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Why cant I adjust tint/hue??

Daffypuck
03-04-2007, 12:59 PM
I have a Samsung model & it wont allow me to adjust the tint/hue when in PC/component mode. Why is that???

To avoid another post Ill also ask this. How should I set my pixal shift in the setup menu? Should I put it on 1,2,3 or 4??

nyboy11
03-04-2007, 02:12 PM
mine doesnt allow me either

Lee Stewart
03-04-2007, 04:09 PM
In the Samsung series only the XX73 allows the adjustment of Tint. the XX53 does not. The other main difference is Cable Card accebility - 73 - yes . . .53 - no

Lee Stewart
03-07-2007, 08:39 AM
Just a quick update to this thread . . .you can adjust the Tint if you use the S-Video input - so it appears that the Tint Control is for SD use only.

paulc
03-08-2007, 02:54 PM
First, you should have plenty of control over that stuff right on your computer. All one would need to do is run some calibration software on the display to create a profile for the computer.

scoosdad
03-08-2007, 04:24 PM
Having a 'tint' or saturation control on a display device in the first place is a by-product of a television set or projector having to decode the separate R, G, and B channels out of composite or s-video signals, where it's encoded in a complicated mathematical summation into a simpler form to transmit down a single cable.

If you're feeding it R, G, and B already decoded as component three wire or five wire VGA signals, the theory is that if your set is properly calibrated at the factory, you don't need saturation or tint in the first place since the signals are already separated and don't need decoding.

It's sort of the same reason why a computer monitor doesn't usually have saturation or tint on the incoming VGA feed from the computer. They may have individual red, green, or blue adjustments in the monitor setup, and those are just simple voltage level shifts on the three component signals coming up the wire from the PC. They don't give you those adjustments in a consumer television or projector because the manufacturers assume that their internal setup is perfect, and that the DVD player or cable box you've hooked up is also flawless in generating its signal. :rolleyes:

Tint and saturation adjustments have nothing to do with whether or not a signal is HD or not. It depends on whether the signal will need to be decoded from an encoded format or not. My cable box, for example, decodes SD channels into three wire component to push to my display, and the saturation and tint controls on the display are grayed out and not available. Does exactly the same thing for HD channels as well.

d6500k
03-09-2007, 09:49 PM
the theory is that if your set is properly calibrated at the factory, you don't need saturation or tint in the first place since the signals are already separated and don't need decoding.

And therin lays the rub.

More displays on the market today actually are getting the color decoders properly set... well, with less errors than before. The problems occur when a manufacturer does not have the sat/phase for each primary correctly calibrated. Add to this that programming sources may induce errors that a small margin of control could reign in, if provided by the manufacturers.

scoosdad has summed it up quite nicely. In a perfect world there would be no decoder errors. I think I have found two displays where I needed to make no change in the service menus for the decoder check to read zero error. BTW, in case you want to know which ones...

Both were from the same manufacturer (sony). The catch? Out of ten that I have calibrated, same model and vintage, only those two out of the ten were spot on. IMO, they got lucky (at the Sony plant) and the two consumers got what they paid for. The rest, well, they had their sat/phase controls locked out and were s.o.l. until a calibration was done.

We ISF techs absolutely hate this removal of basic commands. I think you will see more displays with even better color management controls available in the future due to your, and our, concern.

Doug k