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Old 03-29-2008, 04:29 PM   #1
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Default picture adjust

hello,

i have a 32" LCD and i have questions about my picture adjust option that the manual does not describe very well.

under my "advance picture adjust" menu, i see:

DNR: low, middle, strong= settings i can choose
CTI: off, low, middle, strong= settings i can choose
adaptive luma control: off,on= settings i can choose

what is DNR, CTI and adaptive luma control? And what setting should i choose? also i have notice another feature i do not understand "Phase", what is "Phase"?

thankyou in advance for reading my thread and thankyou for your help.
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Old 03-29-2008, 06:30 PM   #2
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DNR = Digital Noise Reduction: set on low or OFF
CTI = Dynamic Color Improvement: OFF
ALC = Adaptive Luma Control: OFF

Phase = I believe this is "supposed" to provide a time correction for component video inputs.
On my set, it can be adjusted from 0 to 30; I can see no difference over the entire range with a variety of content.
From this, I assume it does nothing so I leave it at the factory setting of 5.
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Old 03-29-2008, 10:30 PM   #3
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What is phase?
Phase is a frequency dependent time delay. If all frequencies in a sound wave (music, for instance), are delayed by the same amount as they pass through a device, we call that device "phase linear." A digital delay has this characteristic—it simply delays the sound as a whole, without altering the relationships of frequencies to each other. The human ear is insensitive to this kind of phase change of delay, as long as the delay is constant and we don't have another signal to reference it to. The audio from a CD-player is always delayed due to processing, for instance, but it has no effect on our listening enjoyment.

Relative phase
Now, even if the phase is linear (simply an overall delay), we can easily detect a phase difference if we have a reference. For instance, you can get closer to one of your stereo speakers than the other; even if you use the stereo balance control to even the relative loudness between speakers, it won't sound the same as being equidistance between them.

Another obvious case is when we have a direct reference to compare to. When you delay music and mix it with the un-delayed version, for instance, it's easy to hear the effect; short delays cause frequency-dependent cancellation between the two signals, while longer delays result in an obvious echo.

If you connect one of your stereo speakers up backwards, inverting the signal, you'll get phase cancellation between many harmonic components simultaneously as they cancel in the air. This is particularly noticeable with mono input and at low frequencies, where the distance between the speakers has less effect.
http://www.earlevel.com/Digital%20Audio/Phase.html
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Old 03-30-2008, 12:00 AM   #4
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by default my Tv sets itself like this

DNR: low
CTI: middle
ALC: On

please explain why/benefit of having my settings like this,

DNR = Digital Noise Reduction: set on low or OFF
CTI = Dynamic Color Improvement: OFF
ALC = Adaptive Luma Control: OFF

thankyou both for your replies
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Old 03-30-2008, 08:47 AM   #5
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If you are going to calibrate your display it is best to turn off all factory presets....think of it as creating a painting and starting with a blank page...or more ideally a 6500k temp page as opposed to starting with a page with elements already added (factory presets).
after calibrating (and I use this term lightly) to a level you are happy with then you can try the various factory presets and see what desired effect, if any they have on your calibrated, (adjusted) display...

keep in mind that a well calibrated set at first appears less than desirable to the viewer as we are so accustomed to seeing sets that are on full torch mode it takes time for the brain to adjust to what is a more natural and pleasing viewing experience.....

Last edited by pappylap; 03-30-2008 at 08:55 AM.
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Old 03-30-2008, 09:16 AM   #6
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Great posts papster.
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Old 03-30-2008, 11:54 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supernoob View Post
please explain why/benefit of having my settings like this,

DNR = Digital Noise Reduction: set on low or OFF
CTI = Dynamic Color Improvement: OFF
ALC = Adaptive Luma Control: OFF

thankyou both for your replies
First, there's no sure way to even know what they do.

DNR: in the "old days" the original incarnation of DNR was to remove noise from analog signals, primarily over-the-air or video tapes.
In some of its newer incarnations, it is suggested that there is some noise in digital content which can be "removed" or "reduced".
So the question is which do you have (don't expect your User Manual to tell you) and does it actually do anything?
Try adjusting it while watching various content; I'll bet you won't see any difference in the picture, so just turn it off.

CTI: If anything, this will somehow override your basic color adjustment, including color temperature, saturation and tint.
If things are set correctly in the first place, it'll just screw them up;
if things are not quite "right" it is still more likely to screw it up further.

ALC: Seems to usually try to brighten or darken certian areas of displayed content . . . isn't that what "settings" are for?

It's a bit like a camera that can auto-focus and auto-exposure; or you can manually focus and set the shutter speed and f-stop manually.
You will always get the better picture by avoiding the "autos" and properly using the manual settings.

And, as has been previously posted, if you try to calibrate your set with these controls "ON" they may, in some manner, override your attempts to properly calibrate your settings.

Last edited by Scottnot; 03-30-2008 at 11:57 AM.
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