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Recording HDTV to DVD, OR, an alternative

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Old 03-13-2009, 01:54 AM   #1
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Default Recording HDTV to DVD, OR, an alternative

I'm a science teacher. All I want to do is record the science channel to replay excerpts in the classroom. Most of the shows are not available for purchase. (I'm currently watching one - Naked Science.)
With HDMI connected I got the message that the shows are copy-protected and the resulting recording is not useful at all. With the HDMI cable disconnected, using only component cables, the resulting recording output is improved but clearly not HD.

I have:
Comcast HD service
Scientific Atlantic 8300 HDC
Panasonic DVD recorder: DMR-ES15 (Can record to DVD-RAM)

How do I record in HD on a DVD?

OR, if I need to start over, what equipment do I need to record in HD?

Thank you in advance,

-Lew
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Old 03-13-2009, 06:30 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewismatson View Post
I'm a science teacher. All I want to do is record the science channel to replay excerpts in the classroom. Most of the shows are not available for purchase. (I'm currently watching one - Naked Science.)
With HDMI connected I got the message that the shows are copy-protected and the resulting recording is not useful at all. With the HDMI cable disconnected, using only component cables, the resulting recording output is improved but clearly not HD.

I have:
Comcast HD service
Scientific Atlantic 8300 HDC
Panasonic DVD recorder: DMR-ES15 (Can record to DVD-RAM)

How do I record in HD on a DVD?

OR, if I need to start over, what equipment do I need to record in HD?

Thank you in advance,

-Lew
Your ES15 can not record HD, the best you can do is record from S vid and red/white audio. Not sure what you were doing but the ES-15 does not have HDMI or component input, only component out
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:06 AM   #3
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In fact no DVDR sold in the U.S. can record in HD.
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Old 03-16-2009, 07:37 AM   #4
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Also, it would be a copyrite violation to use the DVD's for anything but back-up.
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Old 03-16-2009, 09:11 AM   #5
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The Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR Video Capture device is the only way I know of to record HD. It will allow you to play the program into a PC for recording on the hard drive.

It comes with software that will allow the HD recordings to be written to DVDs for replay in a Blu-ray player in HD. I think up to 1 hour on a single density DVD.

Do you have a Blu-ray player and HDTV in the classroom?
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Old 03-17-2009, 07:33 AM   #6
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Appreciate your response to this. In Florida, I recorded from Comcast to this same DVD player -- the recordings are equal to HD - crisp, clear -- I still use them in class. Blu-ray/HDTV not needed. Up here in New Hampshire there is clearly a prevention placed in the signal of some kind preventing this recording, utrning it into such poor quality it couldn't even be displayed on a small computer monitor without distortion.

....I'm honestly wondering -- Hollywood/Congress -- all managed to approve a highly elaborate system to prevent recording in HD. This involved engineering, transmission and receiving standards, equipment standards, and the entire industry went along. Now a silly stupid science teacher who just wants to replay a great piece for his students.....can't do it. All because of the incredible third-world business of making copies of DVDs. In protecting their empire, they prevented reasonable use -- a science teacher from promoting their empire by showing a video in a science class for an educational purpose, and, no, the show ISN'T available on DVD so I can't buy it from them. I've purchased myself, from my pay, not school dollars, most of their science shows for use in class.

I suspect everyone is paranoid that "Big Brother", aka, Hollywood, even reads these posts. ...I need to stop going to movies.

Ok - so the solution is to take the signal into the computer. ....but I suspect since it is the same digital signal, that this signal is protected all the way.

I note the comment that this is "copyrite" [sic] protected. Use of material for educational purposes has always been permitted under US Title Code, now superceded by Hollywood Code.

--- Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR Video Capture -- ok, I'll look at this.

thanks for your time,

-Lewis




Quote:
Originally Posted by rbinck View Post
The Hauppauge 1212 HD-PVR Video Capture device[/color][/url] is the only way I know of to record HD. It will allow you to play the program into a PC for recording on the hard drive.

It comes with software that will allow the HD recordings to be written to DVDs for replay in a Blu-ray player in HD. I think up to 1 hour on a single density DVD.

Do you have a Blu-ray player and HDTV in the classroom?
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Old 03-17-2009, 07:36 AM   #7
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Joed32 -- thanks for your comment -- I've looked and looked for such a player....thought I was going crazy -- certainly Hollywood didn't pull this off that completely did they?? -- apparently so. We have an international agreement to protect Hollywood. My goodness, we can't even get that kind of agreement on Global-Warming. We should turn the problem of Global-Warming over to the Hollywood movie executives.

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In fact no DVDR sold in the U.S. can record in HD.
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Old 03-17-2009, 08:55 AM   #8
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Lewis,
It is true that you will not be able to record via the HDMI cable. That was a non-starter from the beginning. By law no CE vendor can produce a method of recording a digital (DVI or HDMI) signal in the US. The Hauppauge records via analog component cables at either 720p or 1080i depending on the signal received, which is allowed.

I can tell you that to date, this is the only way to get a consumer produce to record a HD signal from a set top box. Trying to use a standard analog input DVD recorder, while if possible, may produce an acceptable result, may not be possible in all cases due to some systems using the analog copy protection of macro vision. This you have most likely run into already.

So far there has not been any reports of HD signals not being able to be recorded via the Hauppauge device anywhere in the country. I can't be sure of NH, but I'd be surprised if you would have any problem.

Last edited by rbinck; 03-17-2009 at 09:01 AM.
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Old 03-21-2009, 01:22 PM   #9
What is HD?
 

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Default Recording HDTV to DVD, OR, an alternative

It also includes the alternative 1440 x 1152 HDMAC scan format. ... In addition,
recording and reproducing a HDTV signal was a significant technical .....
Finally, the HD DVD vs. Blu-ray Disc high definition storage format war for
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Old 03-21-2009, 05:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewismatson View Post
In Florida, I recorded from Comcast to this same DVD player -- the recordings are equal to HD - crisp, clear -- I still use them in class. . . . Up here in New Hampshire there is clearly a prevention placed in the signal of some kind preventing this recording, turning it into such poor quality it couldn't even be displayed on a small computer monitor without distortion.
That seems very odd.
If what you are wishing to do is what you used to do in Florida; that is, simply record (either SD or HD content) in SD format to a standard DVD, it should work equally well in New Hampshire.
I do just that all the time and have never had the sort of problem that you descibe.
Perhaps carefully check your connections, hookup, etc. to be sure that everything is as it should be.
There is no protection scheme that I have ever heard of that would result in the situation you are describing.
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Old 03-22-2009, 07:30 PM   #11
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Some of the standard-def DVD recorders have support for copy-protection built in. Sony is notorious for this. Do a search and you'll find numerous reports from people who can't record from HBO or other channels to Sony DVD recorders. That's the problem with a CE company like Sony being allowed to own movie and TV studios.

But rbinck is right - if you want to record HD from your satellite or cable settop box, the Hauppauge HD PVR is the way to go. You will get excellent-quality HD recordings that are nearly indistinguishable from the original, and you will bypass any copy-protection or DRM. It can even be used to record PPV or VOD content and bypass the 24-hour viewing limit on that content. Using the software that comes with it, you can burn close to 2 hours of HD content onto a 2x DVD at a good quality setting (9MB seems to be close to optimal).
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Old 03-23-2009, 10:51 AM   #12
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Ok - purchased the Hauppauge unit. Connected, made a recording. Now....to play back, the choices are:
1) buy a Blu-ray player,
2) use a computer. -- what....player do I use, am I using Windows Media Player?

--- To create a DVD disk, what do I save it as? ....I need to look around, read a little further, but I think I've got a method to create decent HD format materials for class. Thanks for your help on this and ....forgive me my ignorance...

-Lew




Quote:
Originally Posted by rbinck View Post
Lewis,
It is true that you will not be able to record via the HDMI cable. That was a non-starter from the beginning. By law no CE vendor can produce a method of recording a digital (DVI or HDMI) signal in the US. The Hauppauge records via analog component cables at either 720p or 1080i depending on the signal received, which is allowed.

I can tell you that to date, this is the only way to get a consumer produce to record a HD signal from a set top box. Trying to use a standard analog input DVD recorder, while if possible, may produce an acceptable result, may not be possible in all cases due to some systems using the analog copy protection of macro vision. This you have most likely run into already.

So far there has not been any reports of HD signals not being able to be recorded via the Hauppauge device anywhere in the country. I can't be sure of NH, but I'd be surprised if you would have any problem.
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Old 03-23-2009, 02:24 PM   #13
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You have several options for playing back the recordings. You can double-click the file in the Windows Explorer and it should play in Windows Media Player. If not, do a search on "Vista Codec Pack" and install the codecs that are needed. I had to do that on both of my Vista PCs. You can also play it using the "Play Video" applet in Total Media Extreme.

If you want to burn the program to a standard DVD, go to the "Create Disc" feature in Total Media Extreme. Open the program, click the Video button, and navigate to the video file. The third tab over has the Burn button. Use it to burn your program to a standard DVD. It will play in a standard Blu-ray player like the PS3.

The middle tab lets you edit your videos, but it's clunky and expands your video file. A better solution for editing is the freeware app H264TS_Cutter, which is completely lossless and makes it very easy to edit your videos. Let me know if you need instructions on how to use it.

Enjoy your Hauppauge HD PVR. I've had a lot of fun with mine.
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Old 03-23-2009, 03:26 PM   #14
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Ok - the Vista codex package worked and now playable in Windows Media Player. I think I can write to a standard data disk or store on a hard drive -- looking for the portability aspect -- take it to class with me.

But this works -- thanks for all your help.

-Lew


Quote:
Originally Posted by rcoleman11 View Post
You have several options for playing back the recordings. You can double-click the file in the Windows Explorer and it should play in Windows Media Player. If not, do a search on "Vista Codec Pack" and install the codecs that are needed. I had to do that on both of my Vista PCs. You can also play it using the "Play Video" applet in Total Media Extreme.

If you want to burn the program to a standard DVD, go to the "Create Disc" feature in Total Media Extreme. Open the program, click the Video button, and navigate to the video file. The third tab over has the Burn button. Use it to burn your program to a standard DVD. It will play in a standard Blu-ray player like the PS3.

The middle tab lets you edit your videos, but it's clunky and expands your video file. A better solution for editing is the freeware app H264TS_Cutter, which is completely lossless and makes it very easy to edit your videos. Let me know if you need instructions on how to use it.

Enjoy your Hauppauge HD PVR. I've had a lot of fun with mine.
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Old 03-23-2009, 03:31 PM   #15
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If you need an inexpensive player to take to your classroom, I'd suggest the Wester Digital TV HD media player for about $100. For more info see: Western Digital TV HD Media Player. It will play the recorded files by attaching a USB hard disk with the desired file on it. The media player will output 1080p via HDMI or SD via A/V connections.

Last edited by rbinck; 03-24-2009 at 09:30 AM.
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