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Dolby Vision HDR Movies

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Old 09-11-2015, 01:52 PM   #1
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Lightbulb Dolby Vision HDR Movies

One of the ways UHD BD promises to be hands down better than all other consumer home video formats is to offer High Dynamic Range and Wide Color Gamut on select tiles. Both must be encoded at the time they are shot to be truly effective and outstanding. WCG is no problem because all Hollywood movies are shot using DCI/P3 Color Gamut - 1 billion colors instead of HD's Rec. 709 of 17.6 million colors. But HDR is different. So far, only a handful of movies have been shot using HDR and the most popular method so far is Dolby Vision. Currently (AFAIK) the only movies being shot, shown and encoded in HDR are those in Dolby Cinemas using Dolby Vision HDR: http://www.dolby.com/us/en/technolog...by-vision.html

Here is a list of Dolby Vision encoded movies by studio:

WARNER BROS:

San Andreas
Pan
In the Heart of the Sea



SONY

Pixels
The Perfect Guy


20TH CENTURY FOX

Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials
The Martian
The Revenant


DISNEY

Tomorrowland
Inside Out
The Good Dinosaur
The Jungle Book
Star Wars: The Force Awakens



UNIVERSAL

Everest


LIONSGATE

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2


PARAMOUNT

Mission: Impossible — Rogue Nation


It makes sense that when studios begin releasing UHD BD movies with HDR and WCG (they go hand in hand) they will use the Digital Intermediates that were created for these movies which already have the Dolby Vision encoding. But there are other movies that studios have already created for UHD TV that have Dolby Vision encoding. Based on the age of the movies I assume they were never shot with HDR in mind but have been encoded with Dolby Vision HDR using the FilmLight Baselight system: http://www.filmlight.ltd.uk/products...verview_bl.php

WARNER BROS

Edge of Tomorrow
Into the Storm
The Lego Movie
Man of Steel
Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows
Chicago

IMO, it will be like studios creating post production 3D movies from 2D shoots instead of using dual camera rigs for native 3D. It works - but on a limited basis depending on the scene.

WARNING

You must have a Dolby Vision equipped UHD TV to see Dolby Vision encoded UHD movies (and a UHD BD Player with Dolby Vision chipset). So far, only the Vizio Reference UHD TVs have the Dolby Vision decoding chipset in them. I suspect at CES 2016 there will be many more announced. AFAIK, it will be up to the manufacturer of UHD BD players to have the Dolby Vision chipset in them. It is not mandatory - it is optional. We may see other announcements concerning Dolby Vision at the CEDIA show next month: Oct 13, 2015 - Oct 17, 2015

So what happens if you aleady have an HDR equipped UHD TV with HDCP2.2 and HDMI 2.0a but it doesn't have the Dolby Vision decoding chipset in it? AFAIK, the UHD TV will not display Dolby Vision HDR. There is no conversion hardware/software. Yes - this is one of the issues that has not been sorted out with UHD BD - multiple HDR formats (3: HDR-10 mandatory and Dolby Vision and Philips HDR optional).

Dolby Vision is a two-layer system with SDR in the base layer and HDR metadata in the enhancement layer, so it is backward-compatible with SDR displays.

I will continue to add movies that have been encoded in Dolby Vision and shown in Dolby Cinemas in the main list above as they are announced by their respective studios. These IMO will be the best of the best when it comes to HDR/WCG for UHD BD.

Last edited by Lee Stewart; 12-30-2015 at 03:42 AM..
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Old 09-19-2015, 11:11 PM   #2
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For the "Techno-Geeks" (I am proud to be one of them!)

When Dolby Vision movies are created, they are done using Dolby's Professional Reference Monitor PRM-4220:




This is an astounding monitor with the following specs:
  • 42" LCD
  • 4X the number of Full Array Local Dimming (FALD) LEDs - 1400 zones
  • Liquid Cooled
  • Peak Brightness - up to 4000 Nits
  • 10 and 12 bit DCI/P3
  • 1920x1080
  • $40,000 Price Tag

Years ago, there was a company called Brightside that invented the first FALD LCD using an incredible amount of LEDs to offer a brightness level 10X that of any other monitor. It was used to test the concept of High Dynamic Range for Video. Dolby bought the company and nothing was ever heard about it again . . .until last year when Dolby released the above monitor (called the Pulsar). When the Digital Intermediate is created for a Dolby Vision movie, this is the monitor they use for color grading and HDR. Dolby has spent well over 10 years perfecting HDR for movies and now home video via UHD-BD.



Last edited by Lee Stewart; 09-20-2015 at 12:17 AM..
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Old 09-20-2015, 07:47 AM   #3
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How is HDR in cinema different than on 'film'. I shoot HDR with my DSLR on occasions and am fairly into photography and via flickr and dyxum I post and view a lot of my own and also others photographs and a vast majority of the time HDR makes things look garish and exaggerated. When a desired effect that is fine but I am not sure I would want my ffilm looking that way. The closes reference I would have is Survivor which I don't think is shot in hdr but is color boosted and corrected in post to make it look very much like what my limited HDR experience looks like to me.

Typically when I shoot HDR it is due to lighting (either changing rapidly or subject both in light and shadow) and I will bracket a few EV below metered reading and a few above then composite.
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Old 09-20-2015, 10:23 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkkyler View Post
How is HDR in cinema different than on 'film'. I shoot HDR with my DSLR on occasions and am fairly into photography and via flickr and dyxum I post and view a lot of my own and also others photographs and a vast majority of the time HDR makes things look garish and exaggerated. When a desired effect that is fine but I am not sure I would want my ffilm looking that way. The closes reference I would have is Survivor which I don't think is shot in hdr but is color boosted and corrected in post to make it look very much like what my limited HDR experience looks like to me.

Typically when I shoot HDR it is due to lighting (either changing rapidly or subject both in light and shadow) and I will bracket a few EV below metered reading and a few above then composite.
From what I can gleam, HDR in Cinema expands the contrast ratio substantially, but it isn't "on" all the time. It is up to the director as to what scenes are HDR expanded - for instance, a daylight shot with the sun using HDR would make the sun very bright - much brighter than what you would normally see in a regular cinema, but a nighttime scene would have very little enhancement. Just enough to show details in the lower end of the contrast ratio that again you wouldn't see without HDR. Blacks would no longer be "crushed."

HDR is not 100% or 0%. It's a sliding scale. Again, how much enhancement is up to the director of the film. If you live anywheres near any of these theaters I would highly recommend you see HDR for yourself. Those that have seen movies in HDR wax lyrical about how good they looked.

Dolby Cinema (Christie/Dolby Vision HDR LIP, Dolby Atmos Immersive Sound)

Addison, TX, AMC Village on the Parkway 9 (coming soon)
Atlanta, GA, AMC North Point Mall 12
Burbank, CA, AMC Burbank 16
Eindhoven, Netherlands, JT Eindhoven
Hilversum, Netherlands, JT Hilversum
Hollywood, CA, El Capitan Theatre
Houston, TX, AMC Deerbrook 24
Houston, TX, AMC Willowbrook 24 (coming soon)
Kansas City, MO, AMC BarryWoods 24
Kansas City, KS, AMC Town Center 20 (coming soon)
Los Angeles, CA, AMC Century City 15 (coming soon)
New York, NY, AMC Empire 25
Vernon Hills, IL, AMC Hawthorn 12 (coming soon)
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Old 09-21-2015, 07:17 AM   #5
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What is HDR for TVs, and why should you care?

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Photo HDR isn't TV HDR

One of the most important things to know about HDR TVs is that TV HDR is not the same as photo HDR. Every article I've written about HDR has comments from people complaining about the hyper-realistic look common with HDR photography. These are two very different things that, unfortunately and confusingly, just happen to share the same name. Like football and football.

I wrote an entire article about the difference, but the main takeaway is that HDR for TVs is not a picture-degrading gimmick (akin to the soap opera effect). It is definitely not that.

TV HDR: Expanding the TV's contrast ratio and color palette to offer a more realistic, natural image than what's possible with today's HDTVs.

Photo HDR: Combining multiple images with different exposures to create a single image that mimics a greater dynamic range.

HDR for TVs aims to show you a more realistic image, one with more contrast, brightness and color than before.

An HDR photo isn't "high dynamic range" in this sense. The image doesn't have the dynamic range possible in true HDR. It's still a standard dynamic rangeimage, it just has some additional info in it due to the additional exposures.

A TV HDR image won't look different the way a photo HDR image does. It merely looks better.

I hate to belabor the point, but due to the two processes sharing the same name, this understanding is really the first, biggest hurdle HDR faces. Those with an open mind might seek out HDR to find out what it is, and be blown away by a demo -- and the demos are amazing. Those convinced HDR isn't worth their time, won't ever bother to see the demo and will poison the well (so to speak).

http://www.cnet.com/uk/news/what-is-...ould-you-care/
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Old 09-21-2015, 09:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post
What is HDR for TVs, and why should you care?




http://www.cnet.com/uk/news/what-is-...ould-you-care/
Thank you - that does a good job. Glad to hear it because I would not want my tv (or cinema) to look anything like photo HDR.
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Old 11-17-2015, 03:10 AM   #7
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Disney will release Star Wars: The Force Awakens in Dolby Vision theaters. This means that the movie will be encoded for HDR and WCG. The movie could be a UHD-BD release with HDR and WCG. I am guessing it will be released on disc sometime in the 3rd qtr 2016 figuring it will stay in theaters for most of the 1st qtr 2016.
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Old 11-18-2015, 10:00 AM   #8
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Vudu Launches Dolby Vision, Dolby Atmos Video Streams

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Vudu became the first video-streaming service to offer 4K Ultra HD movies remastered in Dolby Vision high-dynamic range (HDR) as well as movies with Dolby Atmos object-based surround sound.

Twenty-one Warner Brothers titles are available in Dolby Vision, and nine of those also feature Dolby Atmos.

The movies are viewable in HDR only on a pair of Vizio Reference-series Ultra HD TVs, the $129,000 120-inch RS 120 and the $5,999 65-inch RS 65 Reference. Both incorporate Dolby Vision and the Vudu 4K app.

The titles with Dolby Vision and Atmos are “Mad Max: Fury Road,” “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” “The Gallows,” “San Andreas,” “American Sniper,” “Man of Steel,” “Jupiter Ascending,” “Edge of Tomorrow” and “Into the Storm.”

The titles with Dolby Vision but without Atmos are “Vacation,” “Focus,” “Get Hard,” “Run All Night,” “The Lego Movie,” “The Great Gatsby,” “Sherlock Holmes,” “Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows,” “The Hangover” trilogy and “Magic Mike XXL.”
http://www.twice.com/news/tv/vudu-la...-streams/59490
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Old 01-06-2016, 06:49 AM   #9
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There is, however, very little widely available HDR content. Netflix is on track to stream “Daredevil” mastered in Dolby Vision later this year. LG will run clips of “Daredevil” on its OLED TVs during CES.
Quote:
Dolby Vision scored two more Hollywood studios as well. MGM and Universal Pictures Home Entertainment have committed to “deliver new release and catalog titles mastered in Dolby Vision,” Dolby said on Tuesday. No further details were provided.
http://www.tvtechnology.com/news/000...-at-ces/277690

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Old 01-11-2016, 01:16 AM   #10
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Will UHD BD offer a greater colour range on all films?
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Old 01-11-2016, 02:55 PM   #11
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Will UHD BD offer a greater colour range on all films?
Those UHD-BDs that are mastered in HDR will include WCG (Wide Color Gamut:10bit). If the movie is not mastered in HDR than it will have the same color gamut as DVD and BD: 8bit.

WCG increases the number of colors; from 17 million to 1 billion. It also increases the Gray Scale from 256 steps to 1024 steps.
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Old 01-13-2016, 06:53 PM   #12
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So far, only the Philips UHD-BD player supports Dolby Vision. The Samsung player only supports HDR-10. It is unknown at this time which of the 2 optional (Dolby Vision and Technicolor/Philips) HDR formats the Panasonic player supports (HDR-10 is mandatory)
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Old 02-02-2016, 10:56 PM   #13
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Netflix Embraces HDR

by Scott Wilkinson on February 2, 2016

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According to a recent article from Digital Trends, Netflix is bullish on high dynamic range (HDR). Neil Hunt, Chief Product Officer at Netflix, is quoted as saying, “I think HDR is more visibly different than 4K,” and I couldn’t agree more. The benefit of greater pixel resolution is marginal for “normal” screen sizes and seating distances, but the benefit of HDR is immediately apparent at any screen size and seating distance.

The article also points out that HDR goes hand in hand with wide color gamut (WCG), allowing TVs to display a larger palette of colors over a greater range of brightness. Again, the benefit of WCG is much more obvious than merely increasing the spatial resolution from HD to UHD.

Netflix now streams its original shows Marco Polo and Daredevil in Dolby Vision HDR, and HDR10 is expected in a few months. Hunt says that, starting this year, the company will shoot and master its original shows in HDR, and the final product will include the metadata for both HDR formats. He expects that five percent of Netflix content will be available in HDR within a year, increasing to 20 percent by 2019.

Interestingly, Hunt says that Netflix will certify Dolby Vision and HDR10 TVs, though he didn’t mention any specific models. I’m not sure why that certification is necessary; if a TV conforms to the Dolby Vision or HDR10 specs, all Netflix has to do is master to those specs, and all should be well. Of course, we know that the 2015 and 2016 Samsung SUHD TVs all implement HDR10, and the Vizio Reference Series will offer Dolby Vision (if it ever actually becomes available to buy), as will the TCL X1. The 2016 LG OLEDs and Philips 8600 will be able to display content encoded in either Dolby Vision or HDR10, a dual-format trend that I dearly hope will expand to other makes and models.

In any event, I’m thrilled to see Netflix embrace HDR so fully, and I can’t wait to check out its new content on an HDR-capable display.
http://www./netflix-embraces-hdr/

http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-th...iew-neil-hunt/
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