.

Thanks again.

jrhaas
01-19-2013, 12:36 PM
could you guys actually see where the flex circuit had become de-bonded. I can't see anything. thanks

chachi49
02-08-2013, 05:22 PM
Thank you all very much, I was about to throw my 40" Samsung away when I found your detailed fix, I followed your simple clear instructions and the TV is a good as new!

Thank you all for the great fix! The screen on my 46" Samsung LCD TV (purchased in April 2008) recently started having the lines/double image issues and I was able to correct the problem yesterday by following the directions on this forum. I had a few screws left over, but, hey who cares...the problem is fixed and my wife is happy!!!

BAJAPACA
02-17-2013, 12:24 AM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...
The fix is legit...! Thank you so much! By the way I didn't take the IR Circuit Board out, only the cables described in the fix. With the help of my 12 year old son we got this done and the TV works like new. I did used weather strip from Wally World the Duck brand. Took us 2 hours or less and worked like a charm. Thanks again!!!

donproline
02-17-2013, 10:06 PM
I have 5 year old LNT5271 with the same problems. Took TV apart as per instructions. Bought 1/2" thick self adhesive weather stripping at Home Depot. Put everthing back together and works like a charm. To bad samsung uses cheaper parts. Once this TV finally goes will look to buy something other than Samsung Brand. Samsung lost my trust.....

April 20/13 UPDATE:Did fix 2 months ago. Ghosting & horizontal came back worst than ever. Finally decided to upgrade TV. Went and bought Panasonic TC-P65GT50 Plasma TV. What can I say. Wow what and impressive TV. Goodbye Samsung Hello Panasonic. Such and amazing TV. If anyone looking to buy new TV I would HIGHLY recommend Panasonic......

indrajitassam
02-23-2013, 11:06 PM
I also have similar ghosting and horizontal line problem in my 2 year old samsung LA32C450 LCD TV. When I found that if I apply heat to one of the horizontal lines on the screen side, color distortion goes off though lines remain. Then I think it has something related to temperature and I also followed these steps. But I found only 2 TAB bonding in my screen and that too on downside for which I was not able to check this with TV POWER ON. Though applied foam, my lines did not go. Does anyone have similar model and resolution to this problem?? Please reply for a solution with steps and images if you have for this model.

Thanks

LiftOff
03-23-2013, 07:54 PM
Similar screen problems. Ghosting and lines until the set warms up. Started about a year ago. Initially, 'warm up' was five minutes. Lately, 'warm up' is several hours.

At the top of the screen on my Samsung LN52A750R1FXZA is a long thin pc board that basically rests/floats and is held in place by the ribbon connectors that hook the screen to the driver hardware. Sixteen flat ribbons come off this board make a 90 degree turn down in the front of the set, behind the metal frame, and hook to the LCD panel. The ribbons can be slightly loose on either end of the ribbons.
Where they connect to the board or where they connect to the panel. The ribbons are only an inch or so long. Pressing down can help for one end of the ribbons. Pressing in, toward the back of the TV, from the front helps the other end of the ribbon.

Took the set down following unspun01's instructions. At first I inserted spacers to press down but that didn't fix the problem. For those spacer I found felt pads at Lowe's in the hardware department. They are the felt pads that go under chairs. I found one that was about two inches long and half inch wide. Luckily 16 came in the package. Unfortunately, as stated, that didn't fix the ghosting.

Took the frame off again. Back to Lowe's in the insulation department they sell the weatherstrip that you put around doors. I got the thinnest, 3/16 inch thick, and stuck it to the metal frame. Screwed the frame to the LCD panel and powered up. Works like a champ. Like new. Wife is ecstatic. She really didn't want to spend another $2K.

Ten bucks at Lowe's saved me a new TV, $2K plus. For me, and others, the problem isn't the screen, it's the connectors on the ribbon cable. Just go slow and take care when moving the screen. Don't twist the screen after you remove the metal frame around the screen as the screen can easily come out of the TV or break.

Dolfid
04-21-2013, 08:47 PM
Thanks to unspun01 for a fix on my Samsung LN52A750R1F - his great instructions are easy to follow and it works!!! - thanks for the help!!

Jonmango42
05-04-2013, 07:52 PM
TV: Samsung LN52A650

Problem: left side ghosting, bad color. Would go away after a few minute warm up. Warm up time got longer till it would resolve and resurface.

I followed the directions for the fix and my TV is looking much better at the moment.

Thanks for the help!

ButaneBlue
05-07-2013, 09:01 AM
40" Samsung Model LN40A630M1FXZA with intermittent ghosting when 1st turned on.

Thanks unspun01 View Postfor the help. I installed the foam strips and it has been working great ever since.

whatsup
05-10-2013, 07:58 PM
This was happening to me. My tv is a sony bravia but what my husband did by accident was to go to the format on the control and switch from 1080 to 480 then 720 and back to the 1080. He did this about 2 or 3 times through the cycle and then left it alone. All of a sudden the picture came in perfect. I dont know if it is a problem with the aspect ratio in the tv but now every time we turn it on we go through that cycle and the tv clears up. Yay, we dont have to buy a new tv. Just try it if you are getting these symtoms. it might work on yours also.

sacosta115
06-07-2013, 05:49 PM
okay so I'm new to the forum um I just picked up a Samsung T 4661 and got it on Craigslist because the last owner didn't like the ghosting lines at the top right hand of the screen the only thing I noticed is it did have some slight ghosting lines as well as a dark box after The lines would go away. so I only get paid $75 for this nice 46 inch LCD TV I was looking for fix before I bought the TV seeing as how I wouldn't have that much in it but to see if it would be worth that show at the present time as you can see by my pictures I have diassembled the. television. and I have applied the foam weather stripping and I wanted to see if you All I think that I have done this right I have placed a strip on each circuit ribbon in hopes that this will stop the ghosting I will post back after I have resembled thank you

eyewitnesss
06-18-2013, 03:36 PM
I have a Samsung LF40F86BDX/XEU with the same problem did this fix and so far so good. However a word of advice when putting the metal frame back on make sure that the screen is within the recess cut for it. I nearly broke the screen but just saw it at the last minute

adamoun
06-19-2013, 10:01 AM
thanks for sharing this fix, after following all steps now I've black lignes, but i've no ghost image

dagiov
11-16-2013, 11:44 PM
Thanks you unspun01. It worked on my Samsung 46 LCD tv.

GabiB
12-13-2013, 04:55 PM
Thanks you unspun01! I have the Samsung LE40A6561A(SERIES 6). After 3 tries, i manage to fix it almost perfect. But when it started to heat, it worked just perfect. Wow! I can`t believe it.:banana: You are awesome !

ScottG
02-08-2014, 02:59 PM
Thanks Unspun01

I was having the horizontal bars and dark patches on the screen. When I would squeeze the bezel around the top of the TV it would temporarily fix the distortion. Researched in this forum and found Unspunn01 solution.

Disassembly was not too bad, I used 2 layers of foam tape to hold down the 12 contacts along the top of the TV. Reassembled and the screen came back perfect. No longer have the horizontal bars and dark patches on the screen.

If you are having similar issues definitely try this.

twinspark
04-13-2014, 01:32 PM
Hi Guys
i have a Samsung le40a656
and i had the problem with 3 horizontal lines and double image in the upper right side..
i followed the guide with the 16 foam pieces..
i took the tv completly apart when i did it ..
and put it together agin it seems the horizintal lines are gone and the double image..
but now i have a new problem i got a Black vertical line 2-3 pixels wide in the left side and it aint going away..
any one has any ideas ?

mmacvicar
06-30-2014, 04:10 PM
Thank you unspun01! Your instructions we're close enough to work for me. I have a LNT4061FX/XAA, with the same symptoms everyone else mentions. Here's my modified instructions (difference in bold):

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
(I didn't have any metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield)
(I didn't have a capacitive touch button panel)
4)Detach the IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
5) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws). (I also had to remove a bracket covering the IR circuit board, see back_bottom_a.jpg)
6) Lay the TV on it's back (I used the back of the TV as a stand, because I wanted to be careful not to bend any circuitry sticking out the back).
7) The LCD frame comes in 4 sections, remove the top section
8) I used dense weatherstripping foam, cut one peice 37" long x 1/4" wide x 1/8" thick and attach to the inside of the top frame section about 1/8" inset from the bottom edge. This will press on the top-front-edge of the LCD if the ribbon-cable-to_LCD is loose there
9) cut another peice approve 37" long x 1/4" wide x 1/4" thick and attach to the inside of the top frame section so that it lines up with the ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connection all along the top (about 1/4" from the 90 degree bend/brake).
10) Re-assemble the TV
11) Test TV.


Mark MacVicar

SackDan
07-18-2014, 08:40 PM
Thank you unspun01! Your instructions we're close enough to work for me. I have a LNT4061FX/XAA, with the same symptoms everyone else mentions. Here's my modified instructions (difference in bold):

Mine is a LN40A55, and is almost identical to yours. Thank you for the pictures.

My problem is that when I turn on the TV it appears to only have 256 colors (do you remember the old days in your old computers? Exactly like that) and very dark image. After the fix described here, it seems that the time it takes to get back to normal is way shorter (it was around 15minutes already, now it took just 1 or 2).

When I turn the TV on, the screen flickers for about 2 or 3 seconds, and it looks like it is trying to fix itself. Then it just gets the wrong colors until it warms up. Even if I turn it off and on again very quickly the problem shows up and I have to wait almost the same amount of time to it to correct itself.

When I was applying the fix and the TV was laying flat on my desk, I turned it on and the image was perfect instantly. Once I put it back in standing normal use position, the image was screwed.

Thank you so much! At least I had some fun opening the set and applying the fix, right? :)

Any idea, guys? Maybe I should try the foam in another position or another place?

Thank you!

--SackDan

teapartytruth
07-20-2014, 12:44 AM
A customer gave me this nice samsung LT5271FX because of lines and ghosting issues. Unspun01's walkthrough just made me king of the castle!

I used 2" waterpipe foam i had a chunk of from another project. Had to fiddle with the thickness a bit, but after install there were no more flashing screens or lines! Perfect picture now!

Thanks again guys!

guyute74
08-23-2014, 04:11 PM
This thread is alive and well! I bookmarked it YEARS ago when my Samsung was acting up. The tv has been on my todo list since then (stashed in the basement). Finally got around to following the steps above and things are working perfectly now. For the first time - my house is a two TV household. I will never have to watch reality shows with my wife again!

rprman
10-01-2014, 07:19 PM
Regarding a 2 year old Samsung LN-T4661F 46" LCD TV:
Starting a couple of weeks ago, three horizontal lines dividing the screen into four equal bands appear when the TV is turned on. The lines are barely visible on the left side of the screen and become more defined to the right. Along with the lines there is also ghosting that becomes more pronounced from left to right. This used to last only a minute or two at startup, but has now progressed to 15 minutes before the lines and ghosting disappear. Once they disappear, the picture is perfect. If the TV is left off for a couple of hours the lines will return.

Any ideas?
Thanks

Try to change the source, switch to a DVD player and see if it is still there..

Tangelo
10-24-2014, 05:22 PM
Made an account to thank unspun01 for the fix. Also to add search results for future Googlers....

I have a Samsung LN-T4669f.

The problem was that the right side was very dim/dark. As it warmed up, it started to flicker/flash/strobe in horizontal bars. After around an hour, it would stay fully on (working properly). The above fix worked perfectly.

adam42
10-25-2014, 03:45 PM
Glad to find this thread and forum! I have the LN40D630 and tried the fix to no avail. I used the chair pads in place of the foam for top-to-bottom pressure and foam pipe covering for the front-to-back pressure under the metal frame around the LCD screen. My only problem was ghosting or a double picture is what I called it. I've never had any black lines and still don't after the "fix," only the doubled pictures, or ghosting rather.

Anybody have any ideas on why it didn't work on mine? I think, key word there, that I followed the directions pretty spot on.

Also, when I took the metal frame off from around the LCD screen, I never saw any actual processor boards (?) on the top. I just have a black plastic piece surrounding it under the metal. I put my foam/chair pads directly on the metal frame so that it would apply pressure to whatever is under the black piece. Did I miss a step?

Hoping someone sees this thread here soon and can help a fellow Samsung problem-tv-owner. :)

Thanks in advance!!!

TheIVJackal
10-29-2014, 04:29 PM
Hey Adam, I think your T-Con ribbon cables may need to be adjusted. Unlock them and play around with them with the tv on, see if the issues goes away. I remember seeing a video on youtube of a guy that put a thin strip of tape on top of the ribbon cable where the tab pinches down and that fixed it. Try it out and see if it works! Let us know if it does so it can help others :)
- Aaron

TheIVJackal
10-29-2014, 04:44 PM
I did the "fix" but now I have a dark bar down on the bottom 1/4 of the TV... Seriously bummed and I have pushed on all the ribbon cables on the top to see which one is causing it and I don't see a change! Please help, I'm pretty much out of ideas... Thank you.
http://i131.photobucket.com/albums/p294/TheIVJackal/c8f3374f-5bd6-454a-ba76-5585fb16492a_zps0c5aad2e.jpg~original (http://s131.photobucket.com/user/TheIVJackal/media/c8f3374f-5bd6-454a-ba76-5585fb16492a_zps0c5aad2e.jpg.html)

SingleNorthMum
11-08-2014, 08:11 AM
*snip*

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

*snip*
[/QUOTE]

Awesome thread!

Thanks so much for all the advice, and the step by step fix guide

my tv started playing up a while ago, and giving it a pat/squeeze worked for a while, but abou 6 weeks ago I had to give up and unplug it till I could find time to try a fix.

I now have a lovely big tv that's working again!!
(it does still have a slightly darker section to the left of the screen, but the lines, warm up issues and ghosting are gone!!)

2 happy sprogettes, and one happy mummy

thanks :D:yippee::D:yippee::D

rprman
11-22-2014, 05:29 PM
Regarding a 2 year old Samsung LN-T4661F 46" LCD TV:
Starting a couple of weeks ago, three horizontal lines dividing the screen into four equal bands appear when the TV is turned on. The lines are barely visible on the left side of the screen and become more defined to the right. Along with the lines there is also ghosting that becomes more pronounced from left to right. This used to last only a minute or two at startup, but has now progressed to 15 minutes before the lines and ghosting disappear. Once they disappear, the picture is perfect. If the TV is left off for a couple of hours the lines will return.

Any ideas?
Thanks
If you didn't move your TV lately, then most likely your screen is ok, however it may develop screen problem by itself,, but what I would do: I would replace the Tcon board, if it doesn't help - then it may be a screen assembly problem.

ScrewSamsung
03-07-2015, 06:40 PM
My 46" Samsung is doing the same thing, after only 2 1/2 years. I spent $3800 on this TV. I would expect it to last longer than this. I bought this TV at Best Buy, in that little room in the back corner where everything costs a fortune. I am so pissed off about this. This is not just some $1500 sale model. Samsung can kiss my butt. I have spent my last dime on their equipment. I am so mad, I don't think I will even try to try the repair listed on the first page.

jtgracey
04-18-2015, 01:50 PM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

Just finished and rehung tv. Looks great!!!! Thank you so much for the info. I owe you a nice cold beer!

carlberry64
04-26-2015, 04:26 PM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

Superb worked for me too :banana:
Thanks for the great post

Carl

rprman
05-05-2015, 08:47 AM
Regarding a 2 year old Samsung LN-T4661F 46" LCD TV:
Starting a couple of weeks ago, three horizontal lines dividing the screen into four equal bands appear when the TV is turned on. The lines are barely visible on the left side of the screen and become more defined to the right. Along with the lines there is also ghosting that becomes more pronounced from left to right. This used to last only a minute or two at startup, but has now progressed to 15 minutes before the lines and ghosting disappear. Once they disappear, the picture is perfect. If the TV is left off for a couple of hours the lines will return.

Any ideas?
Thanks
HI! Ribbon cables are the problem very often in this situation.Those ribbons may need to be cleaned and it may help, however cleaning may not help it they damaged.

WBA
08-04-2015, 05:22 PM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

You have another heart felt thank you ......

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

You have another heart felt thank you unspun01..........
Great post !
Tom

BayouRat
08-11-2015, 07:05 PM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

I just stumbled across this post. Today someone gave the TV away and I wanted to troubleshoot (my hobby). Your recommendation was spot on. Thank you!!

gcinelli
12-05-2015, 10:15 PM
Just did one for a friend. Worked great uses a single length across the top of 1/2 stripping.

Hodgey1
01-17-2016, 03:21 PM
Yes, definitely an LCD screen manufacturing defect. The screen on my 2 year old 52" Samsung LCD TV started having image problems on ALL inputs... When turned on, the video was segmented (3 faint horizontal lines) with a much darker area near the center of the screen. Most times the display would show one of the following: serious ghosting, clouding/hasing, poor refresh, image retention, or double-image in vertical direction (vertical and stretched vertical) on the left hand side.

As noted above by "standup4uright", if the TV is still assembled, squeezing the bezel front-to-back at the top of the LCD can fix or show the problem although if the TV is disassembled you can squeeze the metal bezel top-to-bottom instead.

With the back off the TV, to locate the fault I GENTLY pushed a plastic credit card (read: INSULATING) into the slit between the metal frames at the top of the LCD. It corrected or distorted the image each time (specifically top right, viewed from rear). This had the same effect as squeezing the bezel at the top of the LCD, but a little more specific by applying pressure to the hidden wafer circuit boards.

This is how I fixed my problem:

As viewed from the rear: Tcon = top center, power supply = bottom center, IR button panel = lower left, AV signal board = lower right.

You can do these in whatever order you prefer, but this is generally how to do it:

1) Remove base.
2) Remove back of TV.
3) Remove bottom speakers.
4) Remove metallic shielding "tape" at top of the t-con shield (DO NOT REMOVE T-CONN BOARD).
5) Detach connector at bottom left for the capacitive touch button panel.
6) Remove IR circuit board and long cable to AV signal board (you can re-attach later to turn on or test the tv).
7) Remove plastic decorative bezel from front of TV (several silver screws).
8) Lay the TV on it's back (the 4 wall mounting stand-offs were perfect to keep the TV flat on my large table...).
9) Completely disassemble the TV screen by removing the front metal LCD frame (just a bunch of phillips screws).

This exposes the wafer thin printed circuit boards at the top of the screen to which 16 individual LCD screen traces are bonded...

One or more of these lcd ribbon-cable-to-circuit-board connections has become detached (most likely the top left viewed from front)...Since these cannot be soldered by conventional means, we can "repair" the TV by applying constant pressure to keep the connection "bonded". Since there is about 3/8" space between the metal bezel and the printed circuit boards, I cut foam pieces to apply the pressure. The foam should retain their flexibility even with the relatively high heat from the screen backlight...

10) Cut 16 FOAM pieces (approx 1/2" x 1/2" x 2") from weatherstripping FOAM (or water pipe insulating FOAM if you have).
11) Cut 16 double-sided tape (1/2" x 2") and affix to one side of each foam piece.
12) Place each of the 16 sticky foam pieces on top of the printed circuit boards where the LCD traces are bonded together.
13) Re-assemble the metal frame to the LCD (from the top first, to squish the foam pieces and then apply downward pressure to fit at the bottom).
14) Replace all the screws for the metal frame.
15) Re-attach the IR button panel cable, plastic decorative bezel, speakers, and anything else you removed.
16) Test TV.

Remember, the foam pieces apply downward pressure to the LCD_ribbon_cable/LCD_circuit_board "bonded" junctions. Without it, any of the bonded connections can fail since they are ALL subjected to their own mechanical stresses right from day one at the factory (they are installed with a slight curve that puts a slight force on the bond)

In truth, you don't need to install all 16 foam pieces... On my TV, only the one leftmost bonded connection was intermittent (viewed from the front) but I installed all 16 of them in case more of them fail. Also, you don't even need double-sided tape but it sure does make the job easier if the foamies stay where you put them...

With the right tools and patience, this job can be accomplished in less than 2 hours practically for free.

My TV seems to be working properly for now... Sure beats having a broken TV, or spending lots of money on repairs or a new TV.

Good luck with your repairs. Post back with your success stories...

I just repaired my Samsung LN40A630 40" 1080p using this exact process. I had the same issue, three horizontal lines across screen with some additional dark spots that cleared up with time but lines didn't.

I used a roll of double sided foam tape I had and cut in half long ways in long strips.because it was only an 1/8" thick I triple applied. Once put back together it is working great! Thanks much for the detail, it went so smooth because of it.:yippee:

fredandtux
05-26-2016, 12:37 PM
I found an LN t4661f in our local dump and brought it home . The screen exhibited this same problem with 4 horizontal blocks and ghosting. I was able to determine that credit card pressure applied to the top left LCD printed circuit board did indeed solve the problem immediately. Removing the pressure and the problem returned. It does require a firm pack of the foam solution to resolve the problem as the fix. Kudos to the internet and contributors for supplying this solution.