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Sony 30HS420 Question

cards
07-25-2005, 09:38 PM
I just bought my first hd tv. Problem is no matter what I am watching there are bands on the screen. I have set the cable box to HD and all of the wires are set right. When I turn to HD channels it works (meaning that the pic is in HD) however there are always bars on the top and bottom. If I stretch the screen then the cable scroller on the bottom is cut off.

What am I doing wrong? Even DVD's have the black bands whether I zoom or not.

Someone who has this TV, what is the deal?

Cyberman
07-26-2005, 12:39 AM
I own a Sony 30HS420 and I have no problems with it. When I watch HD with my Scientific Atlanta cable box, the cable box automatically sizes the picture to Full mode. But you have black bars at the top and bottom? Have you tried resizing the picture by adjusting the vertical center and size options in your tv menu? Also try adjusting the vertical correction. If this doesn't help then you may have a defective set.

cards
07-26-2005, 06:26 AM
Thanks for the answer. When my tv is in full mode I can watch standard cable channels with no problem. However when I turn to HD channels and its in full mode there are still gray lbars at the top and bottom, and at times still black vertical lbars on the side. I imagine the black means that it was not taped in Wide screen format. Is there a way to watch the HD channels without the gray and without zooming.

Also I watched Pirates of the Carribean last night with black bars on top and bottom. I thought that DVD's were made to watch in 16:9. Isn't that why there are bars on 4:3 televisions?

rbinck
07-26-2005, 07:27 AM
Check out Bars, Bars and More Bars (http://highdefforum.com/showthread.php?t=4705)

cards
07-26-2005, 11:55 AM
I read the Bars... section and I have one question. Did anyone who owns this tv have to change the screen from 4:3 to 16:9 in order to watch DVD's and HD channels? Hopefully that is the problem and I can easily correct it.

rbinck
07-26-2005, 03:08 PM
if you have a 4:3 set, you probably do have to switch manually.
You might also want to check out this link:
http://www.dvdaust.com/aspect.htm

cards
07-26-2005, 06:20 PM
Someone who has this TV help me out. The gray bars on HD are driving me crazy. I have a comcast cable box, how did you plug your cables in? I have the HD cables going from the box into input 5, and the DVD player in 6.

Also I thought if you were watching in HD you couldnt zoom the screen?

Emsurfer
07-26-2005, 08:21 PM
Make sure your cable box output is set to 16:9 and NOT 4:3 for the TV. To do this, turn the box power off and leave the TV on. With the remote or box, press the "menu" button (may require a few tries). A menu will pop up on the TV screen allowing you to set up the box output.

RSawdey
07-27-2005, 12:01 PM
STB settings should be:

TVShape = 16:9
Y/Pr/Pb = 1080i
480override = 480p (or try 480i or OFF)

BrianO
07-29-2005, 05:26 PM
Someone who has this TV help me out. The gray bars on HD are driving me crazy. I have a comcast cable box, how did you plug your cables in? I have the HD cables going from the box into input 5, and the DVD player in 6.

Also I thought if you were watching in HD you couldnt zoom the screen?

"Pirates of the Caribbean" was filmed with an aspect ratio of 2.35.1 (Panavision) which is greater than the 1.78:1 aspect ratio of your 16x9 TV set. There is no way you can avoid the letterboxing (black or gray bars at the top and bottom of the screen) when viewing the movie.

The phrase "Enhanced For 16x9 Televisions" found on the box does not mean the film has been cropped to 16x9. It means that the 2.35:1 image has been stored on the DVD in an anamorphic (compressed horizontally) form that gets expanded back to its correct shape when you view it. While the DVD is viewable on either 4x3 TV's or 16x9 TV's, the image on a 16x9 TV is sharper, assuming the DVD player has been set up correctly.

Go to the setup menu of your DVD player and make sure the output is set up for 16:9 TV because the DVD player needs that information to process the image properly. If your DVD setup indicates that it is connected to a 4x3 TV then the player will expand the image to its correct shape, fit it into a 4x3 frame and send an undistorted, letterboxed, 480-line, 4x3 image containing approximately 270 scan lines in the picture area to the TV set. However, if the DVD setup indicates that it is connected to a 16x9 TV, then it will not uncompress the image but simply send the horizontally compressed, letterboxed, 480-line, 4x3 frame containing approx. 360 scan lines in the picture area to the TV set. Your TV set will then expand the anamorphic image horizontally to fill the width of the screen by automatically setting the screen mode to "Full". The image you see on the screen will be the correct shape but be noticeably sharper than it would on a 4x3 TV of the same quality, such as the Sony KV32HS420.

As far as other movies are concerned, the 2 most common aspect ratios used by Hollywood today are 1.85:1 and 2.35:1, both of which are greater than that of your 16x9 TV. The widescreen DVD versions of these will all be letterboxed but the letterboxing will be barely noticable on the 1.85:1 movies (e.g. "The Fugitive").

Most widscreen DVD's produced today are anamorphic but there are still a few that are not. For the non-anamorphic widescreen DVD's the correct screen mode setting for your Sony set is "Zoom".

So, forget about the letterboxing of widescreen DVD's. There is nothing you can do about it. Sit back and enjoy the movies.

I hope you find this information helpful.

Emsurfer
07-29-2005, 07:16 PM
Good point. I didn't notice that the DVDs that he named were anamorphic. So the gray lines top and bottom are normal.

BrianO
07-29-2005, 10:07 PM
Good point. I didn't notice that the DVDs that he named were anamorphic. So the gray lines top and bottom are normal.

The letterboxing on 16x9 TV's is normal for all widescreen DVD's that have an aspect ratio greater than 1.78, both anamorphic and non-anamorphic. This is true for almost all North American movies.

I gave the explanation because many anamorphic DVD's, including "Pirates of the Caribbean", use the phrase "Enhanced For 16x9 Televisions" rather than using the word "anamorphic". This leads many people to think that the DVD has an aspect ratio of exactly 16:9 and that it will fill the screen, even when the actual aspect ratio is also shown on the box. When the DVD does not fill the screen completely, they think, incorrectly, that there is something wrong with their TV, their DVD player or the DVD itself.

cards
08-02-2005, 06:49 AM
Thanks for the help. I had no idea that there were other ratios than the 16:9 and 4:3.

Brian, another question for you. I hear all this noise about my TV upconverting etc. I have comcast and the box settings can be changed to 480(i and P), 720p and 1080i. What do I want to watch standard cable TV on and for HD do I want it on 720p or 1080i?

BrianO
08-02-2005, 05:30 PM
Thanks for the help. I had no idea that there were other ratios than the 16:9 and 4:3.

Brian, another question for you. I hear all this noise about my TV upconverting etc. I have comcast and the box settings can be changed to 480(i and P), 720p and 1080i. What do I want to watch standard cable TV on and for HD do I want it on 720p or 1080i?

I have no knowledge of the Comcast box (or any cable or satellite box for that matter since I use antenna only) so I cannot give a definitive answer. There are too many questions that I would need answered before I could give any answers. (e.g. Does your box use separate cables for analogue and digital outputs?)

Brian

cards
08-03-2005, 09:15 AM
I use only the high def cables that Comcast provided me with. So the answer I think is no. I have one set of cables for Cable TV and component cables for the DVD.