High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource

Go Back   High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource > High Definition Viewing Mediums, HDTVs > Flat-Panel TVs
Rules HDTV Forum Gallery LINK TO US! RSS - High Def Forum AddThis Feed Button AddThis Social Bookmark Button Groups

Flat-Panel TVs Plasma, LCD RSS - Flat-Panel TVs

Calibration discs vs D-Nice settings/offsets???

Reply
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-27-2011, 11:26 AM   #1
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 162
Default Calibration discs vs D-Nice settings/offsets???

Will calibration discs make a HUGE difference from OOTB settings? They do not adjust offsets.


If I bought a new Panasonic, which would give me better results:

A calibration disc, or D-Nice's break-in settings/offsets?
mbec2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 01:32 PM   #2
Former Super Moderator
 
Loves2Watch's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: In Flux
Posts: 20,284
Default

That really depends. A calibration disc will allow you to adjust the brightness, contrast, color, tint and sharpness in your lighting environment. The settings from D-Nice cannot take into account your ambient lighting nor can they account for any differences in your display from the unit he arrived at those settings on. As each and every display is different settings from others may or may not make your set look good.
__________________
It's always time for pie
Live everyday as if it was your last and plan on living forever...
Loves2Watch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 06:13 PM   #3
Progress Not Perfection
 

Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,715
Default

I agree that using anyone's settings is sort of a crap shoot because no two sets are the same and ambient conditions differ.

Also agree that a calibration disc will allow for proper adjustment of brightness (black level) and tint.

As for contrast (white level) all the disc will do is tell you at what level your whites will start to wash out - once that value is known, just adjust it for most comfortable viewing at ambient conditions, usually considerably lower than the maximum level determined by the calibration disc, but absolutely never higher.

Similar situation for color (saturation): the calibration disc will yield an "optimum" setting, but differences in content may have you tweeking it up or down from time to time to get a picture that is pleasant to you.
__________________
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Charles Krug, 1978 Vintage Selection, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon
Beringer, 1980, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon Port
Morano, 1980 Vintage Port
Beaulieu Vinyards, 1982 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon
Stratford, 1983 Merlot
Chateau La France, 1986 St. Emilion
Sutter Home, 1982 Napa Valley Zinfandel


The lonesome sipper
Scottnot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 06:18 PM   #4
HDF SUPER-MODERATOR
 
ImRizzo's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Brooklyn & Eastern Long Island, NY ....It's not a place, it's an Attitude and a NY State of Mind !!
Posts: 21,173
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottnot View Post
I agree that using anyone's settings is sort of a crap shoot because no two sets are the same and ambient conditions differ.

Also agree that a calibration disc will allow for proper adjustment of brightness (black level) and tint.

As for contrast (white level) all the disc will do is tell you at what level your whites will start to wash out - once that value is known, just adjust it for most comfortable viewing at ambient conditions, usually considerably lower than the maximum level determined by the calibration disc, but absolutely never higher.

Similar situation for color (saturation): the calibration disc will yield an "optimum" setting, but differences in content may have you tweeking it up or down from time to time to get a picture that is pleasant to you.
When I did the calibration on my XBR8 I found myself doing the Cali, then going back in because when adjusting one section and then going back to a previous setting it was no longer accurate so I would have to tweak it again. I had to do this numerous times before I achieved my final setup.
__________________
Sent from my Fisher Price touch&talk phone~using ITouchmyself II


SonyXBR929-SonyXBR8-Denon 3311CI-Mirage V2 w/S10 Sub-Oppo93-DVP5000-SAHDDVR-Harmony1100 ~ Rizz' HD Toys*link
ImRizzo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2011, 09:12 PM   #5
ISF Calibrator
 
dsskid's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 5,020
Default

In order for you to be able to use D-Nice's setting and to have a chance for them being accurate, you'd need to follow his panel aging procedure exactly.
__________________
Displays are like 100% cotton t-shirts. Always buy a size larger than you think you'll need, because they tend to shrink over time.

Professional reviews of displays are an excellent tool, but the final decision should come from using your own eyes.




Living Room - Panasonic TH58PZ700U, Panasonic DMP-BDT215, Denon AVR-1911
Man-Cave - Pioneer Kuro Elite Pro-111FD, Pioneer Kuro BDP-320, Denon AVR-591BA, PS3

RIP L2W, PFC5 & Kosty
dsskid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2011, 08:14 AM   #6
Progress Not Perfection
 

Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,715
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsskid View Post
In order for you to be able to use D-Nice's setting and to have a chance for them being accurate, you'd need to follow his panel aging procedure exactly.
Even so (and this was posted here over three years ago):

Television sets are manufactured with various electronic components;
all electronic components have varying levels of tolerances and manufacturing variations.
As a result of this, no two television sets will perform identically; there will be a normal distribution of performance in all operational parameters. In the case of TVs these will clearly noticeable in the areas of brightness, contrast, color saturation and tint.

Take any two "identical" televisions and put them side-by-side with the settings on exactly the same points and they will not look exactly the same except by random occurence.
The probabilities are that most of them will be somewhat close,
but many will be extremely different and not at all where they should be if properly calibrated.

For those who do not wish to believe this . . . fine and good luck.
__________________
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Charles Krug, 1978 Vintage Selection, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon
Beringer, 1980, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon Port
Morano, 1980 Vintage Port
Beaulieu Vinyards, 1982 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon
Stratford, 1983 Merlot
Chateau La France, 1986 St. Emilion
Sutter Home, 1982 Napa Valley Zinfandel


The lonesome sipper

Last edited by Scottnot; 05-28-2011 at 08:18 AM.
Scottnot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2011, 11:48 AM   #7
Former Super Moderator
 
Loves2Watch's Avatar
 

Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: In Flux
Posts: 20,284
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottnot View Post
Even so (and this was posted here over three years ago):

Television sets are manufactured with various electronic components;
all electronic components have varying levels of tolerances and manufacturing variations.
As a result of this, no two television sets will perform identically; there will be a normal distribution of performance in all operational parameters. In the case of TVs these will clearly noticeable in the areas of brightness, contrast, color saturation and tint.

Take any two "identical" televisions and put them side-by-side with the settings on exactly the same points and they will not look exactly the same except by random occurence.
The probabilities are that most of them will be somewhat close,
but many will be extremely different and not at all where they should be if properly calibrated.

For those who do not wish to believe this . . . fine and good luck.
Exactly...
__________________
It's always time for pie
Live everyday as if it was your last and plan on living forever...
Loves2Watch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 07:00 AM   #8
ISF Calibrator
 
dsskid's Avatar
 

Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 5,020
Default

Scott, I don't disagree. Reread my post. I stated to have any chance, not that the chances were good.
__________________
Displays are like 100% cotton t-shirts. Always buy a size larger than you think you'll need, because they tend to shrink over time.

Professional reviews of displays are an excellent tool, but the final decision should come from using your own eyes.




Living Room - Panasonic TH58PZ700U, Panasonic DMP-BDT215, Denon AVR-1911
Man-Cave - Pioneer Kuro Elite Pro-111FD, Pioneer Kuro BDP-320, Denon AVR-591BA, PS3

RIP L2W, PFC5 & Kosty
dsskid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 08:33 AM   #9
High Definition is the definition of life.
 

Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 398
Default

I own the panasonic tcp50gt25. its an awesome set. I didnt use d-nice settings. I use the thx settings and also the 3d settings that james cameron released for the gt25. that works great. I had to less calibration on the plasma compared to the other tvs that I had in the past. I had a rear projection and an lcds.
the black on black works great on the plasma.

Jacob
rubystone1111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2011, 05:10 PM   #10
Progress Not Perfection
 

Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,715
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dsskid View Post
Scott, I don't disagree. Reread my post. I stated to have any chance, not that the chances were good.
Sorry for any confusion there, didn't mean to imply that you might have disagreed;
just wanted to emphasize the crap-shoot nature of copying settings.
__________________
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Charles Krug, 1978 Vintage Selection, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon
Beringer, 1980, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon Port
Morano, 1980 Vintage Port
Beaulieu Vinyards, 1982 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon
Stratford, 1983 Merlot
Chateau La France, 1986 St. Emilion
Sutter Home, 1982 Napa Valley Zinfandel


The lonesome sipper
Scottnot is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Go Back   High Def Forum - Your High Definition Community & High Definition Resource > High Definition Viewing Mediums, HDTVs > Flat-Panel TVs
AddThis Social Bookmark Button
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:53 PM.



Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2004 - 2008, High Def Forum