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can i use 3 ohm speakers on a 8 ohm system??

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Old 03-17-2006, 11:55 AM   #1
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Default can i use 3 ohm speakers on a 8 ohm system??

I just got a 6.1 system-but only have 3 ohm speakers for it, thay cam from my old system, can i use them, or do i need to buy more speakers... please help....
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Old 03-17-2006, 12:06 PM   #2
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Have to know a lot more about your system, especially your amp or receiver. Most can't handle much below 6 ohms very efficiently. A high current amp could probably do 4 ohms without breathing too hard, but 3 is pushing it for any amp. What are they, by the way? Seems like an odd impedance. Most speaker are 4 or 8 ohms. I know Bose makes some 2 ohms for car factory installations.
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Old 03-20-2006, 04:23 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duanewesley
I just got a 6.1 system-but only have 3 ohm speakers for it, thay cam from my old system, can i use them, or do i need to buy more speakers... please help....

Always be carefull with impedence. The math for the is important and you might see smoke soon or months later.
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Old 09-15-2011, 07:05 PM   #4
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Default 3 ohms

I too thought my new purchase of 5 Sony surround speakers was a bust. Every speaker was labeled 3 ohms. I checked them with an ohm meter and guess what??? They were ALL 4.5 ohms. Thank goodness. Be sure and check yours before you throw them away. I hooked them up to a 65 watt RMS receiver and really put the bass to them. They took it all without popping or clipping. Amazing what they can do with a 3 inch speaker.
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Old 09-16-2011, 11:07 PM   #5
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Putting an ohm meter on a speaker will tell you nothing.

An ohmmeter measures resistance, not impedance. Both resistance and impedance use the same unit of measure, the ohm. They are not the same and cannot be used interchangeably.

Generally speaking, you want to match the amplifier with the speaker. If you are going to mismatch, the safe way to go is use speakers with a higher impedance than what the amplifier is specified to drive.
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Old 09-17-2011, 09:23 AM   #6
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Older (tube) amps were designed with a specific output impedance; for best distortion free audio it was best to use speakers that "matched" the output impedance of the amp.

Solid state amps are different; their output impedance is typically 0 Ohms and they are able to drive just about any speaker that one may wish to hang on them.

Yes, lower impedance speakers will draw more current and so the amp will run hotter or may overheat if the impedance is too low.
However, since lower impedance speakers will draw more current at any given volume setting, they tend to "play louder" than higher impedance speakers.

Most modern solid state equipment should have no problem driving 3 or 4 Ohm speakers through "normal" volume ranges.
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Old 09-17-2011, 11:43 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottnot View Post
Older (tube) amps were designed with a specific output impedance; for best distortion free audio it was best to use speakers that "matched" the output impedance of the amp.

Solid state amps are different; their output impedance is typically 0 Ohms and they are able to drive just about any speaker that one may wish to hang on them.

Yes, lower impedance speakers will draw more current and so the amp will run hotter or may overheat if the impedance is too low.
However, since lower impedance speakers will draw more current at any given volume setting, they tend to "play louder" than higher impedance speakers.

Most modern solid state equipment should have no problem driving 3 or 4 Ohm speakers through "normal" volume ranges.
Tube amps had transformers that had taps that were typically marked 4, 8 & 16 ohms. When you attached a speaker that matched the tap, the output tubes would "see" the load.

Solid state amps do not have output transformers, the approach is to make the amp's output impedance as low as possible. (this is reflected in the spec "dampning factor")

True, a typical solid state amp has a outout impedance of less than 1 ohm. That does not mean you can safely attach a speaker load of less than 1 ohm.

Drawing excessive current is what damages an amplifier.

My guess a speaker that is rated at 3 ohms was sold with an amplifier and the amplifier and speaker are matched.

I would advise anybody caution before hooking up an excessily low impedance speaker to a random amplifier.

Having said that, many consumer amplifiers have protection circuits that will clamp the output current aa it approaches a maximum value.
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Old 09-17-2011, 06:19 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by videomot View Post
True, a typical solid state amp has a outout impedance of less than 1 ohm. That does not mean you can safely attach a speaker load of less than 1 ohm.
Absolutely agree.

Quote:
Drawing excessive current is what damages an amplifier.
Agree again.
On the other side of the coin, hanging 3 Ohm 40 W speakers on an amplifier designed to drive 8 Ohm 40 W speakers may quite likely blow the speakers if/when the volume is cranked up.

Quote:
I would advise anybody caution before hooking up an excessily low impedance speaker to a random amplifier.
Agree again.
In this case I don't think 3 Ohms is excessively low; yet if it were me, I be careful cranking up the volume and keep a check on the amp for overheating.

Quote:
Having said that, many consumer amplifiers have protection circuits that will clamp the output current aa it approaches a maximum value.
Another good point . . . which protects the amp but not the speakers.

But it doesn't sound like the OP is dealing with an expensive amplifier or expensive speakers;
I'd give it a go . . . with caution.
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Old 10-24-2012, 10:51 PM   #9
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has anyone seen this report:
http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calcula...akerAndOhm.htm
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