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Camping tv's

rosie
04-19-2012, 12:06 AM
:o

Could anyone tell me why, when I go camping in the caravan, that I get good reception on my little tv with a set top box, but only very bad reception on the LCD Digital tv?

projectsho89
04-19-2012, 06:12 AM
The LCD has a comparatively crappy tuner.

dumont
04-19-2012, 01:37 PM
The LCD has a comparatively crappy tuner.

And a lousy antenna.

airscapes
04-19-2012, 02:15 PM
Only been camping in a tent once.. but been to the camp in the mountains (no TV no Radio no running water. )
Isn't that sort of the idea of camping.. get away from the modern comforts and technology??

Gary350
04-19-2012, 04:58 PM
The TV manufactures assume NO ONE watches antenna TV so they save money by not putting a good preamp in the TV. The old TVs have good preamps.

Collect some free TVs on craigslist to have later when they are no longer available.

JB Antennaman
04-20-2012, 12:08 PM
Back to my origional post which the forum moderator chose not to save.

Back in the day, when all we had was analog television.
Analog television was mostly broadcast on VHF channels.
VHF and analog was a good combination.
The power level was very high and there was two effective transmitters.
The Video was a type of Single Side Band - actually called Vestigal Side band, which threw away almost all of one of the side bands and pushed the power up into the remaining side band - which was like almost doubling the ERP of a AM transmitter.
The Audio was broadcast FM - at a much lower power level.
The audio was also Horizontally polarized - since the mismatch between vertical and horizontal was almost 40 Db - the television for the most part ignored all but the very strongest FM commercial radio signals.

DIGITAL
Digital is the exact opposite.
Digital requires a percise signal level - analog - even if there was some distortion and static and snow - you could still watch the picture.
Digital is all or nothing - either you have a perfect picture or you have nothing at all.

The television has absolutely nothing to do with reception.
You people are starting to sound like CB'rs here...

If you require a antenna 40' in the air, and a deep fringe solution to view television at home. If you go camping in the same general area - unless you can see the light blinking on top of the transmitter tower - you are going to need the exact same antenna and pre amplifier and antenna rotor - PERIOD!

The television doesn't care that you are camping and the transmitter doesn't care that you are camping, and most camping spots are built in remote locations so you can - get away from it all.
So why in the world would you expect the rules of reception to change - just because you had reception before - you still expect reception now - when you are using the wrong antenna, at the wrong height and are usually further away from the transmitter then what you are when you are home sitting in your lazy boy chair?

I'm really impressed that the forum experts didn't inform you of this sooner!

Gary350
04-20-2012, 02:04 PM
I have 3 TVs at home and they all pick up different signals on the same antenna.

The New TV is the worse one. If the signal is not above 50% there is not reception at all. If the signal is between 50% and 65% the reception comes and goes. From 65% to 80% reception is good unless the wind blows very hard then the signal fades out. When the sun is on the horizon there is NO TV reception at all until the sun gets over the horizon. If the signal is less than 93% a hard rain or hard snow will block the signal. A signal above 98% reception is not effected by rain or snow.

The same antenna connected to a 3 year on analog TV with a convert box works good most of the time. If the signal is above 75% reception is excellent.

The same antenna attached to a 20 year old analog with a convert box works great if the signal is above 25%.

Field strength meters on all the TVs is like compairing apples to oranges. The 20 year old TV has the best reception all the time no matter what the weather is doing.

dumont
04-20-2012, 09:07 PM
I have 3 TVs at home and they all pick up different signals on the same antenna.

The New TV is the worse one. If the signal is not above 50% there is not reception at all. If the signal is between 50% and 65% the reception comes and goes. From 65% to 80% reception is good unless the wind blows very hard then the signal fades out. When the sun is on the horizon there is NO TV reception at all until the sun gets over the horizon. If the signal is less than 93% a hard rain or hard snow will block the signal. A signal above 98% reception is not effected by rain or snow.

The same antenna connected to a 3 year on analog TV with a convert box works good most of the time. If the signal is above 75% reception is excellent.

The same antenna attached to a 20 year old analog with a convert box works great if the signal is above 25%.

Field strength meters on all the TVs is like compairing apples to oranges. The 20 year old TV has the best reception all the time no matter what the weather is doing.

I'm having trouble understanding why there is a difference between your old sets. The converter box is doing all the reception work. The TV is just a monitor for the converter. To me the same converter with the same antenna and same antenna cable length should recieve with no difference. What the box is connected to does not matter.

I do believe there is a difference in the quality of tuners in today's TV's. As stated before it's a good place to save a few bucks.

JB Antennaman
04-21-2012, 08:41 AM
I'm having trouble understanding why there is a difference between your old sets. The converter box is doing all the reception work. The TV is just a monitor for the converter. To me the same converter with the same antenna and same antenna cable length should recieve with no difference. What the box is connected to does not matter.

I do believe there is a difference in the quality of tuners in today's TV's. As stated before it's a good place to save a few bucks.

Dumont - you are absolutley 100% correct.
The difference is that when you use a 3 way splitter, the ports are not unilateral.
At the same time - each run of coax is of a different length and unknown origion - hence each coax works a little different.

For some unknown reason - people aren't too bright and they want to do everything themselves to save some money and they are all proud of themselves when they do it, but when it doesn't work - the fault is always on something else and not the workmanship and materials.

People scrimps and trys to save a buck on the materials and when it does not work - they wonder why I do not have good reception?

rosie
04-22-2012, 04:21 AM
Thanks everyone for your replies. I think the tuner is the problem on the digital tv. Does anyone know if it is possible to connect a set top box to a digital tv to get a better reception...? or is that a stupid question.

stereocraig
04-22-2012, 07:37 AM
Thanks everyone for your replies. I think the tuner is the problem on the digital tv. Does anyone know if it is possible to connect a set top box to a digital tv to get a better reception...? or is that a stupid question.


The only stupid question, is the one that goes unasked.

A set top box will work fine on any set that has the appropriate A/V inputs and the performance will be identical on any set you use.