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How do I add a simple tv to my directv??

hidefman30
09-28-2009, 08:16 AM
Ok heres the problem upon install we had two tv's. Now we have three. I want my third tv (a cable ready crt) to be hooked up. The main tv is a hd dvr in the living room. The second is the kids tv, which has a standard directvbox. The third is in my room that I am trying to hookup. I went into the crawlspace and located a slitter thing where the coax cables branch off into different rooms. So I got a piece of coax and ran it from the tv to the splitter. When I hit the auto program the channels didn't read or register!? The tv is fairly recent and cable ready. I am just trying to watch basic satellite on it. What should I do now?

joed32
09-28-2009, 08:19 AM
It will need to be hooked up to a receiver.

hidefman30
09-28-2009, 08:53 AM
Why? Can't you just split the signal somehow like cable? I have a friend with comcast cable and you just add a splitter and run a new coax and presto!

Spanky_Partain
09-28-2009, 10:17 AM
Nope. You need a receiver to receive Directv SAT signals. Nothing else will do. You can run a set of wires from the current receiver and hook it up to the bedroom TV, but whatever you are watching on that will be on the TV in the bedroom too! $5.00 a month will get you another receiver. However, you cannot run a cable to do this. You will need a RCA type cord, S-video, Composite Cables, or HDMI depending on what is open on the receiver you are taping in to.

DIRECTVMAN
09-28-2009, 01:08 PM
I don't think the OP wants to watch the same thing in the bedroom as the living room.

You'll need a DIRECTV receiver in the third room and a DIRECTV line from the dish or multiswitch to the 3rd room. Don't try to connect a DIRECTV line to a cabletv splitter.

JPL
09-28-2009, 01:28 PM
You're talking two different architectures here. With traditional cable, all the channels are fed in over the coax at the same time. As long as you have a cable tuner you can get in a channel. Although with digital cable even that's changed - digital cable uses a method known as QAM to get you your channels. If you have a TV with a QAM tuner you can get in the channel without the need for a set top box as long as the cable company doesn't encrypt it.

DBS service, like DirecTV, don't employ QAM for their feeds. They don't feed all the channels at once. They only feed the channels you're currently watching. Which is why in the old days, you could literally only watch one channel off of a dish at a time. If you had a second TV you had to get a second dish. They've since upgraded the hardware so you can have multiple LNBs, which allow you to get in multiple channels at the same time off the dish.

Still, to get in the channel the dish has to tune into a specific transponder off the satellite. All of that is controlled by your set top box. TVs aren't made with built-in DirecTV receivers (although there used to be one such model which no longer exists). So you need a separate box to control the signal.

JPL
09-28-2009, 01:29 PM
One other point - you can't use a standard splitter with DBS either. The thing that you're talking about is called a multi-switch. It's like a souped-up splitter used for DBS service.

hidefman30
09-28-2009, 02:41 PM
I see well it looks like I am jacked up. Becuase I refuse to pay for another box. So I wont be watching tv in the bedroom. And an extra $5.00 fee too, no way. I see why some people still have crappy cable. At least you can run it everywhere for next to nothing. Yeah so Directv wants $100 to upgrade my new tv to an HD receiver, and more money for a third reciever if I want to watch my kids crappy old tv in the bedroom. I give up!

IamMrDJ
09-28-2009, 03:13 PM
I see well it looks like I am jacked up. Becuase I refuse to pay for another box. So I wont be watching tv in the bedroom. And an extra $5.00 fee too, no way. I see why some people still have crappy cable. At least you can run it everywhere for next to nothing. Yeah so Directv wants $100 to upgrade my new tv to an HD receiver, and more money for a third reciever if I want to watch my kids crappy old tv in the bedroom. I give up!

That is why you have a choice. You can choose to bitch all you want about the price of everything. If you are so adamant to not pay extra fees why not go directly to cable for all your TV's and run as many lines as you want?

DIRECTVMAN
09-28-2009, 03:49 PM
DBS service, like DirecTV, don't employ QAM for their feeds. They don't feed all the channels at once. They only feed the channels you're currently watching. Which is why in the old days, you could literally only watch one channel off of a dish at a time. If you had a second TV you had to get a second dish.

How far back in the "old days" are you talking about ? I never remember hearing in the old days that if you wanted to watch DIRECTV on 2 TVs you had to have 2 dishes. The first DIRECTV system I ever got back in 1993 or so had 2 outputs off the dish. If you wanted more than 2 outputs you could connect a multiswitch.

You have multiple LNB dishes to receive signals off of multiple satellite location(99/101/103, etc..) not to receive multiple channels at the same time off the same dish.

isszguy
10-01-2009, 10:52 PM
I see well it looks like I am jacked up. Becuase I refuse to pay for another box. So I wont be watching tv in the bedroom. And an extra $5.00 fee too, no way. I see why some people still have crappy cable. At least you can run it everywhere for next to nothing. Yeah so Directv wants $100 to upgrade my new tv to an HD receiver, and more money for a third reciever if I want to watch my kids crappy old tv in the bedroom. I give up!

Actually you can't do what you write about on some cable networks either. Comcast out in the Seattle area is requiring boxes now that digital tv is here. If you really want to watch TV in another room, do what one poster already suggested and run that TV from one of the unused outputs on the DVR. If your CRT will accept HDMI, I suggest you then use the component setup for you HD TV.

If your CRT doesn't have HDMI and it does have component, then power it that way, but be advised that you will have to then run a separate audio cable. With an RF remote you should be able to change channels from your other room. I have a similar setup in my office and my wife's laundry room. Works fine for us and we save $5 a month. However, there are some hardware costs (cable and an extra remote.)

JPL
10-02-2009, 06:14 AM
Actually you can't do what you write about on some cable networks either. Comcast out in the Seattle area is requiring boxes now that digital tv is here.

Very true. Many cable systems are migrating to full digital. Heck, CableVision has even asked the FCC for permission to scramble their local digital channels (currently they're required to be carried in the clear - unencrypted).

DIRECTVMAN
10-02-2009, 10:56 AM
A person with digital cable can get some unencrypted digital cable channels without a box from the cable company if the TV they have has a QAM tuner in it. Most of the new TVs have a QAM tuner.

deadhead68
10-02-2009, 11:41 AM
A person with digital cable can get some unencrypted digital cable channels without a box from the cable company if the TV they have has a QAM tuner in it. Most of the new TVs have a QAM tuner.

That's not 100% true. Some cable companies are encrypting all of their digital channels (as long as they offer the analog counterpart). Therefore, one would need a cable card or STB to receive any digital channels even if their TV had a QAM tuner.

DIRECTVMAN
10-02-2009, 12:43 PM
That's not 100% true. Some cable companies are encrypting all of their digital channels (as long as they offer the analog counterpart). Therefore, one would need a cable card or STB to receive any digital channels even if their TV had a QAM tuner.

This is from Wikipedia:
QAM-based HD programming of local stations is sometimes available to analog cable subscribers, without paying the additional fees for a digital cable box. The availability of QAM HD programming is rarely described or publicized in cable company product literature. Cable providers must provide rebroadcasts of locally aired programming in analog (if their plant is an analog/digital mix), but they may also carryequipment, per FCC Sec. 76.630 and CFR Title 47, §76.901(a). These usually include the local affiliates for CBS, NBC, ABC, PBS, and Fox, and the cable providers comply by rebroadcasting them over rebroadcasts of high-definition digital locally aired programming, in an unencrypted form, that does not require the customer to use leased QAM channels. The law does not require the cable provider to advertise their availability, and the cable customer service representatives are known to unequivocally (and incorrectly) insist to customers that a converter box is mandatory to view any HD channels.

On my girlfriend's TV she was able to get the local HD channels unencrypted with her QAM tuner as well as several other unencrypted digital channels. :yippee:

deadhead68
10-02-2009, 01:54 PM
On my girlfriend's TV she was able to get the local HD channels unencrypted with her QAM tuner as well as several other unencrypted digital channels. :yippee:

I can too. But not everybody can was my only point. :confused:

isszguy
10-07-2009, 10:29 PM
I've dumped my cable so I can't accurately state what the current status is with QAM tuners, but if it is the same as it was about 6 months ago, all the channels that I had tuned with my QAM tuner were renumbered with what appeared to be random numbers. And any channel over 100 could not be viewed with a QAM turner.

antennaguy
10-08-2009, 07:07 AM
....more money for a third reciever if I want to watch my kids crappy old tv in the bedroom. I give up!
There is a third option although not without it’s problems. Hook up a video modulator to the audio/video outputs of the D*TV receiver. Run the RF output to the 3rd TV. Set up (or buy) the remotes for RF. You can then watch (and tune) D*TV on the 3rd TV but not a different channel from the “main” TV. This is what I do, except I run the antenna into the RF modulator (less than $10 from MCM Electronics) which only comes on when it senses a video input. I can watch OTA on the 2nd TV or I can tune it to channel 3, flip on D*TV and watch D*TV on the 2nd TV. The RF remotes tune the D*TV without being able to “see” the D*TV receiver. One added benefit is the 16:9 signal is horizontally squeezed to fit 4:3. the 2nd TV spreads it back to 16:9 and it looks normal, in 480i of course. The Sony runs normally off HDMI. :2cents